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Display Review: Prince and Patron at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace – 21st July to 30th September 2018


Each year, Buckingham Palace opens its doors to visitors to explore The State Rooms at the palace. This year there is a special display of over 100 works of art personally selected by The Prince of Wales to mark His Royal Highness’s 70th birthday year.

The display entitled Prince & Patron presents a wide range of paintings, decorative arts, works on paper, furniture and textiles from the Royal Collection and the work of artists supported by three of The Prince’s charities – The Royal Drawing School, The Prince’s Foundation School of Traditional Arts and Turquoise Mountain.

The display reflects the Prince of Wales life-long passion for art and his passion for promoting the creation and understanding of art. The Prince’s interest in art developed while growing up surrounded by the Royal Collection and for this display he has selected a number of works from the collection including 16th-century portrait drawings by Hans Holbein the Younger; Georges de la Tour’s painting Saint Jerome, c.1621–23; and a tiger’s head in gold and rock crystal (1785–93) from the throne of Tipu Sultan, ruler of Mysore in India.

Other highlights of the display include Napoleon’s cloak, Landseer’s portrait of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, an early 18th century Italian Bureau cabinet, Bassano’s The Adoration of the Shepherds and Zoffany’s The Tribuna of the Uffizi.

On a more personal level, the display includes two oil sketches of The Prince and The Duchess of Cornwall by Eileen Hogan, sketches of Prince William and Prince Harry, a triple portrait of the Prince of Wales by Susan Crawford, paintings of the Queen and Queen Mother by Michael Noakes and two watercolours of Balmoral painted by the Prince of Wales.

To celebrate the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain in 2010, The Prince commissioned a series of drawings of veterans by alumni and faculty members of The Royal Drawing School. Four drawings from The Last of the Few series are included in the display.

The Prince of Wales is a strong advocate for the promotion of artistry and craftsmanship and selected recently visited the final degree show of The Prince’s Foundation School of Traditional Arts and selected Hannah Rose Thomas’s three portraits of Yezidi women for the Prince & Patron exhibition.

The display celebrates the Prince’s interest in  Eastern and Arabic art with a number of works in various media, the most spectacular is located in the centre of the Palace’s Ball Supper Room, it is a striking 2.3-metre-high cedar wood pavilion created by classical carver Naseer Yasna (Mansouri) and the woodwork team at Turquoise Mountain. The pavilion’s intricate carvings draw on the rich heritage of Afghan design and demonstrate how the charity is reviving traditional skills in historic communities.

This fascinating and eclectic display provides some insight into the personality of the Prince of Wales in his 70th birthday year, a constant theme is his admiration for high quality workmanship both in this country and around the world. The display is a strange mix of public and private which perhaps illustrates the pleasures and difficulties of trying to maintain some normality being surrounded by artistic treasures and public attention. Many of the works have been commissioned by the Prince or produced by artists supported by three of The Prince’s charities, this role of patron is a lesser known aspect of the Prince’s work which perhaps deserves wider recognition.

Prince & Patron is part of a visit to the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, 21 July – 30 September 2018.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Mantegna and Bellini at the National Gallery – 1st October 2018 to 27th January 2019

In autumn 2018, the National Gallery will present a tale of two artists, their families and their cities; an interlinked story of art, family, rivalry, marriage, pragmatism, and personality – Mantegna and Bellini.

This exhibition is the first ever devoted to the relationship between two of the greatest artists of the Italian Renaissance: Giovanni Bellini (active about 1459–1516) and Andrea Mantegna (1430/1–1506). Through exceptionally rare loans of paintings, drawings, and sculpture, travelling to London from across the world, Mantegna and Bellini offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to compare the work of these two important artists who also happened to be brothers-in-law.

Neither’s career or artistic development would have existed without the other, and without these works imbued with their creativity and innovation, Renaissance art, by the likes of Titian, Correggio, and Veronese, would not exist as it does today.

