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Maria Bartuszová at the Tate Modern from 20 September 2022 to 16 April 2023

Tate Modern will present the UK’s first major exhibition of the work of Maria Bartuszová (1936-1996), an artist who created a world of sculpture on her own terms using innovative methods in plaster casting. From raindrops and eggs to the human body, Bartuszová took inspiration from organic forms and cycles in the natural world. Spanning the breadth of her remarkable 30-year career, this show will reveal a prolific body of tactile, sensual, and evocative sculptures, shaped by the artist’s personal experiences and deep love of nature.

Bringing together over 50 of Bartuszová’s delicate plaster works alongside bronze casts and aluminium reliefs, many of which have never been shown in this country before it will offer a rare chance to discover how this little-known artist created her own world of abstract sculpture.

Although born in Prague, Bartuszová spent the majority of her career in Košice, the second largest city in what was then Czechoslovakia, near the border with Hungary and Ukraine. Closed off from direct contact with European and global events during the Cold War, she worked in relative seclusion, with few opportunities to exhibit during her lifetime. Despite this, Bartuszová built an outstanding legacy of around 500 sculptures which remain a testament to her unique vision and persistent experimentation.

The exhibition will explore how Bartuszová worked inventively and quickly, using the fleeting and liquid process of casting to create simultaneously solid and delicate artworks. In the early 1960s, she created abstract shapes by pouring plaster into rubber balloons and moulding it using pressure and tension, a method she coined ‘gravistimulation’.

Maria Batuszová in her studio in Košice, Slovakia, with her sculptures c.1987 – photo: Gabriel Kladek

Experimenting further in the 1980s, Bartuszová developed a new practice of plaster shaping she termed ‘pneumatic casting’, in which she blew air into balloons and poured plaster over their surface. This created empty, negative volumes and ever more fragile, hollow shapes resembling shells and eggs – described by the artist as “a tiny void full of a tiny infinite universe”. Works from Bartuszová’s Endless Egg series will be displayed alongside elaborate eggshell clusters such as Untitled (1984), expressing feelings of personal crisis in their fragility and destruction.

Bartuszová continually explored ways in which sculpture could engage the imagination and activate the senses. In the mid-1960s she began creating plaster sculptures composed of interlocking shapes, such as Folded Figure (1965), and later bronze and aluminium puzzle-like sculptures such as Folded Figure, Horizontal, Haptic, (1974 cast 1975) which could be taken apart and reassembled to spark creative thinking. A range of rarely seen archive photographs by art historian and photographer Gabriel Kladek document how her sculptures were innovatively used in expressive workshops for blind and partially sighted children.

The exhibition will also highlight how forms and themes that the artist developed in her studio were brought into public spaces through her state-funded commissions for buildings, monuments, playgrounds and fountains. The elongated droplets of Rain (1963) are echoed in the bronze fountain she created for the Institute for Physically Disabled Children in Košice (1967–71), while her geometric wall-based works inspired her monumental reliefs for the Southern Slovak Paper Mill (1973–5) and Eastern Slovak Steelworks (1974). Visitors will also discover the futuristic models Bartuszová designed for playground climbing frames and slides and explore the making process behind her monumental public sculpture Metamorphosis, Two-Part Sculpture (1982) at the entrance to the Košice crematorium.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

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Surrealism Beyond Borders at Tate Modern from 24 February to 29 August 2022

This ground-breaking exhibition at Tate Modern explores the wide range of this radical Surrealism movement, which very quickly moved beyond the confines of a single time or place. Based on extensive research undertaken by Tate and The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, the exhibition spans 80 years and 50 countries to show how Surrealism inspired and united artists around the globe, from centres as diverse as Buenos Aires, Cairo, Lisbon, Mexico City, Prague, Seoul and Tokyo. Expanding our understanding of Surrealism, Tate Modern will show how this dynamic movement took root in many places at different times, offering artists the freedom to challenge authority and imagine a new world.

Rene Magritte – Time Transfixed 1938 The Art Institute of Chicago, Joseph Winterbotham Collection,

Surrealism had its origins in Paris in the 1920s, Surrealism prioritised the unconscious and dreams using humorous works like Salvador Dalí’s Lobster Telephone to René Magritte’s train rushing from a fireplace to challenge views of reality. It soon was used by artists around the world as a serious weapon in the struggle for political, social, and personal freedom.

