Bow Street Police Museum due to open 2021

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

In early 2021, one of London’s first police stations will become the country’s newest independent museum. Bow Street Police Museum will sit inside no. 28 Bow Street, home of Bow Street Police Station and Magistrates’ Court for over a century. The ground floor cells and offices will become galleries, telling the story of the Bow Street Runners, the country’s first organised force, and the Metropolitan Police officers who walked the streets of Covent Garden in their footsteps.

Bow Street Police Museum is due to open in early 2021. It will sit within the new NoMad London Hotel, which will occupy the entire newly-restored building. The Museum will operate as an independent charity supported initially by the owners of the building, the Sydell Group, but eventually becoming self-sufficient.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

The Museum will be filled with stories of investigations, arrests and justice being served, from 18th century crime fighting to the moment the police station closed its doors in 1992, followed by the court in 2006. Along the way, it will explore Bow Street’s unique role in police, law and social history and the workings of the first Metropolitan Police station. And as well as telling the stories of the historic, sometimes infamous, trials heard at Bow Street Magistrates’ Court, the Museum will also instigate discussions about many aspects of police history, modern policing and social justice.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

Among the collections to be displayed will be the original dock from Court no. 2; early equipment used by the Bow Street Runners on patrol, including an original cutlass, a specially-made replica Runners uniform (featuring blue double-breasted coat, blue trousers, black felt hat, black boots and the red waistcoat that earned early officers the nickname ‘robin red breasts’); a beautiful reproduction of a collection of sketches by court artist William Hartley; and personal effects from former officers, including beat books, truncheons and items from their time on duty at Bow Street. Visitors will also be invited to spend time in ‘the tank’, the large cell that was often the destination
for men arrested for drunken behaviour in public.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

In 1881, a new police station and courthouse opened in Covent Garden. For the next century and beyond, the building was a hive of activity and Metropolitan Police officers patrolled the streets, dealing with everything that came their way. People came in and out of the main station door all day and night, and officers took calls from the public, sent colleagues to incidents, interviewed suspects,
completed paperwork and oversaw prisoners.

People arrested by police officers at Bow Street were held overnight and tried at the Magistrates’ Court next door. The Court held a unique status that enabled it to deal with extradition proceedings, terrorist offences and cases related to the Official Secrets Act. This brought a string of notable cases to Bow Street, including IRA terrorist cases and the extradition cases against the former dictator of
Chile, General Augusto Pinochet. The Museum will share the tales of many of those who found themselves up before Bow Street’s judges, including the Kray Twins, Dr Crippen, Oscar Wilde and suffragettes Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and Mrs Drummond.

The Museum will also trace the life and times of Covent Garden, exploring how the market, theatreland, shops, bars, restaurants intertwined with Bow Street. Given their location, officers devoted much of their time to working closely with the hundreds of traders that filled Covent Garden’s fruit, vegetable and flower market, and sharing the time of day – and a cup of tea if they were in luck – with locals.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Venue: Bow Street Police Museum, 28 Bow Street, London WC2E 7AW
Admission: Entrance: £6.00; Concessions: £4.50 / £3.00; Children under 12 and carers: free
Opening: For the first six months we will operate three days a week Fri- Sun, 11.00 – 16.30

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace at The Queen’s Gallery from 4 December 2020 to January 2022

The Queen’s Gallery in London presents a new exhibition that includes a series of stunning paintings recognised as among the highlights of the Royal Collection, the exhibition includes works by Titian, Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Van Dyck and Canaletto. The exhibition entitled Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace brings together 65 of the most treasured paintings that usually hang in the Picture Gallery, one of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace.

The exhibition gives visitors a unique opportunity to view these world-renowned paintings in a modern gallery setting, away from the interiors of Buckingham Palace, allowing visitors the chance to enjoy each painting close up.

The exhibition is organised by school, with groupings of Italian, Dutch and Flemish paintings. In the Dutch room there are a series of works created in the Low Countries between 1630 and 1680, during the Dutch Golden Age, includes Johannes Vermeer’s ‘The Music Lesson’, early 1660s; Gerrit Dou’s The Grocer’s Shop, 1672; A Woman at her Toilet, 1663, by Jan Steen; and Pieter de Hooch’s Cardplayers in a Sunlit Room, 1658. These depictions of everyday life are considered some of the finest works of the period with their remarkable detail and use of light and space

Artists from the Low Countries also produced works from the more traditional branches of art, such as narrative paintings, portraits and landscapes. The exhibition includes In Milkmaids with Cattle in a Landscape, c.1617–18, Sir Peter Paul Rubens, while working in Rubens’ studio in 1618–19, the young Sir Anthony van Dyck produced Christ Healing the Paralytic.