The son of a carpenter, Andrea Mantegna was a self-made man. In 1453 the prodigiously talented young painter from Padua, married into the greatest artistic family of nearby Venice – the Bellini. Mantegna’s new brother-in-law, Giovanni Bellini, was also a gifted artist who was bringing new innovations to the Venetian use of colour, observed light, atmosphere, and landscape to create an entirely new form of art. Their admiration and respect were mutual.

For seven years Mantegna and Bellini worked in close creative dialogue – something visitors to the exhibition will be able to observe at first hand through key groupings of subjects both artists portrayed. Inspired by each other’s example, they both experimented and worked in ways they were not entirely comfortable with in order to hone their artistic skills and identities. While Mantegna exemplified the intellectual artist, Bellini was the archetypal landscape painter, the first to use the natural world to convey emotion.

In 1460, Mantegna decided to pursue his own artistic path and moved to Mantua, where he occupied the post of court painter to the ruling Gonzaga family until his death in 1506. Bellini, who died 10 years after Mantegna, spent his entire career in Republican Venice.  Despite the distance between them, their creative exchange continued throughout their long lives. Each artist continued to scale new heights in skill and ingenuity but remained forever shaped by their time together and by the knowledge of the other’s work and achievements.

At the core of the exhibition are two historic juxtapositions of Mantegna and Bellini’s work: depictions of The Agony in the Garden, (Mantegna’s about 1458-60, Bellini’s’ about 1465) which have hung side by side in the National Gallery since the late 19th century, as well as two paintings of The Presentation of Christ to the Temple (Mantegna’s version of which is in the Gemäldegalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin) and Bellini’s in the Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Venice).

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Smithfield 150 on 25th and 26th August 2018


Culture Mile will celebrate August Bank Holiday with two day festival thanks to St Bartholomew. Smithfield 150 will revive the spirit of medieval festival, a forerunner for the annual public holiday

The free festival will be curated by the Museum of London and inspired by the medieval extravaganza Bartholomew’s Fair, the festival will take over the markets and surrounding Smithfield streets to celebrate the market’s 150th anniversary. The original fair, which took place over three days and celebrated St Bartholomew’s Feast Day on 24th August each year, became one of London’s most famous holidays, and is considered a forerunner for the August Bank Holiday we know today.

Smithfield 150 invites the whole of London to celebrate the history and people that make Smithfield such a special area with a jam-packed programme of music, food, performance and entertainment for all the family. On Saturday 25 August, visitors will enjoy London’s Biggest Birthday Party which will include a special area for families with under 5s, massive party games, party food galore, fun fairs and lots of surprises along the way.

Sunday 26 August will celebrate the great tradition of the Sunday Lunch, with the best of the surrounding market’s produce sharing food from around the world. Take part in a giant communal feast, listen to live music, bring the kids to a pop-up roller skating disco, or join in with the choir for a mass sing-a-long.

One hundred and fifty years ago the newly redesigned Smithfield meat market, which is owned and managed by the City of London Corporation, was officially opened after years of redevelopment. Designed by acclaimed architect Sir Horace Jones, the new market was the talk of London, and restored the market’s position in the heart of the bustling City.

 Culture Mile, which was launched last July, is an ambitious and transformational initiative that will create a vibrant cultural area in the north-west corner of the City over the next 10 to 15 years. Stretching just under a mile from Farringdon to Moorgate, Culture Mile will have creative exchange, cultural collaboration and learning at its core in an area where 2,000 years of history collide with the world’s best in culture.

For more information, visit the Smithfield 150 website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Victoria and Albert Museum announces largest ever Christian Dior exhibition in the UK from 2nd February to 14th July 2019


Yves Saint Laurent in front of Christian Dior London, 11th November 1958. © Popperfoto, Getty Images

In February 2019, the V&A will open the largest and most comprehensive exhibition ever staged in the UK on the House of Dior – the museum’s biggest fashion exhibition since Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015.

Spanning 1947 to the present day, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will trace the history and impact of one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him, to explore the enduring influence of the fashion house.