Remedios Varo – To The Tower 1961. Private collection (c) DACS, 2021

The exhibition feates over 150 works ranging from painting and photography to sculpture and film, many of which have never been shown in the UK, this exhibition explores the collective interests shared by artists across regions and considers the conditions under which they worked and how this in turn impacted Surrealism. Among the rarely seen works are photographs by Cecilia Porras and Enrique Grau, as well as paintings by exiled Spanish artist Eugenio Granell.

Toshiko Okanoue – The Call 1953. Wilson Centre for Photography

Visitors will see iconic paintings such as Max Ernst’s Two Children are Threatened by a Nightingale 1924 alongside lesser known but significant works including Antonio Berni’s Landru in the Hotel, Paris 1932, which appeared in the artist’s first exhibition of Surrealist works in Argentina, and Toshiko Okanoue’s Yobi-goe (The Call) 1954, addressing the daily experience of post-war Japan. Photographs by Hans Bellmer focusing on the female body are contrasted with Ithell Colquhoun’s Scylla 1938 a double image exploring female desire and works by both French Surrealist Claude Cahun and Sri-Lankan-based artist Lionel Wendt.

Kati Horna Untitled from Woman with Masks (Series) Mexico 1963 © Kati Horna Estate. Courtesy Michael Hoppen Gallery

The exhibition also considers the locations around the world where artists have converged and exchanged ideas of Surrealism. From Paris at the Bureau of Surrealist Research; to Cairo, with the Art et Liberté group; across the Caribbean, where the movement was initiated by writers; in Mexico City, where it was shaped by the creative bonds of women artists; and Chicago, where Surrealism was used as a tool for radical politics. Special loans including the photographs of Limb Eung-Sik and Jung Haechang from Korea and a film by Len Lye from New Zealand, will offer further insight into the adaption of Surrealism across the globe. For the first time in the UK, Ted Joans’ 36-foot drawing, Long Distance 1976-2005 will go on display, featuring 132 contributors from around the world. Accompanying Joans on his travels, this cadavre exquis (exquisite corpse) drawing took nearly 30 years to complete and united artists located as far apart as Lagos and Toronto.

Surrealism Beyond Borders is organised by Tate Modern and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

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Lubaina Himid at Tate Modern from 25 November 2021 to 3 July 2022

Between the Two my Heart is Balanced, 1991
Tate
© Lubaina Himid

Over four decades, Lubaina Himid’s work has made her an increasingly influential figure in contemporary art from her role in the British Black arts movement of the 1980s to winning the Turner Prize in 2017. Tate Modern presents Himid’s largest solo exhibition to date, incorporating new paintings and significant highlights from across her career. Taking inspiration from the artist’s interest in opera and her training in theatre design, the show unfolds across a sequence of scenes which put the visitor centre-stage.

Lubaina Himid
A Fashionable Marriage, 1986
installation view, 2017 © Nottingham Contemporary
Photo: Andy Keate
Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens

The exhibition presents over 50 works that bring together painting, everyday objects, poetic texts and sound. Early installations including the well-known A Fashionable Marriage 1984 will enter into a dialogue with recent works such as her series of large format paintings Le Rodeur 2016-18, while new paintings created during lockdown will go on public display for the first time.

An early fascination with pattern, influenced by her mother’s career as a textile designer, has always been central to Himid’s work. A series of suspended cloth flags inspired by East African kanga textiles will welcome visitors to the exhibition at Tate Modern.

Lubaina Himid
There Could Be an Endless Ocean 2018
Courtesy the artist and Hollybush Gardens

Throughout her career, Himid has explored and expanded the possibilities of storytelling, encouraging the viewer to become an active participant in her work. A fictional architecture competition inspires the installation Jelly Mould Pavilions for Liverpool 2010, in which a series of hand-painted ceramic models celebrate the contributions of the African diaspora and invite viewers to reflect on the role of monuments in public space. Displayed at Tate Modern alongside a range of works including Metal Handkerchiefs 2019 in a room addressing architecture and the built environment, Himid poses the question: ‘We live in clothes, we live in buildings. Do they fit us?’

© Lubaina Himid

A major highlight of the exhibition will be the presence of sound installations, including Blue Grid Test 2020, created by Himid in collaboration with artist Magda Stawarska-Beavan. Displayed in the UK for the first time, this 25-metre-long painting features 64 patterns from all over the world, each painted a different shade of blue on top of a variety of objects pinned to the gallery walls. Coupled with a sound installation layering instrumental music with Himid’s voice, the work creates a visual and sonic embrace.