Some of the highlights of the exhibition are portraits by Dutch artists including Rembrandt van Rijn and Frans Hals. Frans Hals’ Portrait of a Man, 1630, conveys a dynamic sense of movement, Rembrandt uses all his skills on his ‘The Shipbuilder and his Wife’, 1633 and Portrait of Agatha Bas, 1641.

The exhibition includes paintings created in Italy over a period of 200 years, landscapes range from Gaspard Dughet’s Seascape with Jonah and the Whale, c.1654, to Claude Lorrain’s Harbour Scene at Sunset, 1643. A series of work by Canaletto transports the viewer to the beauty of Venice.

Other Italian works include the more classical approaches of Guido Reni’s Cleopatra with the Asp, 1628, Parmigianino’s Pallas Athene, 1535, Titian’s Madonna and Child in a Landscape with Tobias and the Angel, c.1537, and Cristofano Allori’s Judith with the Head of Holofernes, 1613.

This fascinating exhibition been made possible by the removal of the paintings from the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace during the overhaul of the Palace’s essential services. It is perhaps a once in a lifetime chance of really getting close to some of the most remarkable paintings in the Royal Collection. The collection is quite eclectic which provides plenty of interest and the Dutch and Flemish paintings in particular offer a great insight into a period of great economic growth in the Low Countries.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Tracey Emin / Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul at the Royal Academy from 7 December 2020 to 28 February 2021

The Royal Academy of Arts will present a landmark exhibition bringing together for the first time the work of acclaimed British artist Tracey Emin RA (b.1963) and the Norwegian Expressionist Edvard Munch (1863-1944), two internationally renowned artists born 100 years apart. Long fascinated and inspired by Edvard Munch’s work, Tracey Emin will choose a selection of his masterpieces to accompany her own works.

The exhibition will feature around 25 works by Emin, including paintings, some of which will be on display for the first time, as well neons and sculpture. These have been chosen by Emin to sit alongside a carefully considered selection of 19 oil paintings and watercolours by Munch, drawn from the collection and archives of the Munch Museet in Oslo, Norway. The exhibition will interweave the works of both artists across all three galleries, demonstrating that Emin and Munch, though separated by time and history, they explore the same emotional landscape.

In her formative years as an artist, Emin was drawn to the expressionism of paintings by both Edvard Munch and Egon Schiele, their concerns in exploring the complex human condition and tortured psyche. In particular, Munch’s confrontation and exploration of emotions in his work had an enduring appeal to Emin, who saw him as ‘a friend in art’, and as early as 1982 was directly referencing the artist in her work.

The Loneliness of the Soul will focus on themes of grief, loss and longing. Emin has focused on a group of Munch’s works which explore his complex relationship with the female sex. Early tragic events including the death of his mother when he was only five years old, followed a few years later by his beloved sister, and then a series of doomed love affairs, all contributed to this uneasy connection. The works on display highlight his fascination with the depiction of women, their emotional states and the process of ageing.

This selection will include well-known works such as The Death of Marat, 1907. Referencing the subject of Jacques-Louis David’s famous painting of 1793 which bears the same title, Munch may have been considering his legacy in addition to exploring traditional complex attitudes towards women. The revolutionary Marat was murdered by Charlotte Corday, who feared he would incite a civil war in France. History presents Marat as a hero and Corday as a traitor. The subject and history’s reading of it had resonance for Munch who had just undergone a painful breakup with a woman he had been engaged to for a number of years, a trauma that was to haunt him throughout his life, and of which many expressions can be detected in his work.

This sense of personal disclosure and an intimate exploration of the body as a battleground is equally recognisable in works by Emin, for example in the deeply expressionistic It – didnt stop – I didnt stop, 2019. Like Munch, Emin is also unafraid to examine the impact of events in her own life through her work. Paintings such as You were here like the ground underneath my feet and Because you left, both 2016, , explore the complex emotions regarding loss and longing. Indeed, Emin’s paintings have long been a compellingly powerful expression of her inner life and psychological state.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Christmas at Charles Dickens Museum 2020

One of the highlights of Christmas in London is a visit the Charles Dickens Museum at no. 48 Doughty Street, Dickens’s only surviving London house. The Museum carries on the traditional Dickensian Christmas with holly and ivy decking the halls, beautiful Victorian decorations throughout the house and a whole host of other festive surprises.

