Exhibition Review : Turner Prize 2018 at Tate Britain – 26th September 2018 to 6th January 2019

The Tate Britain presents an exhibition of work by the four artists shortlisted for Turner Prize 2018, the artists are Forensic Architecture, Naeem Mohaiemen, Charlotte Prodger and Luke Willis Thompson.

Forensic Architecture presents its investigations surrounding the Bedouin communities of the Naqab/Negev region of southern Israel.

The videos, photographs and other documentary evidence investigate the events of 18 January 2017, a day on which an attempt by police to clear an unrecognised Bedouin village resulted in the deaths of two people.

Naeem Mohaiemen’s films and installations bring together archives, photographs and interviews that explore ideas of hope and loneliness.

Two Meetings and a Funeral is a documentary film shown on three screens, centring on the power struggle between the Non-Aligned Movement and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation in the 1970s. Tripoli Cancelled is Mohaiemen’s first fiction film, following the daily routine of a man who spends a decade living alone in an abandoned airport.

Charlotte Prodger presents Bridgit which filmed on an iPhone over the course of a year. It is made up of recordings of the Scottish countryside as well as shots from inside Prodger’s home.

Sounds from her environment are overlaid with a narration read by the artist and her friends including extracts from her diaries and books written by figures from queer history.

Luke Willis Thompson works across film, performance and installation. His films examine the relationship between a person and their representation. For the Turner Prize, Thompson presents a trilogy of works on 35mm film: Cemetery of Uniforms and Liveries, autoportrait and _Human.

In these three films, Thompson reframes histories of violence enacted against certain people, and offers counter-images to the media spectacle of our digital age.

Established in 1984, the Turner Prize aims to promote public debate around new developments in contemporary British art. The Prize is often controversial with critics and the public debating the old ‘is it art’ argument, however this year the debate is likely to be more about the lack of diversity with all the shortlisted artists working with the moving image and being ‘issue based’. All this debate often overshadows the works which in 2018 offer a very personal look into the modern world even if they are presented in wider contexts.

The Turner Prize is one of the world’s best-known prizes for the visual arts and the award fund is £40,000 with £25,000 going to the winner and £5,000 each for the other shortlisted artists.

There will be a free entry to the exhibition for everyone aged 25 or under for the first 25 days of the show. The winner will be announced on Tuesday 4 December at an awards ceremony live on the BBC.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

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The Royal Opera House announce Linbury Theatre Season for 2018/2019

The Royal Opera House has announced the first Season’s programme for the Linbury Theatre, the West End’s newest and most intimate theatre, opening in December 2018 after an extensive re-development as part of the Royal Opera House’s Open Up project. The Linbury Theatre incorporates up to 406 seats and is designed as a fully realized new stage for the Royal Opera House to present an exciting array of innovative and engaging new work.

Dance

Olivier Award-winning international ballerina Alessandra Ferri returns to the Linbury Theatre in January 2019, presenting TRIOConcertDance alongside renowned American Ballet Theatre Principal dancer Herman Cornejo and acclaimed concert pianist Bruce Levingston. The show features work by choreographers including Demis Volpi, Russell Maliphant, Wayne McGregor, Herman Cornejo, Fang-Yi Sheu and Angelin Preljocaj, and offers audiences an opportunity to experience the work of these internationally renowned artists in a beautiful and intimate new space.

In February 2019, The Royal Ballet presents New Work New Music, a programme which includes Blue Moon, a new work by acclaimed director and choreographer Aletta Collins, set to a David Sawer score co-commissioned by The Royal Philharmonic Society Drummond Fund and BBC Radio 3 and performed by an ensemble of female dancers from The Royal Ballet. A collaboration with the London Sinfonietta, New Work New Music will offer audiences an opportunity to hear a variety of contrasting music set to dance for the first time, across work by choreographers including Goyo Montero, Royal Ballet Principal Character Artist Kristen McNally, Royal Ballet Soloist Calvin Richardson and Alexander Whitley, who returns to the Royal Opera House after the premiere of his work Noumena in the Clore Studio in November 2017.