The show will culminate in a group of recent paintings and painted objects, which centre on extraordinary moments of everyday life which are rarely portrayed. The series Men in Drawers 2017-19 features tender portraits of imaginary figures inside vintage wooden furniture, while works like Cover the Surface 2019 depict intimate interactions and moments of indecision between men. Himid also continues to explore women’s creativity in her recent paintings, including The Operating Table 2019.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Sophie Taeuber-Arp at Tate Modern from 15 July to 17 October 2021

Tate Modern’s presents a major exhibition of the work of Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889-1943), this exhibition is the first in the UK to trace Taeuber-Arp’s as a painter, architect, teacher, writer, and designer of textiles, marionettes and interiors.

The exhibition brings together over 200 objects from collections across Europe and America, and provides evidence that Taeuber-Arp was one of the most innovative artists and designers of the 20th-century avant-garde challenging the borders between abstract art, design and craft.

After studying fine and applied arts in Munich, Sophie Taeuber-Arp began her career in Zurich, which became an international hub for the avant-garde during the First World War.

She became a successful textile practitioner and teacher whilst experimenting with non-figurative art. Her use of geometric shapes and grids plus the use of vibrant bold colours helped her to develop her own particular style which decorative artworks including beaded bags, jewellery, rugs, pillowcases and tapestries.

By the end of the war, Taeuber-Arp had become active within Zurich dada, the short-lived but influential artistic movement which sought to integrate abstraction and absurdity. The exhibition features her turned-wood ‘Dada Heads’.

She also embraced the performance side of dada, dancing at the legendary Cabaret Voltaire and creating marionettes for the avant-garde interpretation of the play ‘King Stag’. All of the original marionettes are on display at Tate Modern in the exhibition.

In the 1920s Taeuber-Arp explored the possibility of working on architecture and interior design for private houses and public buildings. The exhibition includes designs and furniture from these projects, such as the commission for the Aubette, a modernist entertainment complex in Strasbourg, created in collaboration with Arp and Theo Van Doesburg.

The commercial success of her architectural practice enabled Taeuber-Arp to design her own studio-house near Paris, which would become a focal point for international intellectuals such as Tristan Tzara, Max Ernst and James Joyce.

Taeuber-Arp’s involvement in the Parisian art scene prompted a return to painting in the late 1920s. She experimented with primary colours and abstract forms, going on to develop a series of compositions of rectangles and circles in the 1930s.

Fleeing Paris at the outbreak of the Second World War, Taeuber-Arp turned to drawing, the final room of the exhibition brings together the works she made while on the move and in exile, created before her tragic accidental death in 1943 aged 53.

This fascinating exhibition illustrates the considerable talents of Sophie Taeuber-Arp, unlike many artists of the period Taeuber-Arp explored practical applications of her artwork in many different types of media. These decorative artworks and the artist’s commercial nous may be one of the reasons that Taeuber-Arp is largely unknown. Many artists that bought together arts, crafts and fine art were often dismissed by the art world as designers not artists.

This exhibition, hopefully will address some of these narrow minded views of what Art is ? And promote the creative talents of a woman who followed her own artistic path to great effect.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Making of Rodin at Tate Modern from 29 April to 31 October 2021

 

Tate Modern will present a major new exhibition of Auguste Rodin (1840-1917). It will show how he broke the rules of classical sculpture to create a dramatically different image of the human body, illustrating the uncertainties of the modern age. Featuring over 200 works, many of which have never been shown outside France, The Making of Rodin will offer unique insight into Rodin’s ways of thinking and making. In a unique collaboration with the Musée Rodin, Tate visitors will be able to both appreciate the originality of iconic works such as The Thinker 1881 and The Three Shades 1886 as well as make fresh discoveries that reveal how the artist transformed modern sculpture.

Although Rodin is best known for his bronze and marble sculptures, he personally only worked as a modeller, capturing movement, emotion, light and volume in pliable materials such as clay which were then cast in plaster. The Making of Rodin is the first show to focus in-depth on Rodin’s use of plaster, taking inspiration from the artist’s landmark self-organised exhibition at the Pavillon de l’Alma in 1900. It was here that Rodin made the unconventional decision to display his life’s work almost entirely in plaster, emphasising the crucial role the medium played in his career. Many of the star exhibits of 1900 such as the monumental casts of Balzac 1898 or La Meditation 1896 will be shown at Tate Modern in a rare reunion.

