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Exhibition Review – Olafur Eliasson: In Real Life at Tate Modern from 11 July 2019 to 5 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Olafur Eliasson returns to Tate Modern following his Turbine Hall installation The weather project in 2003, for an exhibition of his career to date. The exhibition is the most comprehensive presentation of Eliasson’s work, and his first major survey in the UK.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Olafur Eliasson work is well known for engaging the public with artworks which offer experiences that can be shared by visitors. Tate Modern has bought together over 40 works spanning the last three decades from early installations to new paintings and sculptures. The exhibition also examine Eliasson’s collaborations in a wide number fields such as sustainability, migration, education and architecture.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Eliasson was influenced in his time in Iceland by natural phenomena such as water, light and mist and these have often been key themes in his work. On the terrace outside Tate Modern, visitors encounter Waterfall 2019, a new installation measuring over 11 metres in height.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Works inside the exhibition include Moss wall 1994, a 20 metres wide wall entirely covered with Scandinavian reindeer moss.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Beauty 1993, creates the natural phenomenon of a rainbow inside the exhibition

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and Din blinde passager (Your blind passenger) 2010 takes visitors on a disorienting journey through a 39-metre-long corridor full of dense fog.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Eliasson throughout his career has created works that challenge accepted views of perception. Many of his installations play with light and shifting colours such as Your uncertain shadow (colour) 2010.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Yellow mono-frequency lights are used within Room for one colour 1997 reduce viewers’ perception to shades of yellow and black.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Kaleidoscopic sculptures include Your spiral view 2002 and the newly created Your planetary window 2019, create optical illusions that challenges visitors to see their environment in new ways.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition explores the artist’s fascination with geometry with many works, such as Stardust particle 2014, Model room 2003, bringing together around 450 models, prototypes, and geometrical studies of various sizes that record Eliasson’s collaboration with his studio team and, Icelandic artist, mathematician and architect Einar Thorsteinn.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The show concludes with The Expanded Studio, which explores Eliasson’s engagement with social and environmental issues. His projects have included Little Sun, which provides solar-powered lamps and chargers to communities without access to electricity. Green light – An artistic workshop, in which asylum seekers and refugees, together with members of the public, constructed Green light lamps and took part in accompanying educational programmes and Ice Watch, an installation of glacial ice from Greenland, recently staged outside Tate Modern which aims to increase awareness of the climate emergency.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating and interactive exhibition provides the opportunity to enter the various worlds of Olafur Eliasson. The artist takes the visitor on a journey that often challenges our views of reality by distorting colour, light and perception. He also considers how art can be used in dealing with social and environmental issues by considering how we interact and understand our environment.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Takis at Tate Modern from 3 July to 27 October 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Tate Modern presents the largest exhibition related to Takis (Panayiotis Vassilakis) in the UK, the exhibition features over 70 works and includes the rarely-seen Magnetic Fields installation and a group of antennae-like sculptures called Signals.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Over a 70-year career, Takis has been at the forefront of kinetic art and has pioneered new forms of sculpture, painting and musical structures to harness invisible natural forces. Takis was born in Athens in 1925 and as a self-taught artist moved to Paris in the 1950s and gradually became a well known figure in the artistic circles of Paris, London and New York. The exhibition is not chronological but is arranged around a number of themes that have fascinated the artist over his long career.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 1959, Takis moved from figurative work to experimentation with magnetic energy, the first room in the exhibition features Magnetic Fields 1969, on display for the first time since the 1970s, in which magnetic pendulums trigger movement from nearly a hundred small sculptures.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Also in this room is Bronze Figure 1954-55 and Plastic Figure 1954-5 which shows that the artist was inspired by the work of Picasso and Giacometti.

