TAYLOR WESSING PHOTOGRAPHIC PORTRAIT PRIZE 2021 at Cromwell Place from 10 November 2021 until 2 January 2022

Three international photographers have been shortlisted for the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2021, the prestigious photography award organised by the National Portrait Gallery, London. The shortlisted works will be displayed in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2021 exhibition at Cromwell Place, a new arts hub in South Kensington, London from the 10 November 2021 until 2 January 2022, while the Gallery’s building in St Martin’s Place is closed for major redevelopment works.

Selected by a panel of judges from 5,392 entries from 2,215 photographers, the shortlisted photographers are:

Katya Ilina for her portrait David

Pierre-Elie de Pibrac for his series of portraits Hakanai Sonzai

David Prichard for Tribute to Indigenous Stock Women in Queensland, Australia.

The annual Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize, now celebrating fourteen years under Taylor Wessing‘s sponsorship, is one of the most prestigious photography awards in the world and showcases new work submitted by some of the most exciting contemporary photographers. The winner of the first prize will receive £15,000. The second prize-winner receives £3,000 and the third prize £2,000. The winner will be announced on Monday 8 November 2021.

The prize-winning photographs and those selected for inclusion in the exhibition were chosen from 5,392 submissions entered by 2,215 photographers from 62 countries. A total of 55 portraits from 26 artists have been selected for display in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2021 exhibition.

Judged anonymously, the diversity of styles in the exhibition reflects the international mix of entries as well as photographers’ individual and varied approaches to the genre of portraiture. Photographers were again encouraged to submit works as a series in addition to stand-alone portraits.

This year’s judging panel was chaired by National Portrait Gallery Director, Dr Nicholas Cullinan, who was joined by curator Mariama Attah from the Open Eye Gallery in Liverpool; photographer and Chair of the Southbank Centre, Misan Harriman; curator and writer, Dr Susan Bright, and National Portrait Gallery Senior Curator, Photographs, Magda Keaney.

For more information, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Code Name Mary: The extraordinary life of Muriel Gardiner at the Freud Museum from 18 September 2021 to 23 January 2022

The Freud Museum in London presents a new exhibition which explores and celebrates the remarkable story of Muriel Gardiner’s life, through family photo albums, unpublished documents and Muriel’s own autobiography, Code Name Mary.

Muriel Gardiner was born in the USA, however in the 1920s she travelled to Europe, attended Oxford University, and moved to Vienna where she hoped to be analysed by Sigmund Freud. In Vienna she had a short-lived marriage to a British musician Julian Gardiner, by whom she had a daughter Connie.

In Vienna Muriel Gardiner studied medicine, and in the 1930s became increasingly involved in political activities against the repressive Austrian regime which had come to power in 1934. Under the code name ‘Mary’, she smuggled money and procured false passports for people fighting the regime. Her apartment was used as a safe-house for anti-fascist dissidents, while fugitives hid in her cottage deep in the Vienna Woods. She fell in love with, and later married, Joseph Buttinger, leader of the Austrian Revolutionary Socialists.

At the outbreak of the Second World War, Gardiner returned to the US with her husband and daughter, where they worked to bring as many German and Austrian refugees to America as possible.

After the Second World War, Muriel Gardiner continued to be active in many causes. She had a busy psychoanalytical practice, taught at various universities, and published several books. These included The Wolf-Man and Sigmund Freud, about Freud’s most famous patient, Sergei Pankejeff. Muriel had known Pankejeff in Vienna, and supported him after the suicide of his wife, helping him make his way to London in 1938.

The film ‘Julia’ based on Lillian Hellman’s book Pentimento was believed to be based on Muriel Gardiner, although Hellman denied this. The controversy encouraged Muriel Gardiner to finally tell her own story in Code Name: Mary, published in 1983, which is reprinted for this exhibition.

Muriel Gardiner was instrumental in the establishment of the Freud Museum in London. She worked with Anna Freud to make the creation of a museum possible after Anna Freud’s death, financing it through her family foundation. Her Foundation continued to support the Museum for many years. Muriel Gardiner herself died in 1985, aged 84.