The exhibition will also evoke the atmosphere of the Pavillon de l’Alma, which in turn had riffed on an imaginary vision of the artist’s studio. Rather than show a workshop populated by models, carvers, casters, photographers and founders who turned Rodin’s creations and vision into traditional commercial sculptures, it foregrounded modelling and the notion of the ‘artist’s hand’ as the central drivers for Rodin’s work. A stockpile of plaster body parts on loan from the Musée Rodin will reveal how he continually experimented with fragmentation, repetition and joining existing parts in unconventional ways. Individually crafted heads, hands, arms, legs and feet allowed him to dismantle and reassemble his works time and again in countless combinations and poses. The exhibition will explore how these experiments went on to influence some of the artist’s best-known sculptures, including the newly restored plaster for The Burghers of Calais 1889 displayed as Rodin had originally intended.

The complex dynamics of Rodin’s work with different models will be considered from the perspective of some of the extraordinary women with whom he worked, including his onetime studio assistant and collaborator Camille Claudel. Rodin strongly responded to the individual character and physicality of his models. This is especially evident in his numerous portraits of the actress Ohta Hisa (1868-1945). Busts depicting Rodin’s friend and correspondent, the German aristocrat Helene Von Nostitz née Hindenburg (1878–1944), also illustrate how he embraced visible traces of his work’s creation, believing the ‘process’ to be as significant as the finished form.

Archival images, many of which Rodin chose to display alongside his plaster works at the Pavillon de l’Alma, will show how he used photography to explore combinations of forms and analyse his sculptures from multiple viewpoints. These will be joined by a series of the artist’s watercolour drawings in which he further experimented and re-worked bodily forms.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Exhibition Review: Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern from 7 October 2020 to 21 February 2021

Tate Modern presents the first exhibition to show the full breadth of work by Bruce Nauman in London for more than 20 years. Nauman’s body of work encompasses a range of media including sculpture, sound, film, video and neon.

Since the late 1960s, Nauman has been known for inventing new ways to tell his narratives. He is now widely recognised as one of the most innovative and influential artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The exhibition features more than 40 works, the exhibition explores a number of themes that have preoccupied Nauman during his 50-year career.

The exhibition begins with MAPPING THE STUDIO II with color shift, flip, flop & flip/flop (Fat Chance John Cage) 2001, a major moving-image installation .

A selection of early and iconic artworks such as Henry Moore Bound to Fail 1967/70 and A Cast of the Space Under My Chair 1965/68 highlights Nauman’s interest in conceptual art and performance.

Nauman has created several neon signs that combine text and colour to reveal everyday phrases and expressions. Some examples in the exhibition include The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truth (Window or Wall Sign) 1967, Human Nature Knows/Doesn’t Know 1983/86 and One Hundred Live and Die 1984.

Large-scale works such as Going Around the Corner Piece with Live and Taped Monitors 1970 and Double Steel Cage Piece 1974 reflect Nauman’s interest in surveillance and over zealous societal control.

These themes continue in the whole-room installation Shadow Puppets and Instructed Mime 1990 in which suspended wax heads, sound and video, provide a backdrop as a disembodied male voice gives commands to a female mime projected onto the walls.

Anthro/Socio (Rinde Spinning) 1992 reveals how Nauman consistently challenges the conventions of the gallery experience and confronts viewers directly.

Black Marble Under Yellow Light 1981/1988 illustrates how Nauman explores space and light.

Falls, Pratfalls and Sleights of Hand (Clean Version) 1993, the final room in the show, illustrates how themes of human perception have inspired Nauman throughout his career.

This imaginative exhibition provides plenty of evidence of how Nauman was one of the early artists to explore some of the effects of the digital revolution and how it would affect our perception of our physical and psychological place in the world. Many of the installations present an unnerving view of the future where humans are almost a ghost in the machine desperate to be heard but forever being distorted.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern from 7 October 2020 to 21 February 2021

Tate Modern will present the first exhibition to show the full breadth of work by Bruce Nauman in London for more than 20 years. Nauman’s ground-breaking body of work encompasses a range of media including sculpture, sound, film, video and neon. Since the late 1960s, he has continually tested and reinvented what an artwork can be by reshaping traditional forms and creating new ones. He is now widely recognised as one of the most innovative and influential artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

Through more than 40 works, the exhibition will explore the distinctive themes that have preoccupied Nauman during his 50-year career. Unfolding across a sequence of immersive installations inviting viewer engagement, the show will acknowledge how Nauman’s works contrast the instant gratification of today’s screen-based information and entertainment culture. It will also reveal how Nauman has transformed the way we think about art by exploring our understanding of language and perception of our physical and psychological place in the world.