One hundred and seventy-seven years ago, in November 1843, Charles Dickens was writing A Christmas Carol, a book that changed Christmas. Since 1843, the book has never been out of print and remains firmly fixed as an important ingredient of Christmas.

With pandemic restrictions in place, the Christmas celebrations at the Charles Dickens Museum this year will be very different with limited access to no. 48 Doughty Street and a special set of online events celebrating Dickens and Christmas.

48 Doughty Street is the London residence where Dickens wrote Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby, completed The Pickwick Papers and began Barnaby Rudge. As well as the historic rooms and the collections that feature throughout, the current exhibition Technicolour Dickens: The Living Image of Charles Dickens brings visitors closer than ever before to the real Charles Dickens. It reveals Dickens as he actually was, explores the enduring power of his image and culminates in a new, vivid suite of colour photographic portraits.

From Thursday 3 December, it is hoped that visitors to the Museum will follow in Dickens’s footsteps as they savour the sights, sounds and scents of the rooms where he lived and worked.

As the house is dressed for Christmas, the Museum will also display a number of previously unseen items from its collection, which both underline Dickens’s love of the season and also act as a progress report on the writing of A Christmas Carol.

SPECIAL EVENTS FOR CHRISTMAS 2020

Lucinda Hawksley on Dickens and Christmas

Join Lucinda Dickens Hawksley and discover what Christmas was really like in the 19th century. Find out how Charles Dickens and his own family celebrated Christmas, and how Dickens’s stories helped to influence the way we celebrate today. Using the research for her book, Dickens and Christmas, Lucinda will talk about the ways in which the festive season changed during her great-great-great-grandfather’s lifetime – from 1812-1870 – and how his Christmas writing captured the public imagination, and began a renewed fervour for all things Christmas.

Date: Sunday 13th December; 5.30pm; £8; Via Zoom.

Christmas Housemaid Tour

Step back in time to Christmas 1838; Dickens and his young family are out enjoying the festivities and during their absence, the housemaid is up to no good…While they are attending a Christmas Ball at the home of Ms Burdett-Coutts, their housemaid takes a break from her many duties and invites you to step through the original door of 48 Doughty Street and discover the secrets of the esteemed young writer and his growing family. Follow in the footsteps of the celebrated young author as you enjoy an exclusive tour of Dickens’s ‘house in town’ filled with festive greenery and authentic Victorian fayre.

Date: Tuesday 15th December 7pm and Sunday 19th December 11am & 4pm; £12; Via Zoom followed by live Q&A.

Dominic Gerrard’s A Christmas Carol

Experience this celebrated production of A Christmas Carol online from inside Dickens’ London home. Filmed this year by candlelight, this beautiful, haunting, adaptation will follow Scrooge through the very rooms where Dickens lived and wrote. Featuring puppetry and a Christmas soundscape, this magical, site-specific performance will transport you through a shifting scenery of decorated spaces, as Scrooge travels with the ghosts that have been sent to reclaim him. According to Dickens’s great-great-great-granddaughter, Lucinda Dickens Hawksley, ‘It’s the perfect way to begin your Christmas’.

Dates: Thursday 17th December 7pm, Sunday 20th December 2pm and Thursday 31st December 7pm; £15; Via Zoom Includes Pre-recorded performance and live Q&A

A Dickens Family Christmas

A family Zoom call with a difference. Join the extended Dickens family as they share memories from generations past and discuss all the vital ingredients of a Dickens family Christmas. We’ll learn which Victorian traditions have stood the test of time and the modern traditions that have been adopted by the family. The event includes a bonus as the family shows how to blend the perfect Smoking Bishop.

Date: Tuesday 22nd December; 7.30pm; £15; Via Zoom Live

Unabridged A Christmas Carol by Dominic Gerrard

Join us on Zoom for a special live reading of Dickens’ novella A Christmas Carol. No cuts and no revisions! Every beat of Scrooge’s Christmas will be told as Dickens first conceived it, in the winter of 1843. Read in real time, by acclaimed actor Dominic Gerrard, this story will haunt your house pleasantly as you sit by the fire; wrap presents; or make your last-minute Christmas preparations! Book early for this rare chance to experience the full magic and power of Dickens’ words and their bright, cheerful influence on all of us.