In March 2019, National Dance Company Wales present AWAKENING, a programme featuring contemporary works by Fernando Melo, Caroline Finn and Marcos Morau. Afterimage (Melo) is a unique theatrical experience, using a mixture of mirrors and creative choreography; Revellers’ Mass (Finn) depicts an unlikely dinner party and is inspired by old paintings while Tundra (Morau) is an ultra-modern, robotically mesmerizing exploration of Russian folk dance and revolution. In addition, National Dance Company Wales present Discover Dance – a fun and relaxed interactive performance suitable for children and families, offering audience members the chance to dance on stage with NDC Wales dancers and learn excerpts from the Company’s show, followed by a performance of Revellers’ Mass. Also in March, Introdans presents the programme Dutch Masters, containing important items from their signature neoclassical repertory. Returning to the UK for the first time in more than a decade, the company perform a mixed bill, which includes Polish Pieces and Andante by Hans van Manen, Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen by Jiří Kylián and CANTUS by Nils Christe.

The Royal Ballet’s signature International Draft Works programme is presented in the Linbury Theatre in April 2019, and is a forum for choreographers and dancers to explore ideas and present developing work. Submissions will be invited from the UK, Europe and North America’s foremost dance companies and beyond. Each piece will be fully realized, with costumes, set and lighting. The programme offers audiences an opportunity to see choreographic voices of the future develop new and innovative work.

Also in the Linbury Theatre, Ben Duke’s company Lost Dog presents Juliet & Romeo, which runs alongside The Royal Ballet’s revival of Romeo and Juliet. A witty reassessment of Shakespeare’s star-crossed couple as they survive, marry and move into their 40s, Juliet &  Romeo combines dance, theatre and comedy to present a memorable duet mirroring our modern obsessions.

In the Clore Studio, Yorke Dance Project presents Playground by Kenneth MacMillan, 40 years after the work had its premiere at the Edinburgh Festival. Alongside this, Yorke Dance Project will also present a new work by Robert Cohan, Communion, created as the company celebrates its 20th anniversary. Wayne McGregor, a mentee of Cohan, will also join him for a Q&A after the performance. The company will also perform their full anniversary programme including Playground, Communion, a new commission by Los Angeles based choreographer Sophia Stoller and a work by Yolande Yorke-Edgell.

Receiving its UK premiere in May 2019, Canadian company Cas Public’s 9 is produced in collaboration with Belgian company Kopergietery. Choreographed by Hélène Blackburn and set to Martin Tétreault’s overlayed score (based on Beethoven’s Symphony no.9) the piece is inspired by Cas Public performer Cai Glover, who overcame a hearing impairment to become a professional dancer. Suitable for audiences of all ages, 9 utilizes a unique sensory approach to performance, exploring notions of listening to a musical masterpiece without hearing, and transcending boundaries to transform bodies into visual language. Following this, award-winning ballet company Ballet Black returns to the Linbury Theatre with a mixed programme of work, including Cathy Marston’s The Suit.

In June 2019 the Linbury Theatre will host the inaugural Young Talent Festival, presenting performances from some of the world’s leading junior companies and schools. Running from Monday 16 June to Saturday 6 July 2019, the festival includes mixed programmes presented by the Ballett Zürich Junior Company, The Norwegian National Ballet 2, Dutch National Ballet Juniors, Rambert School and The Royal Ballet School. Rambert 2 will also participate with a staging of Kamuyot by Ohad Naharin in the Paul Hamlyn Hall. Completing the festival line-up, participants of the Royal Opera House’s Chance to Dance programme perform their own creative interpretation of Igor Stravinsky’s The Firebird, performing alongside dancers from The Royal Ballet. Running alongside this is the culmination of the annual Young Creatives programme, which cements The Royal Ballet’s commitment to nurturing future generations of dancing talent from across the UK and beyond.

Looking ahead to the 2019/20 Season, The Royal Ballet and Rambert will present Aisha and Abhaya, a co-production in association with BBC Films, directed by ground-breaking London-based filmmaker Kibwe Tavares and choreographed by Sharon Eyal.

Aisha and Abhaya (meaning ‘Hope and Fearlessness’) is a contemporary fairytale about two sisters seeking refuge from their homeland in a fantastical world, which proves to be riven with familiar troubles and dangers. Set to a commissioned score by GAIKA and Ori Lichtik, with costumes by visionary artist Uldus Bakhtiozina, this incredible new dance work combines film, animation and live performance by Rambert’s extraordinary dancers to tell a compelling parable for our times. Originally programmed to open the Linbury Theatre in December 2018, the premiere of Aisha and Abhaya has had to be postponed due to Kibwe Tavares suffering a sudden, unexpected illness.