Following a non-chronological structure, the opening room will present visitors with MAPPING THE STUDIO II with color shift, flip, flop & flip/flop (Fat Chance John Cage) 2001, a major moving-image installation that embodies Nauman’s radical re-examination of the artist’s studio. A selection of early and iconic artworks such as Henry Moore Bound to Fail 1967/70 and A Cast of the Space Under My Chair 1965/68 will highlight Nauman’s conceptual and often performative approach towards sculpture, the body and studio practice.

Inspired by a chance encounter with a neon advertisement left over in his San Francisco studio, Nauman created several ground-breaking neon signs that combine text and colour to reveal the ambiguities beneath everyday phrases and expressions. A number of outstanding examples will be brought together for this exhibition, including The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truth (Window or Wall Sign) 1967, Human Nature Knows/Doesn’t Know 1983/86 and One Hundred Live and Die 1984.

Large-scale works such as Going Around the Corner Piece with Live and Taped Monitors 1970 and Double Steel Cage Piece 1974 reflect Nauman’s interest in surveillance and societal control. These themes extend to the whole-room installation Shadow Puppets and Instructed Mime 1990 in which suspended wax heads, sound and video, provide a backdrop as a disembodied male voice gives commands to a female mime projected onto the walls. One of Nauman’s most aurally and conceptually powerful works Anthro/Socio (Rinde Spinning) 1992 reveals how Nauman consistently challenges the conventions of the gallery experience and confronts viewers directly with their own physical presence. Black Marble Under Yellow Light 1981/1988 provides an encounter with Nauman’s unsettling manipulation of space and light, while Falls, Pratfalls and Sleights of Hand (Clean Version) 1993, the final room in the show, acknowledges the themes of bodily presence and human perception that have engaged Nauman throughout his career.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Tate to Reopen all its Galleries on 27 July 2020

Tate today announced that it plans to reopen all four of its galleries on 27 July 2020. People will once again be able to visit the national collection of art on display at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives.

Guided by the latest official advice, Tate is currently working hard on its preparations to welcome the public back to its galleries. To manage numbers and ensure everyone can keep a safe distance from each other, all visitors, including Members, will need to book a timed ticket online in advance. Tickets will be available from next week at tate.org.uk alongside the latest information and guidance on how to visit.

As well as the collection displays at all four Tate galleries, Tate Modern will reopen with Andy Warhol and Kara Walker’s Hyundai Commission Fons Americanus and Tate Britain will reopen with Aubrey Beardsley and Steve McQueen’s Year 3 installation.

As a result of the closure, some of Tate’s upcoming exhibition programme has been modified. This autumn, Tate Britain will open Turner’s Modern World and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, while Tate Modern will open Zanele Muholi and Bruce Nauman. Some exhibitions have been rescheduled to 2021, with new dates to be announced in due course. Talks, workshops, performances and film screenings will be replaced with a new programme of online events for the duration of this year.