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The next room entitled Magnetism and Metal includes works like Telesculpture 1960, Magnetron 1966 and Telepainting 1966. Takis experimented with metallic objects that float with the use of magnets to create a dynamic sculpture of movement.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

His inventions and the dialogues around the works drew praise from diverse artist circles from William S. Burroughs and the American Beat poets to artists like Marcel Duchamp. Takis travelled regularly to London in the 1950s and 1960s and his work was featured in Signals London gallery which was an important meeting place for the transmission of ideas about breaking down boundaries between the arts and sciences.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The artist’s Signal series became known for their ability to respond to their surroundings, they often consisted of thin, flexible poles topped with objects or electric lights.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the 1960s, the artist began to include sound with the use of electromagnets that would vibrate instrument strings. Musicals 1984-2004 shows the whole process in action.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It was not just sound but electric lights that began to interest Takis, the Light and Darkness room includes a Signal series that plays with light and energy.

The artist was influenced by a number of artistic and social movements in the 1960s and worked with scientific institutes to develop work into renewable energies. He was also one of the founders of the Art Workers’ Coalition which sought to widen diversity in museums and protect the rights of the creative community.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the 1980s, Takis began to build his research Centre for the Art and the Sciences, now known as the Takis Foundation. At the centre of the foundation is an open air theatre space organised around a central Gong. A group of these sculptures are featured in the final room entitled Music of the Spheres which incorporates some of the artist’s ideas of cosmic harmony and how energy and natural forces interact to create the universe.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This intriguing exhibition introduces the work of Takis to a wider audience in the UK. Although better known in France, Greece and the United States, the artist’s work has generally failed to engage interest in the UK. This is somewhat surprising because there is often a fun element to the artist’s work which often has a very 1960s ambience when the cult of the ‘modern’ was in vogue. Although light and sound sculptures are now commonplace, it is worth considering that Takis was one of the early pioneers in this type of work and deserves wider recognition.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Natalia Goncharova at Tate Modern from 6 June to 8 September 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents the UK’s first ever retrospective of the Russian avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova. It features a survey of an artist who is largely unknown but was considered a pioneering and radical figure and celebrated during her lifetime as a leading modernist artist. The exhibition features over 160 international loans which are rarely outside of Russia , including from Russia’s State Tretyakov Gallery which houses the largest collection of Goncharova works in the world.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Goncharova was born in 1881 and grew up on her family’s country estate  in the Tula Province, this period was important for the artist because despite her being an aristocrat’s daughter,  she was exposed to the traditional customs and cultures of her native Central Russia which provided inspiration throughout  her artistic career.

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The second room charts Goncharova’s move from the provinces to Moscow when she was eleven, whilst in Moscow she decided to pursue an artistic career and was greatly influenced by the works of Cezanne, Gauguin and Picasso. At the age of 20 she enrolled at the School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture where she met fellow artist Mikhail Larionov. In the room, Picasso’s Queen Isabeau 1909, is displayed near Goncharova’s Peasants Picking Apples 1911 and Orchard in Autumn 1909.

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Goncharova  gradually found herself as a leader of the Moscow avant-garde and was prolific in her output, the third room plays tribute to  Goncharova’s remarkable 1913 retrospective that was held at the Mikhailova Art Salon in Moscow, which originally featured some 800 works. The room includes work from the 1913 exhibition and covers the full range of the artist’s work from folk art, work about the countryside like the monumental seven-part work The Harvest 1911 to more modernist works like her paintings of nudes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The success of the 1913 show led to Goncharova being in demand in a number of ways,  room four is dedicated to her work in fashion design and her collaborations with Nadezhda Lamanova, couturier of the Imperial court.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although Goncharova and Larionov arrived in Paris in 1914 at the invitation of Sergei Diaghilev, to work on costume and set designs for the Ballets Russes, the start of the First World War led to the couple returning to Moscow. The exhibition features her series of lithographs entitled Mystical Images of War that illustrate the bravery and futility of the conflict.