Opera

The first work presented by The Royal Opera in the Linbury Theatre is Gavin Higgins’s new opera The Monstrous Child, which receives its world premiere in February 2019. Based on Francesca Simon’s darkly humorous novel for teens, The Monstrous Child explores ordinary teenage angst in the extraordinary world of Norse gods, giants and the Underworld. The opera is the latest work commissioned by The Royal Opera for a younger audience.

The Monstrous Child is directed by Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre Artistic Director Timothy Sheader, making his Royal Opera debut, and sees Jessica Cottis return to the Company (following her debut with Mamzer Bastard at Hackney Empire in 2018) to conduct a cast featuring Marta Fontanals-Simmons, Tom Randle, Dan Shelvey, Lucy Schaufer, Elizabeth Karani and Graeme Broadbent.

In March 2019, The Royal Opera and London Handel Festival present a new staging of Handel’s Berenice, which returns for the first time to the site of its premiere at the Covent Garden Theatre in 1737. Sung in a new English translation by Selma Dimitrijevic, the opera’s story pits two strong women against princes and each other in a battle of love and politics. Adele Thomas directs the new production, with London Handel Festival Musical Director Laurence Cummings conducting the musicians of the London Handel Orchestra and a cast featuring Rachael Lloyd, James Laing, William Berger and Jette Parker Young Artists Jacquelyn Stucker and Patrick Terry.

The Royal Opera House welcomes award-winning South African lyric theatre company Isango Ensemble to the Linbury Theatre to present the first revival of A Man of Good Hope alongside a staging of SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill in April 2019. Based on Jonny Steinberg’s book, A Man of Good Hope tells the true story of one refugee’s epic quest across Africa through music and dance.

SS Mendi: Dancing the Death Drill is a powerful and moving requiem inspired by Fred Khumalo’s book on the real-life maritime disaster of 1917, when the SS Mendi sank off the Isle of Wight, killing more than 600 South Africans en route to the Western Front to support British troops.

For their annual chamber opera in May 2019, The Royal Opera and the Jette Parker Young Artists present Henze’s Phaedra, in a new production by Jette Parker Young Artist director Noa Naamat. The late German composer’s final opera had its premiere at Berlin State Opera in 2007 and is a re-working of Greek myth. The story explores the death of Hippolytus, destroyed by his stepmother Phaedra’s obsessive love for him. Phaedra reunites the Jette Parker Young Artists with the musicians of Southbank Sinfonia, who are conducted by Edmund Whitehead.

Belgian director Ivo van Hove makes his Royal Opera debut in June 2019, bringing Muziektheater Transparant’s production of The Diary of One Who Disappeared to the Royal Opera House for its UK premiere. This unique staging of Leoš Janáček’s song cycle features singers Ed Lyon and Marie Hamard and actors Hugo Koolschijn and Gijs Scholten van Aschat, and includes new music by Annelies Van Parys composed for the production.

In July 2019 The Royal Opera presents Engender, a new weekend festival that puts women working in opera at the front and centre of the action. Engender highlights a wealth of female talent both onstage and behind the scenes and provides a platform for conversations exploring gender in opera today. Events across the weekend offer insights into the creative process, first glimpses of work in progress, performances from emerging artists and the opportunity to examine and debate the future of opera with practitioners from across the art form.

For more information and tickets , visit the Royal Opera House website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Exhibition Review – Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic at the Florence Nightingale Museum from 21st September 2018 until 16th June 2019

The Florence Nightingale Museum presents a special exhibition that explores the devastating impact of the Spanish flu pandemic 100 years ago, and the role of both professional nurses in military field hospitals and ordinary women at home, in caring for victims.

Although overshadowed by the events of the First World War, the Spanish flu outbreak was a deadly influenza pandemic which struck in the autumn of 1918, just as World War I was drawing to a close. It is estimated that Spanish flu infected half a billion people worldwide and killed 50-100 million, significantly more than the war itself.

The disease did not originate in Spain but because the country was neutral in the first world war, there was not a political clampdown on news concerning the disease.

It was estimated that a quarter of the British population fell ill with Spanish flu at some point during the pandemic and about 250,000 people died. The more serious strain of the influenza was unusual because healthy young adults seemed to be particularly at risk and it created gruesome symptoms, including explosive nosebleeds and distinctive blue tinged skin caused by a lack of oxygen as their lungs filled with fluid and pus.