Écarlate afternoon dress, Autumn-Winter 1955 Haute Couture collection, Y line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve, organised by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, the exhibition will be reimagined for the V&A. A brand-new section will, for the first time, explore the designer’s fascination with British culture. Dior admired the grandeur of the great houses and gardens of Britain, as well as British-designed ocean liners, including the Queen Mary. He also had a preference for Savile Row suits. In 1947, he hosted his first UK fashion show at London’s Savoy Hotel, and in 1952 established Christian Dior London. This exhibition will investigate Dior’s creative collaborations with influential British manufacturers, and his most notable British clients, from author Nancy Mitford to ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn.

A highlight will be the Christian Dior dress worn by Princess Margaret for her 21st birthday celebrations, generously on loan from the Museum of London. It will also bring to life Dior’s spectacular fashion shows staged in the UK’s most luxurious stately homes, including Blenheim Palace in 1954.

Pérou short evening dress, Autumn-Winter 1954 Haute Couture collection, H line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Gift of Cecil Beaton. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Drawn from the extensive Dior Archives, the exhibition will also showcase highlights from the V&A’s world-class Couture collections, including the iconic Bar Suit, gifted to the museum by the House of Dior in 1960. The exhibition will present over 500 objects, with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, perfume, make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions.

The exhibition will highlight Dior’s vision of femininity, encompassing garments, accessories and fragrances. Flowers are emblematic of the Couture House and have inspired silhouettes, embroidery and prints but also the launch of Miss Dior in 1947, the first fragrance created alongside the very first show.

From horticulture to global travel and 18th century decorative arts, the show will reveal the sources of inspiration that defined the House of Dior’s aesthetic. From the daring designs of Yves Saint Laurent to the rational style of Marc Bohan, the flamboyance of Gianfranco Ferré, the exuberance of John Galliano, the minimalism of Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri’s feminist vision of fashion, the exhibition will show how each successive artistic director has stayed true to Dior’s vision of Haute Couture, while bringing their own creative sensibilities to the House.

The exhibition Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams runs from 2 February – 14 July 2019. Tickets will go on sale in Autumn 2018.

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Life in the Dark at the Natural History Museum – 13th July 2018 to 6th January 2019

The Natural History Museum presents a new exhibition entitled Life in the Dark which explores the darkest corners of our world to find the remarkable animals that flourish in conditions that humans would struggle to survive.

The exhibition begins with a large animated display that invites visitors to recognise a familiar nocturnal world populated by owls, foxes and badgers. Unusually a number of the exhibits are there for people to touch and feel. Underlying the exhibition is how creatures have developed extraordinary senses and behaviours in order to survive and thrive in the dark.

Many will be familiar with some of the strategies that woodland creatures use to hunt at night especially bats use of echo location, however as you progress into the exhibition you descend into the more unfamiliar nocturnal worlds of caves, deep seas and oceans.

The exhibition recreates a bat cave with its distinctive aromas and sounds. It is within caves that hundreds of incredible creatures, some brand new to science have been discovered. This has been made possible with technological advances in diving equipment and knowledge of some of the most remote caves.

One of the highlights of the exhibition are live Mexican blind cave fish that have evolved other senses, so don’t need eyes to navigate. Film footage illustrates that cave diving can be very dangerous as recent events in Thailand have shown.

Technology has also played a part in allowing devices to descend deeper and deeper into the deep sea. Video screens show remarkable footage of unusual creatures including the rather comical Dumbo octopus.

At these depths, the use of light is often used to attract prey or fight off predators, one of the last galleries offers a bioluminescence display that recreates some of the extraordinary light displays that can be found in the dark abyss.

The final room brings visitors up to date with some of the latest research regarding creatures that have been discovered in the deep which is providing some answers  into their strategies and behaviour.

This fascinating exhibition takes the visitors into the shadowy nocturnal worlds of the natural world. Using innovative installations, multimedia footage and specimens, the exhibition illustrates the astounding diversity of the natural world in areas that are often off limits to human beings. It is only recently that some of the secrets of the deep have been discovered and the exhibition provides some real insights into the exciting developments in this area.