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A section devoted to Goncharova’s religious painting include the Evangelists 1911, a four-panel work which had delighted London in 1912 but shocked Russia’s capital of St Petersburg in 1914, Christ the Saviour 1910-11 and Mother of God 1911.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Like many artists at the start of the 20th century, Goncharova was attracted to futurism and produced a number of works that dealt with technology and machines. The exhibition reunites Linen from Tate’s own collection with Loom + Woman (The Weaver) from the National Museum of Wales and The Forest from the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, all created in the same studio in 1913 and on display together for the first time since then.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Goncharova and her partner left Moscow to tour with Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1915 in Europe, the political turmoil leading to October Revolution of 1917 meant it was not advisable to go back to Russia and they set up home in Paris. After her success with Ballets Russes , Goncharova was in demand with commissions for fashion, costume and interior design, she also exhibited her work in Europe and the United States. The exhibition features a decorative screen Spring 1928, commissioned by the Arts Club of Chicago and Bathers 1922, a monumental triptych displayed in the UK for the first time.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final room in  the exhibition is dedicated to her collaborations with the Ballets Russes, the work for which she was best known from 1914 to the 1950s. It presents the artist’s most groundbreaking work for the theatre, including costume designs for Le Coq d’or (The Golden Cockerel) and Les Noces (The Wedding), both performed on London stages in the 1920s and 30s, as well as examples of actual costumes used in historic ballet productions.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition introduces the work of Natalia Goncharova to a wider audience, the artist like her contemporary Kazimir Malevich tried to combine the traditions of Russian culture with the modern world. Her prolific output in a variety of media is testament to her talent to work in a number of styles to gain commercial success.  Unfortunately Goncharova like many Russian artists suffered after the 1917 Revolution, the images of peasants was not required by the new Russian state and the people outside of Russia began to view the new state as a threat.  It is only after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc that artists like Goncharova are being reassessed and recognised as pioneering and radical figures.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Natalia Goncharova at Tate Modern from 6 June to 8 September 2019

This summer, Tate Modern will present the UK’s first ever retrospective of the Russian avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova. It will be a sweeping survey of a pioneering and radical figure, celebrated during her lifetime as a leading modernist artist.

Goncharova’s artistic output traces, influences and transcends the art movements of the 20th century. Born in 1881, she was inspired by the traditional customs and cultures of her native Central Russia – inspirations that pervade her life’s work. By the age of 32, she had already established herself as a leader of the Moscow avant-garde and was the subject of the first monographic exhibition ever staged by a Russian modernist artist. Arriving in Paris in 1914 at the invitation of Sergei Diaghilev, Goncharova was feted for her vibrant costume and set designs for the Ballets Russes.

The exhibition gathers together over 160 international loans which rarely travel, including from Russia’s State Tretyakov Gallery which houses the largest collection of Goncharova works in the world. At the heart of the show will be a room evoking Goncharova’s remarkable 1913 retrospective that was held at the Mikhailova Art Salon in Moscow, which originally featured some 800 works.

Highlights will include early paintings such as Peasants Gathering Apples 1911, formerly owned by the Morozov family, one of great art collectors of the early 20th century; the monumental seven-part work The Harvest 1911, bringing together paintings from four international collections; and her scandalous paintings of nudes, the first public display of which led to her trial for obscenity.

A section devoted to Goncharova’s religious painting will include the Evangelists 1911, a four-panel work which had delighted London in 1912 but shocked Russia’s capital of St Petersburg in 1914 where the authorities removed it from display.

A room will be dedicated to her work in fashion design and her collaborations with Nadezhda Lamanova, couturier of the Imperial court, while her forays into interior design will be represented by the decorative screen Spring 1928, commissioned by the Arts Club of Chicago and never lent until now, and Bathers 1922, a monumental triptych which will be displayed in the UK for the first time.

The exhibition will reunite Linen from Tate’s own collection with Loom + Woman (The Weaver) from the National Museum of Wales and The Forest from the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, all created in the same studio in 1913 and on display together for the first time since then.