People became desperate and would try many alleged ‘remedies’, the exhibition includes some of these including Quinine tablets, Aspirin, Opium , Boots Eau De Cologne. Oxo and a Creosote Vaporiser.  The exhibition also includes an experimental Influenza Vaccine developed by the Royal Army Medical College which was used in a desperate attempt to combat the virus.

Such was the speed of the pandemic and with resources stretched already by the war, essential public services began to break down with hospitals being  overwhelmed with patients, and a shortage of both coffins and gravediggers meant that the bodies of victims could remain unburied for weeks. A mourning card in the exhibition relates to four children from the Baker family in Nottinghamshire who all died of influenza within the space of two weeks in 1918.

A short animated film based  on the notes of Dr Basil Hood from the St Marylebone Infirmary in this period gives some insights into the problems faced. A number of nurses died in this period in the hospital which increased the difficulties of dealing with large numbers of patients.

The exhibition explores the often neglected role of the professional nurses and ordinary women who cared for the victims in the pandemic, Florence Nightingale’s pioneering nursing work during the Crimean War revolutionised the way nurses were viewed within society. With the outbreak of World War I, thousands of women were inspired to follow in her footsteps and volunteer as nurses. It was these women that would be vital in the treatment of casualties in the war and the victims of the Spanish flu in 1918.

This fascinating small exhibition highlights some of the aspects of the Spanish flu pandemic from 100 years ago that have largely been overlooked. Even though more people died from the pandemic than were killed in the war, it was the war that grabbed all the headlines and would be honoured in ceremonies. This particular strain of flu which is similar to ‘Avian’ flu strains was poorly understood and medicines had not been developed to deal with this kind of breakout. The exhibition includes some Tamiflu capsules that were used in the 2009 Swine flu pandemic, health organisations around the world stockpiled millions of these drugs to deal with any outbreak.

The end of the war led to millions of soldiers travelling across Europe and beyond which allowed the transmission of the disease to be quicker than normally would be the case. There were cases of soldiers who had survived the horrors of the war returning home to find their wife and children had died from the pandemic. The extreme forms of the ‘flu’ led to a rise in suicides and psychological breakdowns illustrating the enormous mental strain of dealing with the pandemic.

This exhibition and the many other events that mark the centenary of the Spanish flu pandemic provide important information about how pandemic outbreaks can develop and have catastrophic consequences. It seems remarkable that the many victims of the pandemic have often been forgotten in contrast to the war dead, there are few if any memorials or plaques that remembers the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 despite the massive loss of life.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic exhibition at the Florence Nightingale Museum – 21st September 2018 until 16th June 2019

Florence Nightingale Museum, 2 Lambeth Palace Road, Lambeth, London SE1 7EW

For more information, visit the Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – ‘This vexed question’: 500 years of women in medicine at the Royal College of Physicians from 19th September 2018 to 18th January 2019


England and Wales’ oldest royal medical college, the Royal College of Physicians, marks its 500th anniversary with a major new exhibition that explores prevailing notions of female participation in the medical professions and wider society. The exhibition entitled ‘This vexed question’: 500 years of women in medicine runs from 19 September 2018 to 18 January 2019.

The exhibition provides evidence that female apothecaries, herbalists, writers of medicinal recipes, midwives  and doctors  have all worked within a male-dominated world for many centuries.

The exhibition uses a range of rare and personal objects, from medieval records to medical equipment, letters to portraits, to tell the story of some Britain’s earliest female clinicians. From 13th century Leominster is a charter asserting the existence of a set of medical siblings: one brother and his two sisters, the women doctors Solicita and Matilda. Elizabethan England was home to Alice Leevers, whose trial and punishment on several occasions for illegally practising medicine, is recorded in a section of the Royal College of Physicians’ own annals on view for the first time ever.  

The 17th century offers an array of fascinating figures and artefacts. Medical recipe books by, amongst others, Elizabeth Grey, Countess of Kent and the mysteriously named ‘Madame Pyne’, offer some insights as does an advertisement from the 1680s for the services and products of ‘Agnodjice: the woman physician’. Early evidence of the systematic exclusion of women from the medical profession comes in an act of parliament from 1511, it features women amongst the ‘great multitude of ignorant persons’ that illegally carried out ‘the Science and Cunning of Physick and Surgery’.