Date: Wednesday 23rd December; 3-7pm; Pay What You Can – Tickets from £10; Via Zoom live

MUSEUM INFORMATION

The Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX
Opening hours: 10am to 5pm, Friday, Saturday and Sunday

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Royal Opera House 2020 festive highlights for live audiences

The Royal Opera House has announced a packed schedule of Christmas treats that includes festive highlights from both The Royal Ballet and The Royal Opera.

The Royal Ballet’s much-loved production of The Nutcracker returns to the ROH stage, in a COVID-safe restaging of Peter Wright’s celebrated two-act production. Opening on Friday 11 December and running until Sunday 3 January there will be 17 magical performances, with tickets available to purchase from Tuesday 1 December. Enjoy the much-loved elements of this cherished classic, from the magical growing Christmas tree, to the enchanting Dance of the Snowflakes and spectacular duet with the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Prince in the Kingdom of Sweets.

New for The Royal Ballet’s 2020 production is a battle scene between the Nutcracker, the Mouse King and their armies, choreographed by Will Tuckett. Combined with Tchaikovsky’s score, performed live by the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, and charming designs by Julia Trevelyan Oman, this classic ballet is not to be missed.

Leading up to this festive treat, The Royal Ballet invites audiences to watch the dancers in a special filmed Insight of The Nutcracker in Rehearsal via the Royal Opera House YouTube channel on Tuesday 1 December at 7pm GMT. This streamed event is part of the Royal Opera House digital Insights programme.

In addition, The Royal Opera presents four performances of a sparkling Christmas Concert on 18, 19 and 20 December. The festive staging will include extracts from fairy-tale opera favourites including Rossini’s La Cenerentola (Cinderella) and Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel, as well as rousing tunes from Royal Opera repertory classics including Puccini’s La bohème, Mozart’s The Magic Flute and Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on Christmas Carols to bring out the full seasonal spirit.

Soloists Jennifer Davis, Hanna Hipp, Jeremy White and Roderick Williams perform, as well as Stephanie Wake-Edwards and Dominic Sedgwick, with the combined forces of the Royal Opera Chorus, Jette Parker Young Artists and Orchestra of the Royal Opera House in this wonderful Yuletide celebration.

Christmas at a glance:

The Royal Opera: Christmas Concert

18, 19, 20 December 7pm GMT

20 December 3pm

Livestream Friday 18 December 7pm GMT, £10

Tickets: £4 to £75

The Royal Ballet, The Nutcracker

11, 12, 13, 19, 21, 22, 23, 29, 30, 31 December, 1, 2, 3 January 2pm GMT

15, 16, 17 December 7pm GMT

24 December 12pm GMT

Casting to be announced in due course.

Tickets: £5 – £100

Royal Opera House Insight – The Nutcracker in Rehearsal

Streamed event.

Tuesday 1 December 7pm GMT

Free to watch online via http://www.youtube.com/royaloperahouse

For more information, visit the Royal Opera House website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Christmas Crafts Workshops at Severndroog Castle – 28 and 29 November 2020

Severndroog Castle continues its series of online events and activities with Christmas Crafts Workshops to get you in the festive mood.

Local Greenwich makers and Severndroog regulars: Janey Jones and Happy by Harper will be running interactive Zoom workshops for online Christmas Craft Workshops.

Both workshops are suitable for anyone 18+, no experience necessary. Workshop tickets include kits mailed out to you via Royal Mail, so you will ready to get hands-on with making.

Candle-making online workshop – Saturday 28 November 2020 Sarah Harper founder of ethical homeware brand, Happy by Harper, will guide you through making your own lovely Christmas scented candle.

Very limited places, so book early here 

Pop-up Christmas cards online workshop – Sunday 29 November 2020 Learn all the tricks of the trade to make your own lovely pop-up Christmas cards with Janey Jones, local artist and professional prop-maker for venues such as the Royal Opera House. Limited places, so book early here

For more details and other offers, go to the Severndroog website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

The Royal Opera House broadcasts series of ballet and opera live performances over the November lockdown

The Royal Opera House will present a series of live performance broadcasts, with some much-loved repertory favourites from both The Royal Ballet and The Royal Opera, throughout the November lockdown period.

