Exhibition Review: Picasso and Paper at the Royal Academy from 25 January to 13 April 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents an exhibition entitled Picasso and Paper which is the most comprehensive exhibition devoted to Picasso’s imaginative and original uses of paper ever to be held. The exhibition brings together over 300 works and covers Picasso’s remarkable 80-year career, the exhibition illustrates the ways in which the artist worked both on and with paper, and provides new insights into this little known aspect of the artist’s work.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) is considered one of the most important artists of the 20th century and he worked in a large range of mediums including painting, sculpture, ceramics and graphic arts.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition is organised chronologically and explores all stages of Picasso’s career working with paper and features works like Women at Their Toilette, winter 1937-38, which is exhibited in the UK for the first time in over 50 years; Cubist papiers-collés such as Violin, 1912; studies for his famous work Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features many of Picasso’s drawings, including Self-portrait, 1918 and Seated Woman (Dora), 1938.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a number of drawings, displayed alongside closely related paintings and sculptures. La Vie, 1903 , is displayed with preparatory drawings. Picasso’s Cubist bronze Head of a Woman (Fernande), 1909 is exhibited together with associated drawings. The large sculpture, Man with a Sheep, 1943 is displayed together with a group of large ink and wash drawings.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All through the exhibition is evidence of the enormous range of Picasso’s experimental work over the course of his career. Woodcuts printed by hand, photograms made with Dora Maar and later with André Villers, designs for the ballet, experimental graphic designs and illustrated books.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Within the exhibition is a room showing the film Le Mystère Picasso of 1955, a documentary showing the artist drawing with with felt-tip pens, some of those original drawings are on show.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The closing section focuses on Picasso’s last decade which focuses on his work as a printmaker. Drawings, prints and copper plates are displayed near Picasso’s printing press from the period.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This remarkable and fascinating exhibition offers people the opportunity to understand the creative genius of Pablo Picasso in all its guises. Whilst many people will be familiar with certain aspects of the artist’s career, very rarely do you see the full range of his talent. His relentless and dynamic creativity and experimentation illustrated in the exhibition provides compelling insights into the artist’s working methods and techniques. Whether it is a large painting, sculpture or small paper figures, Picasso creates a very original style that often hypnotises even the casual viewer. Although the title of the exhibition may not set the pulse racing, this is probably one of the most important Picasso exhibitions in recent years.

The exhibition sponsored by the City of Malaga runs from the 25 January to 13 April 2020

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review: Winter Lights 2020 in Canary Wharf – 16 to 25 January 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Canary Wharf is best known for being one of London’s main financial district but has one of the largest collections of public art in Europe. Throughout the year it has a series of festivals and events, one of Canary Wharf’s most popular festivals is the Winter Lights Festival.

The Winter Lights festival returns for a sixth year attracting some of the most imaginative light artists from around the world to create spectacular artworks, installations and interactive experiences.

The festival attracts large crowds and provides plenty of entertainment for all the family.

1: Mi-E Dor De Tine by Daisler Association, Middle Dock
This romantic message declares “I miss you”. Whilst there is no perfect translation, this is the closest adaptation for this Romanian saying. It refers to a deeper meaning about longing or missing someone.

Romania

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

2: Bit.fall by Julius Popp, Chancellor Passage
An ever-changing cascade of words created by thousands of falling illuminated water droplets. The words are derived from a number of live news sources including The Times, The Guardian and the BBC News.

Germany

3: The Clew by OTTOTTO, Cubitt Steps
Made from 100 circles of red light, The Clew is a beautiful structure created around the Cubitt Steps Bridge.

Portugal

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

4: Liquid Sound by Entertainment Effects, Cabot Square
Once again, the much-loved fountain in Cabot Square has a makeover for Winter Lights with a display of music and light.

UK

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

5: Absorbed by Light by Gali May Lucas, Cabot Square
Take a seat in between the three figures of Absorbed by Light, designed by the British Gali May Lucas and executed by Berlin-based sculptor Karoline Hinz.
Experience how it feels to be next to the characters on the bench.

UK

6: Sky on Earth by UAII Studio, Columbus Courtyard
This atmospheric UK premiere is inspired by the experience of a night flight over storm clouds. Columbus Courtyard will be transformed into an electrifying life sized cloud made of foam.

Czech Republic

7: Time & Tide by Paul & Pute, Columbus Courtyard
Time & Tide, with its hourglass design and colours inspired by nature, reminds us of the urgency of halting the plastic pollution of our oceans.

UK / Thailand

8: Shish-ka-buoy by Angus Muir Design, Westferry Circus
This fun installation is equally interesting by day as it is under the cover of darkness; during daylight hours, the large cluster landlocked six metre tall buoys absorb the light and give off a magical glow.
By night, thousands of LEDs inside create a whirl of colours and spherical gradients in this installation made from fully recyclable polyethylene marine buoys.