TATE MODERN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

ANDY WARHOL
UNTIL 6 SEP 2020

HYUNDAI COMMISSION: KARA WALKER FONS AMERICANUS
UNTIL 8 NOV 2020

BRUCE NAUMAN
7 OCT 2020 – 21 FEB 2021

ZANELE MUHOLI
5 NOV 2020 – 14 MAR 2021

TATE BRITAIN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

AUBREY BEARDSLEY
UNTIL 20 SEP 2020

STEVE MCQUEEN YEAR 3
UNTIL 31 JAN 2021

TURNER’S MODERN WORLD
28 OCT 2020 – 7 MAR 2021

LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE
18 NOV 2020 – 9 MAY 2021

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Andy Warhol at Tate Modern from 12 March to 6 September 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents an exhibition which features the work of Andy Warhol (1928–87), the exhibition is the first at the gallery for almost 20 years and explores the man behind the image.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features over 100 works from across his career and provides some insights into how Warhol’s personal experiences led to his unique take on American 20th century culture.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Born Andrew Warhola, he grew up in Pittsburgh to parents who emigrated from a small village in the north-east of the former Czechoslovak Republic. The Warhola family were devout followers of the Byzantine Ruthenian Catholic Church, and the impact of the strong religious conviction of his mother Julia Warhola especially on the artist is considered an important influence in his life. The exhibition also examines how Warhol’s sexuality influenced his work starting with a selection of his evocative early line drawings of male portraits and nudes from the 1950s.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Both in personality and sexuality, Warhol considered himself an outsider and was attracted to those on the margins of American society.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of his early works is the film Sleep 1963 which documents Warhol’s lover at the time.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Warhol is best known for his iconic paintings of Campbell Soup cans, Coca-Cola bottles and Marilyn Monroe prints which provided an unique take on American consumerism and culture. Key works from the pop period are included the exhibition, such as Marilyn Diptych 1962, Elvis I and II 1963/1964 and Race Riot 1964.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is also a recreation of the psychedelic multimedia environment of Exploding Plastic Inevitable 1966, originally produced for the Velvet Underground rock shows.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors will also be able to experience Warhol’s floating Silver Clouds 1966 installation, initially meant to signal his ‘retirement’ from painting in favour of moviemaking.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It was around this time that Warhol set up the Factory and became interested in underground filmmaking, between 1963 to 1967, Warhol and his collaborators made around 500 films that generally featured the various personalities that spent their time in the Factory.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Following his shooting by Valerie Solanas in 1968, Warhol returned to large-scale painting projects and the exhibition includes the largest grouping of his 1975 Ladies and Gentlemen series ever shown in the UK. These striking portraits depict figures from New York’s transgender community.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition ends with one of Warhol’s final works from the 80s,the poignant Sixty Last Suppers 1986 on view at Tate Modern for the first time in this country which is said to reflect how the HIV/AIDS epidemic impacted on the lives of many in his close circle.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Perhaps one of the more bizarre exhibits is three of Warhol’s wigs on loan from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition explores the multilayered world of Andy Warhol who charted the immense social, political and technological change of America by creating works of art that mirrored some of the methods of American consumerism. However, the exhibition does illustrate that Warhol had a particular affection for those ‘outsiders’ who were finding their own desires, identity and belief. Warhol was not only recording his own period, he was providing a glimpse of the future where art becomes part of the mainstream consumer society and many people would seek to have their ’15 minutes of fame.’

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Steve McQueen at Tate Modern from 13 February to 11 May 2020

Steve McQueen, Charlotte 2004, Film still © Steve McQueen. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

Tate Modern presents the first survey of Steve McQueen’s work in the UK for over 20 years, it features 14 major works spanning film, photography and sculpture, and explores McQueen’s visual art career since he received the Turner Prize in 1999.

McQueen is also a critically acclaimed filmmaker creating Hunger (2008), Shame (2010), 12 Years a Slave (2013) and Widows (2018). The exhibition reveals how McQueen’s pioneering approaches to filmmaking have influenced how other artists work with the medium.

Steve McQueen, Exodus 1992-97, Video still © Steve McQueen. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

Highlights of the exhibition include one of McQueen’s earliest films shot on a Super 8 camera, Exodus 1992/97, which reflects on migration and multiculturalism in London, and 7th Nov. 2001, in which the artist’s cousin Marcus recounts the tragic day he accidentally shot and fatally injured his own brother.

Steve McQueen, Static 2009, Video still© Steve McQueen. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

These intimate works are in contrast to large-scale video installations such as Western Deep 2002 and Static 2009. Western Deep presents an intense exploration of the labour conditions of gold miners in South Africa, while Static’s aerial depiction of the Statue of Liberty shows a different aspect of a familiar and heavily symbolic figure.

Steve McQueen, Caribs’ Leap 2002, Video still© Steve McQueen. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

As part of the exhibition McQueen has chosen to display one of the screens of the two-channel film Caribs’ Leap 2002 on the river façade of Tate Modern. Shown on a giant 7 metre screen Caribs’ Leap traces a day on the Caribbean island of Grenada, portraying the cycle of life and death.

Steve McQueen, Ashes 2002-2015, Video still © Steve McQueen. Courtesy the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery and Marian Goodman Gallery

More recent work includes the haunting two-channel video installation Ashes 2002–15, offering a moving tribute to the memory of a young fisherman the artist met and filmed in Grenada in 2002, who was killed by drug dealers the following year.

For the first time in the UK, audiences can view End Credits 2012–ongoing, McQueen’s homage to the African-American singer, actor and civil rights activist Paul Robeson (1898–1976) who, after a successful career as a performer, was blacklisted in the 1950s and put under surveillance by the FBI. The work consists of rolling slides of the FBI’s reports on Robeson with a soundtrack of voices reading from the heavily-redacted documents.

The exhibition also features Weight 2016, a sculpture first exhibited at the recently closed Reading Gaol, where Oscar Wilde had been imprisoned and wrote De Profundis. A gold-plated mosquito net draped over one of the prison’s metal bedframes create a shimmering apparition.

Steve McQueen at Tate Modern runs from 13 February to 11 May 2020

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

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