The Royal Opera will present a livestreamed concert performance of Ariodante on Friday 20 November. This rarely performed work, which will be available via the Royal Opera House streaming platform, opened Handel’s first season at Covent Garden in 1735 and has not been performed at the Royal Opera House since. This new, live staging offers audiences an opportunity to enjoy a performance that celebrates the full span of the ROH history.

Mezzo-soprano Paula Murrihy will perform in the title role with soprano Chen Reiss as Ginevra, bass-baritone Gerald Finley as the King of Scotland, soprano Sophie Bevan as Dalinda, tenor Ed Lyon as Lurcanio, countertenor Iestyn Davies as Polinesso, and South African tenor and former Jette Parker Young Artist Thando Mjandana as Odoardo. They will be joined by Baroque music specialist Christian Curnyn, who conducts the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House.

Following the success of The Royal Ballet: Back on Stage and welcoming an audience back into the building with The Royal Ballet: Live, the ROH presents a special live-streamed performance on 13 November. The programme completes the celebration of the Company’s return to the stage following its long absence during the pandemic. Jonathan Lo conducts the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House in cherished works and modern classics from the Company’s repertory.

The programme includes the world premiere of Scherzo, a new work featuring the young members of the Company choreographed by First Soloist Valentino Zucchetti, his first work for the main stage and seen in rehearsal during World Ballet Day. Celebrated pas de deux from the repertory from the serene to the electric will also feature, including Swan Lake with Francesca Hayward and Cesar Corrales, Frederick Ashton’s Rhapsody with Akane Takada and Alexander Campbell, Kenneth MacMillan’s Manon with Laura Morera and Federico Bonelli and Concerto with Yasmine Naghdi and Nicol Edmonds, Cathy Marston’s In Our Wishes with Romany Pajdak and Calvin Richardson plus George Balanchine’s Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux, with Royal Opera House debuts by Marcelino Sambé and Anna Rose O’Sullivan, and Le Corsaire with Marianela Nuñez and Vadim Muntagirov. The programme also includes Natalia Osipova in the haunting Dying Swan solo by Mikhail Fokine plus the serenity of Ashton’s Dance of the Blessed Spirits with William Bracewell and Monotones II with Melissa Hamilton, Reece Clarke and Nicol Edmonds. The evening closes with a full performance of Christopher Wheeldon’s ballet of shimmering beauty Within the Golden Hour featuring Sarah Lamb, Ryoichi Hirano, Fumi Kaneko, Reece Clarke, Anna Rose O’Sullivan and James Hay with artists of The Royal Ballet.

ROH Friday Premieres continue throughout the month. Priced at £3.00, each will be available for 30 days streaming via stream.roh.org.uk. The next ROH Friday premiere will be Frederick Ashton’s Enigma Variations, to be streamed on Friday 4 December . Ashton’s quintessentially British ballet was created in 1968 and last performed at Covent Garden in 2019. With period designs by Julia Trevelyan Oman and Edward Elgar’s eponymous score, it stands as an enduring and evocative portrait of the composer and his companions. This streaming from the 2019 revival features performances from Royal Ballet Principals Laura Morera, Francesca Hayward and Matthew Ball alongside Principal Character Artist Christopher Saunders as Edward Elgar.

On 27 November, the Royal Opera’s 2019 production of Mozart’s dazzling tragicomedy Don Giovanni will be shown. Conducted by Hartmut Haenchen, the magnificent cast includes Erwin Schrott, Roberto Tagliavini, Malin Byström, Daniel Behle, Myrtò Papatanasiu, Louise Alder and Leon Košavić.

For more information, visit the Royal Opera House website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Florence Nightingale Museum: Events Talks and Tours

There has never been a better time to understand pandemics in historical perspective and the Florence Nightingale Museum offers a series of new events, talks and tours for groups, including the chance to have the Museum to yourselves.

The Museum tells the life story of a visionary health reformer and the Museum galleries reflect on the issues of hygiene and ways of preventing the spread of disease that are now central to our lives.

Having reopened in August, the Museum is now open four days a week – Thursday to Sunday – with rigorously efficient new ways of operating, drawing on the medical expertise from the neighbouring St Thomas’ Hospital. Now, the Museum is inviting groups to have the run of its galleries, as well as offering new online visits for those unable to make the trip to London.