New Zealand

9: Lactolight by Lactolight, Westferry Circus
7,344 recycled plastic milk bottles become individual pixels in a giant low-res video screen. Programmed light depicting colours and patterns combined with a custom built soundscape gives you an overall sensory experience.

UK

10: Stratum by Studio Chevalvert, Westferry Circus
Stratum is an interactive installation made up of 92 illuminated metal totems. Visitors are invited to move their hand over the sensor to trigger movement in the artwork.

France

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

11: Mountain of Light by Angus Muir Design, Wren Landing
Mountain of Light is a monolithic installation, towering to a height of four meters and brought to life by a dramatic repertoire of lighting effects that begin with subtle changes in shade and culminate in an intense mash up of colours.

New Zealand

12: Ditto by Ithaca Studio, Wren Landing
A column of light repeating infinitely above and below the audience. Enter the space and experience light and sound swirling around overhead and underfoot trailing into infinity and creating beautiful reflections and colours in both daytime and evening.

UK

13: Luma Paint Light Graffiti by Lichtfaktor and Bomber Graffiti, Crossrail Place Roof Garden
Create your own unique light painting!
In 2008 Lichtfaktor developed the first real time Light Painting Software. It works on any object, from cars to buildings, transforming almost any object into a living paint canvas so you can create stunning paintings in just a few seconds.

Germany

14: Aquatics by Philipp Artus, Crossrail Place, Level -1, Quayside
Animated water creatures swim and dive around each other in this mesmerizing and delightful interactive light installation.

Germany

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

15: Desire by UxU Studio, Crossrail Place, Level -1, Quayside
Desire is a playful, sensual design that at first glance looks like giant, red lips. From the side, the image of the lips disappears, and you see a heartbeat instead – a heart beating faster with strong desires.

Taiwan

16: Constellations by Studio Joanie Lemercier, North Dock, viewing point at Crossrail Place, Level -1 Quayside
Making its London debut, Joanie Lemercier’s Constellations takes us on a trip through space with visuals projected onto a giant water screen with an electronic soundscapes by producer Paul Jebanasam.

France / Belgium

17: Seed of Life by Amberlights, Canada Place, Level -1, outside Waitrose
Enter the Seed of Life and discover a metallic rainbow spectrum of colours created by reflections and refractions from the natural elements of the daylight.

UK

18: Lightbench by LBO Lichtbank, Canada Square Park
A firm Canary Wharf favourite, our ten stunning light benches, form part of the permanent art collection.
Germany
Location 18 on our Winter Lights map

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

19: Neon Tree by Hawthorn, Canada Square Park
Neon flex will transform a tree into a striking sculpture in the heart of Canada Square Park. This colourful display will shine subtly by day and dazzle by night.

UK

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

20: The Bra Tree, Canada Square Park
Drawing inspiration from a tradition on the American ski slopes of throwing your bra onto a tree, Canary Wharf will host their own special illuminated version.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

21: Affinity by Amigo & Amigo and S1T2, Montgomery Square
Affinity is an immersive, interactive light sculpture inspired by the dazzling complexity and connectivity of the human brain.

Australia

22: Pools of Light, Jubilee Park
The ponds at Jubilee Park are getting a makeover for Winter Lights. See them transformed by thousands of colourful illumined orbs, weaving a stunning stream of light and sound through the park.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

23: Squiggle by Angus Muir Design, Jubilee Park
Squiggle is a winding mass of 450 metres of digital neon tubing twisting and turning to fill Jubilee Park. This unique sensory journey is created by the artist’s innovative manipulation of space and sense.

New Zealand

24: 16 bits by Parker Heyl, Jubilee Place
Parker Heyl has a mechanical engineering and robotics background and is interested in kinetic sculpture for live performance.The installation was developed as part of the Analog Future project at the Interactive Architecture Lab at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL

USA

25: Chromatic Play by Tine Bech Studio, Jubilee Park
These fun, illuminated sculptures invite you to interact with them. Each glowing creature has alien-like antennae fitted with interactive sensors, so when a visitor is in close proximity their presence is detected and the colours begin to change.

Denmark

26: SASHA Trees by ADAM DecoLight, Ten Bank Street Park
Ten Bank Street becomes a magical winterscape as this new park is illuminated with glowing fir trees. The striking neon colours of the trees create a fantastic contrast with the surrounding buildings.

Estonia

Behind many of the installations are serious intentions to raise awareness of environment and social issues. On a cold  winter evening, a walk around the festival will brighten the spirits and with lots of food and drink options is a fun evening out.