However, it was in the 19th century that the pressure to allow women to be allowed to enter the medical professions began to form with a number of female pioneers. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson is one of the best known of these reformers and is widely thought to be the first woman to qualify as a doctor in Britain. Her original certificate of 1865 provides evidence of passing exams but many female doctors like Anderson, Elizabeth Blackwell the Anglo-American clinician who was the first woman included on the Medical Register in 1859 and Sophia Jex Blake often received their formal qualifications as doctors from overseas. The three women eventually came together to establish the London School of Medicine for Women which opened in 1874 as the first institution of its kind in the world.

The fight for recognition in the medical profession for females often mirrored the fight for wider rights and the exhibition features a section that illustrates some of these issues. A never previously displayed letter from Dr Louisa Garrett Anderson (daughter of Elizabeth) to her employers warns that she may face arrest and imprisonment on account of her suffragette activities.  In the exhibition is a handkerchief embroidered by suffragette inmates at Holloway Prison in 1912 that includes the name of Dr Alice Kerr, a GP.

The final word goes to the voices of medical women from the last 100 years, a series of  audio testimonies, many captured by the Royal College of Physicians’ ongoing oral history project which allows the women to describe their own experiences of 20th century and contemporary medicine.

This fascinating exhibition provides plenty of evidence that women in many ways were involved in medical practices over the last 500 years. It was when medicine became known a profession that there was considerable opposition to female participation. Even then women found a way around some of these restrictions. The exhibition tells the remarkable story of Dr James Barry, who rose to be one of the British Army’s most senior medical officers. However, Barry was born Margaret Anne Bulkley and only began living as a man from late teenage years, possibly in order to secure a career in medicine.

This small free exhibition is located in the Royal College of Physicians building near Regent’s Park and is open from Monday to Friday from 19th September 2018 to 18th January 2019.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the Royal College of Physicians website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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London’s Bankside celebrates its colourful past by Flying the Flags

Bankside sits on the south side of the river Thames, stretching from London Bridge to just beyond Blackfriars Bridge. When known as ‘Banksyde’ in the 16th century, the area’s location outside the walls of the City made it a natural landing place for outsiders, dissenters and free thinkers. It became London’s lively pleasure quarter, home to theatres, brothels, gambling dens and taverns.

Although some of the more questionable activities have now thankfully disappeared, Bankside is home to London’s oldest theatres and the world’s most popular art gallery and rich in art, entertainment and culture. Tate Modern, Shakespeare’s Globe and Borough Market are the main attractions on Bankside but there many more located in area’s network of medieval streets.

To celebrate Bankside’s colourful past,  Better Bankside, in collaboration with NB Studio, has challenged over 40 leading artists and designers in Bankside and London to design flags that celebrate the area’s independent spirit. The display of 60 flags is part of London Design Festival (LDF), which celebrates London as the design capital of the world. The flags will fly at Borough Market’s Jubilee Place from 15-23 September 2018, before moving to locations across Bankside.

The new display features work by vibrant artist/designer Morag Myerscough, leading typographer and printmaker Alan Kitching and illustrator Alice Bowsher, as well as Bankside-based Borough Market and a host of local design studios. Following the festival, the flags will be auctioned to raise money for Better Bankside’s three local community partners.

For more information, visit the Better Bankside website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cezanne at the National Gallery from 17th September 2018 to 20th January 2019


For the first time in London for 70 years, the National Gallery displays major Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterworks from the Courtauld Gallery, purchased in the 1920s by Samuel Courtauld. These paintings alongside paintings from the National Gallery’s own collection are shown in a new exhibition entitled Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne.

The exhibition tells the story of how two exhibitions of French Impressionist paintings in London in the late 1910s and 1920s had a profound impact on Courtauld who began to build up a two collections, one for himself and his wife and one for the nation. The collections of mainly French modern art were made at a time when the appetite for this kind of art in the UK was low, but Courtauld was a great supporter of Cézanne’s work in particular.

This exhibition of over forty works is centred around the loan of 26 masterpieces from the Courtauld Gallery, which is closing temporarily in September 2018 as part of a major transformation project. The exhibition traces the development of modern French painting from the 1860s to the turn of the 20th century and is arranged chronologically in 12 sections – each devoted to a different artist – includes the works of such key figures as Daumier, Manet, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, and Bonnard.