One of the highlights of a visit to the Museum is the warm greeting on arrival from Florence Nightingale (one of the Museum’s actors) and the lesson in effective handwashing, scrupulous hygiene and social distancing that she delivers. Groups are now able to arrange an online Meet Miss Nightingale interactive event, in which Florence discusses the events and achievements of her life.

The Florence Nightingale Museum tells the story of the mother of modern nursing and the people following in her footsteps today. Opened in 1989 and sitting in the grounds of St Thomas’ Hospital, the Museum looks beyond the mythical ‘Lady with the Lamp’ tale to present a fully-rounded picture of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), a tireless campaigner and inspirational world leader in her field.

Meet Miss Nightingale – Online

Unable to visit the Museum at the moment? You can still learn all about Florence Nightingale and her life from your own home, school, or university, while also helping to support the Museum through these difficult times. Hear the story of Florence Nightingale’s life from Florence herself! Learn about her favourite and most unusual pet,museum why she ended up working at Scutari Hospital during the Crimean War and her lifetime achievements which still influence us today. Adapted from the popular Meet Miss Nightingale performances normally held at the Museum, the interactive performance-based talk will give your group an insight into the life and work of the founder of modern nursing in her bicentenary year.

The Museum welcome groups from schools, universities, U3A as well as any other groups wishing to book. Platform: Zoom. Activity length: 30-40 minutes. Number of participants: Up to 100. Price: £120

Exclusive group bookings

Due to the pandemic, the Museum is closed on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. However, these days are now available for exclusive 90-minute group visits between 10am and 4pm, in which your group will have the Museum to themselves. Regular admission prices apply. Bookings are for group of between seven and fifteen people, plus one guide.

Group visits
Group visits during opening hours are currently limited to a maximum number of fifteen people.

Museum Information

Florence Nightingale Museum, 2 Lambeth Palace Road, London SE1 7EW

Admission prices: Adult £9.00; Child (under 16) £5.00; Student £6.00; Concessions £7.00; Family £20.00 (2 adults and up to 4 children under 16) & additional children £3.00; Children under 5 Free; Carers Free.

Opening hours: Thursday to Sunday. Closed Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday. Entry slots from 10.15am until 4.30pm.

Travel: The Museum is a short walk from Waterloo station and Westminster tube, located in the grounds of St Thomas’ Hospital (on the corner of Westminster Bridge and Lambeth Palace Road).

For more information and tickets , visit the Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review: Turner’s Modern World at Tate Britain from 28 October 2020 – 7 March 2021

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents a landmark exhibition dedicated to JMW Turner (1775-1851), Turner’s Modern World explores how one of Britain’s greatest landscape painter found new ways to capture the tumultuous events of his day, from technology’s impact to the effects of modernisation on society. The exhibition brings together 160 key works, including major loans as well as paintings and rarely seen drawings from Tate’s Turner Bequest.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Turner lived through dramatic times when Britain was at war and revolutions and independence struggles took place around the world. He also witnessed the way that capitalism and the industrial revolution was transforming the world around him. Whilst many artists saw the changes with disgust and saw the destruction of the pastoral Britain they loved, Turner was fascinated how the industry and infrastructure were changing Britain’s landscape.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars inspired Turner’s work with paintings such as The Battle of Trafalgar 1806-8 and Field of Waterloo 1818, but he also depicted aspects of life and work in Britain before, during and after conflict.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition presents his recollections of wartime at home and his reflections on the reputations of Nelson, Napoleon and Wellington as well as on ordinary soldiers and civilians.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the Causes and Campaigns room, the exhibition reflects on Turner’s interest in social reform, including liberal and humanitarian causes such as Greek independence from Ottoman Turkey, the 1832 Reform Act and the abolition movement. Key works include The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons 1835, while A Disaster at Sea 1835 and Wreck of a Transport Ship c.1801  illustrates Turner’s interest in  maritime history.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final section of the exhibition brings a focus on Turner’s interest in steam technology and industrialisation, in many ways Turner’s late style was influenced by the modern world. In contrast with many of his contemporaries, Turner’s late work began to be less classical and more impressionistic with the emphasis of dynamic movement and vibrant colour. 