Canary Wharf Winter Lights Festival

16th to 25th January 4-10 pm
Throughout Canary Wharf
Canary Wharf
London
FREE

For more information, visit the Canary Wharf website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Green London Spaces: Grosvenor Square in Mayfair

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Grosvenor Square is one of the largest garden squares in the Mayfair district, the square was first developed in the 18th century. Sir Richard Grosvenor began to develop Grosvenor Square and the surrounding streets in 1710, and development continued throughout the 18th century. It soon began to attract leading members of the aristocracy and became of the most fashionable residential addresses in London.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many of the houses were rebuilt the 19th century and 20th century when many of the older houses were demolished to make way for up market blocks of flats, hotels and embassies.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Grosvenor Square has long been associated with the official American presence in London, John Adams who established the first American mission to the Court of St. James’s in 1785 lived in the house which still stands on the corner of Brook and Duke Streets. During the Second World War, Dwight D. Eisenhower established a military headquarters at 20 Grosvenor Square. Until 2009, the United States Navy continued to use this building as its headquarters for United States Naval Forces Europe. The former American Embassy of 1938–1960 on the square was purchased by the Canadian government and renamed Macdonald House.

In 1960, a new United States Embassy was built on the western side of Grosvenor Square, it was not without controversy with many people suggesting that a large embassy inserted in a large residential area was a recipe for disaster. The critics did not have to wait long before being proven correct, in 1968, there were large violent demonstrations in the square against US involvement in the Vietnam War. Security was tightened with a number of anti-terrorist devices have been installed around the embassy.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 2008, the United States Government chose a site for a new embassy south of the River Thames and the building was sold, however the new owners will not be allowed to change the façade, which includes the 35-foot-wingspread gilded-aluminium eagle that hovers above the main entrance.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The square includes a number of American related statues including Franklin D. Roosevelt, Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and a Eagle Squadrons Memorial.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The central garden, which was originally reserved for the use of the residents of the houses is now a public park managed by The Royal Parks. At the eastern end of the garden there is a small memorial dedicated to the British victims of the September 11 attacks. The memorial includes a granite block engraved with the names of the victims and the poem by Henry van Dyke.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short History of Paddington Basin

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Paddington and Grand Junction Canal was built after the success of the Duke of Bridgewater’s canal between Liverpool and Manchester. The Paddington Canal was a 13.5-mile long waterway, which terminated in a four-acre area of water called the Paddington Basin opened for traffic in 1801 to great public rejoicings with bells ringing, flags, and cannons were fired.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This early excitement was replaced in the 1850s by concern when the Regent’s Canal was opened which led to a deterioration in trade. Around Paddington Basin were built wharves and warehouses dealing mostly with bricks, clay, coal, hay, cattle and vegetables.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the late 20th century, there were little need for warehouses and little business on the water and into the 21st century, a major redevelopment took place in the Paddington Basin area. Most of the development was modern buildings which housed small and medium-sized commercial offices for companies like Marks & Spencer. Most of the land north of the canal basin formed Merchant Square which included offices, homes and shops.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Basin includes a couple of unusual bridges, The Rolling Bridge was conceived by Thomas Heatherwick and The Merchant Square Footbridge (also known as The Fan Bridge).

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Merchant Square includes a life-size sculpture in memory of Sir Simon Milton who played a pivotal role in facilitating the regeneration of Paddington Basin. The Paddington Arm and Basin now includes a number of narrow boats and other boats and the water is surrounded by bars, restaurants and cafés.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is even a couple of floating restaurants and the area is now given over to leisure which is becoming very popular with people enjoying some peace and quiet next to the water and away from the surrounding busy streets.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Head of a Laughing Child: Rare London Sculpture displayed at the Victoria and Albert Museum

The V&A have announced it has acquired a previously unknown porcelain sculpture Head of a Laughing Child (about 1746–49) after its chance discovery at a French flea market eight years ago. Following extensive research, the V&A revealed that the sculpture was almost certainly cast from an original clay model made by the renowned French-born sculptor Louis-François Roubiliac, who was active in London in the 1740s. The sculpture is now on display in the museum’s British Galleries, alongside some of the earliest examples of English porcelain.

Detailed research has confirmed it was made at London’s Chelsea porcelain factory, England’s first major porcelain factory established in 1743. The sculpture’s glassy body and glaze, as well as the surface pitting, are typical of the early experimental period at the Chelsea porcelain factory.

Roubiliac was the creator of the original model for Head of a Laughing Child. Roubiliac was a friend of Nicholas Sprimont, the owner and founder of the Chelsea porcelain factory, and evidence suggests Roubiliac considered using Chelsea porcelain for a major sculptural commission in the first few months of the factory’s opening. Additionally, the quality of modelling and the style of the Head, which combines Italianate, French and German influences, all point to Roubiliac as the author of the work. This is supported by documentary evidence revealing Roublilac’s roots and training in both France and Dresden, where he acquired extensive knowledge of Ancient Roman and Baroque sculpture.