Highlights from Courtauld’s private collection, now part of the Courtauld Gallery, include Renoir’s La Loge (Theatre Box) (1874), Cézanne’s The Card Players (about 1892–6) and Lac d’Annecy (1896), Toulouse-Lautrec’s Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge (about 1892), Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882), and Seurat’s Young Woman Powdering Herself (about 1888–90).

These pictures hang alongside major works acquired for the national collection through the Courtauld Fund. This was set up in 1923 by Courtauld himself for the acquisition of modern French paintings and the works that were purchased now form the core of the National Gallery’s post-1800 collection. They include Renoir’s At the Theatre (La Première Sortie) (1876–7); as well as Seurat’s Bathers at Asnières (1884), Cézanne’s Self Portrait (about 1880–1) and Van Gogh’s A Wheatfield with Cypresses (1889) which were the first paintings by these three artists to enter a British public collection.

Walking around the relatively small and intimate exhibition, the visitor attention is drawn to many of the iconic Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings on view, Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (1882) has been favourite in the Courtauld Gallery for decades and the same can be said for Seurat’s Bathers at Asnières (1884) at the National Gallery. Perhaps the most interesting part about the exhibition is to consider the different styles of the artists, although considered Impressionist and Post-Impressionist, each artist developed their own particular style which became instantly recognisable.

There are a couple of artists that perhaps not so recognisable like  Daumier and Bonnard but the main part of the exhibition is given over to the ‘greats of the period which include Manet, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh, Monet, Degas, Pissarro and Gauguin.

This remarkable exhibition is a testament to the taste and generosity of Samuel Courtauld  who went against critical and public opinion when he began to start his collection. He saw something in the then new French modern art that was new and exciting and he was determined that it would find its place in his private collection and public collection. Even he would probably have been surprised by the way that Impressionist and Post-Impressionist has gained favour amongst the art establishment and the general public over the last century. Whilst many of these picture have been on public view in London, the unique nature of this exhibition is likely to make it extremely popular with critics and the public.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings at the Royal Academy of Arts from 15th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts present an exhibition of the internationally-renowned architect and Honorary Royal Academician Renzo Piano. The exhibition entitled Renzo Piano: The Art of Buildings is the first comprehensive survey of Piano’s career to be held in London since 1989, and is located in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens.

Renzo Piano  is one of the world’s leading architects and is primarily known for his work on the Centre Pompidou in Paris, The Shard in London and the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.  In 1981 the architect founded the Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), located in Paris, Genoa and New York, which, with a team of 150 staff, has realised over 100 projects that include large cultural and institutional buildings, housing and offices, as well as urban plans for entire city districts.

Born into a family of Italian builders, Piano has incorporated the practical aspects of this background with experimentation with form, material and engineering to create a coherent whole. Piano is known for his attention to detail in the design process, constantly testing the way that the buildings will look and feel.

The exhibition offers  an overview of the architect’s practice through sixteen of his most significant projects, dating from his early career when he was experimenting with innovative structural systems, to some of his best known buildings of the present day. Highlights include Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971), Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa (1998), The New York Times Building (2007), The Shard, London (2012), Jérôme Seydoux Pathé Foundation, Paris (2014) and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).

The projects are laid out on tables in a couple of the galleries and are a mixture of archival material, models, photographs and drawings. Each project display gives some insights into the design process but perhaps more importantly into the conceptual theme of each particular building.

To understand more about how Piano sees the world and the role of architecture within it, there is a specially commissioned film by Thomas Riedelsheimer in the central gallery.

Also in the central gallery is large centrepiece that is a sculptural installation designed by RPBW especially for the exhibition, illustrating 100 of Piano’s projects on an imaginary island.

Around the walls of the gallery are 32 photographs by Gianni Berengo Gardin, large drawings of various projects and hanging from the ceiling are various models of different pieces of materials used in the design process.

Architecture is often quite a difficult form to show in art galleries, very often models do not do justice to the large-scale of the actual buildings. However this fascinating exhibition is more concerned in providing some insights into the work, aspirations and achievements of an architect who believes in the many possibilities of architecture.  The new Royal Academy is committed to raising the profile and appreciation of architects and architecture, this high-profile exhibition provides a wonderful launching board for many other exhibitions on the subject.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended   

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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