Life in the Dark has been designed to be as interactive as possible and appeal to both adults and families, the exhibition is free for children 16 years and under with an adult.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the National History Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

The Museum of London acquires a large panorama of London by Pierre Prévost

A panoramic view of London, from the tower of St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster, by Pierre Prevost, Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The Museum of London has acquired a remarkable 20 feet wide panorama of London, painted around 1815 by the French artist Pierre Prévost (1764-1823). It is the preparatory watercolour for a lost, full-scale 30m diameter panorama which was exhibited in Paris in 1817.

A panoramic view of London, from the tower of St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster, by Pierre Prevost, Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The panorama was acquired at auction at Sotheby’s for £200,000. There is only one other work by this artist of a similar size and quality still in existence, a view of Constantinople, which is in the Louvre.

A panoramic view of London, from the tower of St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster, by Pierre Prevost, Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The panorama was painted as the Napoleonic Wars drew to a close, and gives an immersive 360° view of London as the Duke of Wellington would have known it. Looking from the tower of St Margaret’s, the church situated within the shadow of Westminster Abbey, we are presented with a sweeping view over a sunlit city. Dominating the foreground is the Abbey and the old Palace of Westminster (the Houses of Parliament), which burnt down in 1834, and includes the medieval House of Lords chamber, target of the failed Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

A panoramic view of London, from the tower of St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster, by Pierre Prevost, Courtesy of Sotheby’s

Prévost made panoramas of many European cities, but this particular example is thought to have been created at the height of his career. His first panorama of London, now lost, was made when he visited the city during the Peace of Amiens in 1802. He is thought to have returned to London in 1815, shortly after the Battle of Waterloo, to create this amazing image of London.

A panoramic view of London, from the tower of St. Margaret’s Church, Westminster, by Pierre Prevost, Courtesy of Sotheby’s

The panorama provides a snapshot of London just after Waterloo and provides incredible detail of the Westminster area that would be transformed within 30 years of the painting. Unlike today, the panorama shows it was Westminster Abbey that dominated the skyline rather than the Houses of Parliament and the surrounding area is quite spacious with wide open spaces.

The panorama was acquired with the help of Art Fund, the Aldama Foundation and a group of individual donors, with additional support from Michael Spencer, the Leche Trust and other donors who wish to remain anonymous.

If you would like further information, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

 

Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cezanne at the National Gallery – 17th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

For the first time since 1948 the National Gallery will display major Impressionist paintings from the Courtauld Gallery alongside works from its own collections.

This exciting exhibition is made possible thanks to a major loan of works from the Courtauld Gallery, which is closing in September 2018 for a redevelopment. 

Opening at the National Gallery this autumn, Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne will trace the development of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings through a wide ranging survey of over 40 masterpieces from Daumier to Bonnard.

As well as providing the perfect introduction to this art movement, the exhibition will focus on the vision of the Courtauld’s founder Samuel Courtauld. It will focus on his role in shaping national collections and paving the way for the acceptance of modern art in the United Kingdom.

Having purchased works from the first Impressionist exhibition, Samuel Courtauld went on to build one of the world’s most important art collections but stopped acquiring paintings after the death of his wife, revealing a strong emotional connection to the works. 

Highlights from the Courtauld’s collection will include Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergére, Cézanne’s The Card Players and Man with a Pipe, Toulouse-Lautrec’s Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge, putting on her Gloves, Renoir’s La Loge and Seurat’s Young Woman Powdering Herself.

The exhibition unites these works with those the National Gallery acquired in the 1920s through Samuel Courtauld’s fund, such as Cézanne’s Self Portrait, Pissarro’s The Boulevard Montmartre at Night, Renoir’s At the Theatre (La Première Sortie) and Seurat’s Bathers at Asnières. This exhibition is a collaboration between the Courtauld Gallery and National Gallery.

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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