Roubiliac would have sculpted the head in clay approximately 20 per cent bigger than the resulting porcelain figure. From this model, multi-part plaster moulds were taken at the Chelsea porcelain factory and then used to cast several versions of the head in porcelain. These were then carefully dried in a process that saw them shrink considerably. The porcelain heads were then glazed and fired at a high temperature.

Only one other porcelain example of Roubiliac’s Head of a Laughing Child is known to exist. Discovered in 1938, it has been in the Ashmolean Museum’s collection since 1965. The Ashmolean sculpture is decorated with polychrome enamel, unlike the V&A’s monochrome white example. In 2012 the two Heads were brought together for comparison, when experts from across the world confirmed that they were both cast from the same mould at the Chelsea porcelain factory. The plain white sculpture is more aesthetically pleasing, and its firing seems to have been more successful than that of the polychrome version.

The sculpture is displayed alongside Roubiliac’s porcelain figure of the painter William Hogarth’s infamous dog, Trump.

The V&A Ceramics collection encompasses the history of fine ceramic production from 2500 BC to the present day, with strengths in international contemporary studio ceramics, European porcelain and pottery from 1500 onwards, and ceramics from China, Japan and the Middle East.

For more information, visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan in Broadgate Arena

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Broadgate near Liverpool Street station is the location of a number of fascinating works of art, one of the most popular is Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan. Flanagan was born in 1941, in North Wales. In the 1950s, he studied architecture at Birmingham College of Art and Crafts and sculpture at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London from 1964 to 1966.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

He was best known for several permanent public sculptures, such as his giant bronze Hare on Bell in Man in New York, Thinker on a Rock in Washington, D.C and Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell at Broadgate. The sculpture in Broadgate is made of patinated bronze and was unveiled in 1988.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All these sculptures show the playfulness of Flanagan’s work, play was an important aspect of his work. He had his first solo show in London in 1960s followed by exhibitions in Amsterdam, in Berne and the Hayward Gallery.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In his later work, the hare became Flanagan’s emblem, he was fascinated by its fun and symbolic nature. Flanagan’s hares are well known public sculptures all around the world. Flanagan died in 2009 of motor neurone disease.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Walk along the Regent’s Canal in London

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although the River Thames dominates the centre of London, there are other waterways that offer plenty of interest to visitors to London. The Regent’s Canal in the north of London takes walkers into London’s industrial past, past the famous Camden market, through Regent’s Park, past London Zoo and ends with a colourful collection of narrowboats at Little Venice.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal links the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal in the west, to the Limehouse Basin in the east. This section is around 13.8 kilometres (8.6 miles) long. However it is the section from King’s Cross to Paddington that is the most popular with walkers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal was designed by famous Regency architect John Nash who named the canal after his main patron, the Prince Regent, son of King George III who later become George IV. The canal was opened in 1820 and from the the mid 19th century, the canal had become busy and profitable. It was especially important for bringing timber, building materials and coal to King’s Cross Station from the industrial north. A new retail park behind King’s Cross Station called Coal Drops Yard uses some of the old storage warehouses. The canal as a working highway declined in the late 20th century and is mainly used now for leisure cruising and the tow path is used extensively by walkers and cyclists.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many walks start from behind King’s Cross Station near to the Camley Street Natural Park where the towpath goes to Battlebridge Basin, home of the London Canal Museum.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gradually you come across to the vibrant Camden Lock, Camden markets are world famous and one of London’s major attractions. It is great place to take a break and enjoy the wonderful selection of street food.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the delights of Camden comes the more peaceful Cumberland Basin, with its moored boats and quick succession of low road and rail bridges.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

From the scenic, we go exotic with a number of wild animals on the other bank inside London Zoo, high above the towpath is a huge aviary designed by Lord Snowdon.

Look out for ‘Blow Up Bridge’, a boat full of gunpowder exploded here in 1874 demolished the bridge and the bridge had to be rebuilt.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A more peaceful section take you around Regent’s Park, a number of white mansions line the canal with large gardens running down to the water.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The relative quiet of Regent’s Park is replaced by the more busy Warwick Avenue with plenty of moored boats before finishing at the pool of Little Venice which is a picturesque open space lined with boats and surrounded by Regency houses. Boat trips run from here, there is a boat café and even a Puppet Barge theatre.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

If you are looking for something different away from the usual tourist trails, a walk along Regent’s Canal offers a great deal of variety in a walk through the north of London.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Follow me on Twitter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.