Finally, the exhibition will close with a room dedicated to her collaborations with the Ballets Russes, the work for which she was best known from 1914 to the 1950s. It will present the artist’s most groundbreaking work for the theatre, including costume designs for Le Coq d’or (The Golden Cockerel) and Les Noces (The Wedding), both performed on London stages in the 1920s and 30s, as well as examples of actual costumes used in historic ballet productions.

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review: Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern – 27 February to 9 June 2019

Tate Modern presents a major exhibition of the work of American artist Dorothea Tanning (1910-2012). The exhibition is the first large-scale exhibition of her work for 25 years and the first ever to span Tanning’s seven-decade career. The exhibition brings together around 100 works from around the world and includes over a third of which are shown in the UK for the first time. Tanning worked in a range of media from paintings, drawings, stuffed textile sculptures and installations.

Dorothea Tanning was born in 1910 in the small town of Galesburg, Illinois and was fascinated by Gothic and Romantic literature. In the 1930s, she decided to move to Chicago then New York to pursue her artist career. She first encountered surrealism in New York in the 1930s and was instantly attracted to exploring the subconscious in her work. Tanning met German painter Max Ernst in 1942 and they married in 1946.

Tanning began to plumb her own subconscious depths with early works that takes ordinary domestic scenes and introduces gothic scenes that are full of strange imagery. Works from this period such as Children’s Games 1942 and Eine Kleine Nachtmusik 1943 are full of suppressed desires and burgeoning sexuality where open doors represent portals to other places.

Tanning applied these types of symbolism to self-portrait Birthday 1942 which she believed marked her ‘birth’ as a surrealist.

Doors and domestic settings became common motifs in the early part of her career with works like La Truite au bleu (Poached Trout), Some Roses and Their Phantoms and Portrait de famille (Family Portrait).

Tanning held a life-long passion for dance, music and performance and produced set and costume designs for ballets by George Balanchine and John Cranko in the late 1940-50s. These are shown with a series of dynamic figurative paintings such as Tango Lives 1977 that explore movement and sensuality.

In the mid-1960s, Tanning used her Singer sewing machine to make a highly original ‘family’ of soft sculptures that are a main focus of the exhibition. These hand-crafted sculptures are often like body parts that become contorted and intertwined objects. Works like Étreinte 1969 and Nue Couchée 1969-70 illustrate these transformations as does the remarkable room-sized installation Chambre 202, Hôtel du Pavot 1970-3.

After the death of Ernst in 1976, Tanning returned to New York and experimented with her soft sculptures that became objects that straddle the line between playful and sinister. Her later paintings followed this idea of transformation where bodies and nature merge in Poppies 1987 and On Avalon 1987.

This fascinating exhibition takes viewers into the strange and wonderful world of Dorothea Tanning. Her style is similar to Salvador Dali but with a Gothic twist that creates worlds full of symbolism and unconscious desires. Tanning is not widely known in the UK and this exhibition offers the viewer to explore her extraordinary career. In many respects, her strange worlds are oddly familiar which suggests she was perhaps ahead of her time and something of a pioneer.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review: Franz West at Tate Modern from 20 February – 2 June 2019

Tate Modern presents a major exhibition of the work of Franz West (1947-2012), this is the first posthumous retrospective and the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work ever staged in the UK. The exhibition features nearly 200 works including abstract sculptures, furniture, collages and monumental outdoor works.

The exhibition explores the artist’s legacy by considering his work from over four decades and presents many of his well-known and rarely seen pieces. His friend and former collaborator Sarah Lucas has contributed to the exhibition by designing walls and pedestals.

West lived in Vienna and was influenced by the works of philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein and psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. He also enjoyed the atmosphere of the coffee houses that was often the centre of intellectual debate. The entrance to the exhibition brings you face to face with the artist with two films about the artist made in 1969 and 2002.

The exhibition shows First Passstück 1978/1994 alongside other important original works from the series, and the installation Passstücke mit Box und Video 1996 where four pieces can be handled by visitors.

In contrast to the earlier Passstücke, Legitimate Sculptures were not intended to be handled, some of these sculptures were created to stand on unconventional or deliberately crude plinths.