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Some of his major works are included in this section such as .Snow Storm 1842 as well as The Fighting ‘Téméraire’ 1839 and Rain, Steam and Speed 1844 on rare loan from the National Gallery.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition is a reminder of how innovative and in some ways how radical Turner was. Turner was generally well respected by other artists and the public but was often seen as a bit of an outsider. Therefore whilst other artists saw the industrial revolution as to be something to ignore, Turner was fascinated by the changes and tried to capture some visual record of the rapidly changing world.  This exhibition provides plenty of evidence of the wide range of the artist’s abilities and illustrates how Turner has become less of an outsider but rather recognised as a pioneer in developing new styles that would be taken up be the impressionists and others.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Autumn Events at the Charles Dickens Museum

This half-term the Charles Dickens Museum is inviting families into Dickens’s London townhouse for a new programme of bespoke family tours designed to unlock the history, atmosphere and stories contained within each room of Dickens’s home. Throughout October half-term, expert Museum guides will create tours of 48 Doughty Street (Dickens’s only surviving London house) especially for the people in each group. Children will also welcomed in for self-portrait art workshops, inspired by the Museum’s new exhibition, Technicolour Dickens.

In addition, virtual events include a tour of the Museum with a viewing of objects not normally on display and a special event on Dickens’s third daughter, Katey, led by writer, historian and Dickens’s great-great-great-granddaughter, Lucinda Hawksley.

Dining Room, Credit, Newangle Copyright, Charles Dickens Museum

Interactive Family Tours

For children aged between 5-11 and their families, the Museum is offering a new Interactive Family Tour. Each tour, for a maximum of six people, is designed specifically for your family group, and lets you explore Charles Dickens’s home with your own dedicated guide. Please note that children must be accompanied by at least one adult, and all members of the group must come from the same household or support bubble. Tickets must be booked in advance.

Dates: Tours are available on 26 Oct, 30 Oct and 1 Nov. Price: £60 per family ticket.

My Technicoloured Self

Are you aged 13-16? Are you interested in how the highs and lows of our mental health can affect our creativity? Would you enjoy having a go at creating a self-portrait to hang in the house of one of the most famous authors of all time? All art abilities are welcome, from absolute beginner to pro!

Dates: 27th– 29th Oct. Places available through application only.

Guided Virtual Tour of the Charles Dickens Museum

Join curator Louisa Price on a virtual, guided tour of 48 Doughty Street, the home of the great Victorian novelist, journalist, speechwriter and public reader, Charles Dickens. Join us as we explore the five floors of this Bloomsbury townhouse. We will visit the ground and first floor public rooms that reveal Charles and Catherine Dickens’s busy social life, and peek into the book-lined study where Dickens worked on the classics, Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby. In the basement’s bustling kitchen and wash house we will hear stories of the household’s servants and further up in the bedrooms we will learn about Dickens’s personal life and a tragedy that befell the family during their time here. Finally in the attic, secrets will be disclosed that were only revealed after the writer’s death in 1870. The Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection relating to Dickens and as part of this tour, Louisa will also show several treasures not usually on display. This is a live event and you can ask questions throughout the tour via a chat window as well as in a Q&A session at the end. Zoom is required to take part in this tour and discussion. A link to the Zoom session will be emailed to registrants the day before the session.

Date: Thursday 22nd October at 6pm and Tuesday 27th October at 3.30pm.

Tickets: £8 per person/ device. Duration: Approx. 60 minutes

Drawing Room – Credit, Siobhan Doran Photography Copyright, Charles Dickens Museum

Dickens’s Artistic Daughter – Katey

Join author, historian and Dickens descendant Lucinda Hawksley for a special virtual talk on Katey Dickens as we mark her birthday. On 29 October 1839, Catherine Dickens gave birth to her third child, a daughter they named Katey, who was born at 48 Doughty Street (now the Charles Dickens Museum). Katey Dickens grew up to become a famous artist – that is, famous in her own day, but almost entirely forgotten in the 21st century. Join us on what would have been her birthday to discover the intriguing story of Charles and Catherine Dickens’s artistic daughter.

This is a live event and you can ask questions throughout the tour via a chat window as well as in a Q&A session at the end. Zoom is required to take part in this tour and discussion. A link to the Zoom session will be emailed to registrants the day before the session.

Date: Thursday 29th October at 6pm. Tickets: £8 per person/ device

Duration: Approx. 60 minutes

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

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