Combinations and Collaborations are two rooms that explore West’s work in the 1980s in which he brings together artworks and text in new ways and coming together with other artists to create unusual dynamics.

It was at this time, that the artist began to experiment with art and furniture which features furniture and furniture spaces not as functional pieces but pieces of work in their own right. He takes this to its logical conclusion with the A Franz West Living Room.

In the 1990s, West’s work became more widely known and he exhibited in several museums in Europe and the USA. He also began to create large-scale installations such as Auditorium 1992, West’s contribution to Documenta IX, and Epiphany on Chairs 2011.

The exhibition concludes with a series of West’s large aluminum works and a collection of maquettes for the artist’s outdoor sculptures. Also included is selection of West’s witty poster designs for his exhibitions.

Six of West’s monumental structures, including Dorit 2002 a six-metre tall tower in vibrant pink, are installed on Tate Modern’s South Landscape and there are other works outside of the exhibition space.

This interesting and attractive exhibition illustrates West’s playful approach to his work. Often seen as an outsider of the established art world, he often pokes fun at those who take art too seriously. Like Anselm Kiefer, he prefers his works to be enigmatic and allows the viewer to create their own narrative. Franz West is not widely known in the UK, therefore the exhibition allows the opportunity to discover the colourful and curious world of the artist.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review – Pierre Bonnard : Colour of Memory at Tate Modern from 23rd January to 6th May 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents the UK’s first major Pierre Bonnard exhibition in 20 years, the exhibition entitled  Pierre Bonnard : Colour of Memory explores the work of French painter and how he developed his own unique style. The exhibition brings together around 100 of his greatest works from museums and private collections around the world.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition spans four decades from the emergence of Bonnard’s unique style in 1912 to his death in 1947 and  shows how the artist constructed his paintings to express moments of particular significance.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition begins with Young Women in the Garden which illustrates how Bonnard would take an initial image but would continuously work on the canvas for months or years to get to a stage where the artist is satisfied. This particular painting was started in 1921-3 but was not finished till 1945-6. Not all his paintings took so long to complete but Bonnard liked to explore the idea of time and memories.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bonnard lived with his partner Marthe de Meligny for 30 years before they got married in 1925, Man and Woman 1900 seems to celebrate their unconventional lifestyle and many of the artist’s early paintings featured Marthe in domestic scenes or vibrant landscapes  like Dining Room in the Country 1913, The Lane at Vernonnet 1912-14 and Coffee 1915.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Marthe was often the model for a series of nude studies especially that often involved water like Nude in the Bath 1936, and Nude crouching in tub 1918.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bonnard bought his first car in 1911 and travelled extensively all over France, on these trips he developed his work on landscapes. His landscapes like Summer 1917 were generally more concerned with colour than just representation. Bonnard often visited Monet at Giverny and was inspired by the large water-lily canvases.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the First World War, the death of his mother led Bonnard to work on a series of domestic scenes often centred around meals, The Bowl of Milk 1919 illustrates how Bonnard was using different perspectives to record domestic scenes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

His house in Vernonnet in Normandy was a constant inspiration where he could explore the relationship between man-made and natural environments. These studies led a more abstract approach with The Violet Fence 1922 and Studio with Mimosa 1939-46 .

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition concludes with a group of works created towards the end of Bonnard’s life, while spending the Second World War in Le Cannet in the South of France.  The war led the artist to look back on a lifetime of memories and create works that showed the beauty of the world and not the horror and  devastation.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition offers the opportunity to study the works of Pierre Bonnard, although often overshadowed by other French painters of the period, Bonnard deserves to be recognised for this own unique style. Bonnard’s use of intense colours and modern compositions inspired many later artists to experiment with capturing fleeting moments, memories and emotions on canvas. In a period in which the world was tearing itself apart, Bonnard concentrated on the small pleasures of everyday life that enabled himself and other people to survive the severe political and social turmoil. 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here