This fascinating exhibition tells the incredible story of Muriel Gardiner who in many ways was an unsung heroine, saving the lives of countless individuals from the Austrian fascist, and then the Nazi, regime. Her connection to Freud’s work and friendship with Anna Freud provided an inspiration for her own psychoanalytical practice which carried on until her death.

The Freud Museum was the final home of Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, and his daughter Anna Freud, a pioneering child psychoanalyst. The Freud family came to England as refugees, having escaped Austria following the Nazi annexation in March 1938. The Freuds bought many of their belongings to London. The heart of the house is Sigmund Freud’s study and his famous psychoanalytic couch. Freud spent the last year of his life here, and died in his study at Maresfield Gardens.

The house remained the family home until Anna’s death in 1982. Anna bequeathed the house to become a museum. The museum opened its doors to the public in 1986.

Entry to the house includes a free visit to the exhibition

Exhibition Dates
18 September 2021 to 23 January 2022

Opening Times
Wednesday: 10:30 – 17:00
Saturday: 10:30 – 17:00
Sunday: 10:30 – 17:00

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Freud website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review : Summer Exhibition 2021 at the Royal Academy from 22 September 2021 – 2 January 2022

The Royal Academy presents this year’s Summer Exhibition, which has been delayed to the autumn for the second time in its long history due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. At a time when artists have been denied important opportunities to show work, the 253rd Summer Exhibition is a unique celebration of contemporary art and architecture, providing a vital platform and support for the artistic community. It remains the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show and has been held every year without interruption since 1769, even throughout the war years.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Yinka Shonibare RA is the co-ordinator of the Summer Exhibition 2021 and the exhibition will explore the theme of ‘Reclaiming Magic’ to celebrate the joy of creating art. Shonibare said “This exhibition seeks a return to the visceral aspects and the sheer joy of art making.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Invited artists this year will include Michael Armitage, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Ellen Gallagher, Rita Keegan, Jade Montserrat, Magdalene Odundo, Faith Ringgold and Betye Saar. New work for the exhibition will be shown by Alvaro Barrington, Angela de la Cruz, Hew Locke, Cassi Namoda, and Lawrence Lemaoana, who has created a large-scale textile kanga. The exhibition has a special dedication to the self-taught American artist Bill Traylor (1853 – 1949) who was born into slavery and only began to draw his recollections and observations in 1939. Further self-taught artists will include Souleymane Fall, Nnena Kalu, Frantz Lamothe, Bärbel Lange, Marie-Rose Lortet, Frank Walter and Johnson Weree.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

David Adjaye RA is curating this year’s Architecture Room which will consider architecture through the expression of ‘Climate and Geography (or vice versa)’ focusing on the context of site, geography, climate, political climate, people, community and culture. Royal Academician architects featured will include Farshid Moussavi, Richard Rogers and Caruso St John, and invited architects will include Sean Canty, Counterspace and Atelier Masomi. As part of the sound programme, Peter Adjaye, a conceptual sound artist, has created a ‘soundtrack’ for the Architecture Room.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In addition to the large number of public submissions, Royal Academicians and Honorary Academicians will be showing new works, including Allen Jones, Phyllida Barlow, William Kentridge, Conrad Shawcross, Wolfgang Tillmans and Rose Wylie.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is one of the great English Art traditions, it is the world’s oldest open-submission exhibition being established in 1768 whose long line of exhibitors reads like a Who’s Who of British Art. Some of the earliest exhibitors included the likes of Reynolds, Constable and Turner, however the exhibition prides itself that it offers a snapshot of contemporary art.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Part of the fun is walking around the exhibition and spotting work by established artists, work that particularly caught my eye was Der Gordische Knoten by Anselm Kiefer, Matrix VII by Antony Gormley, Bethnal Green and Mont Blanc by Jock McFadyen and Lovelocks Whole Earth by Frank Bowling.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Each room offers a kaleidoscope of colour and images in a range of media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture and architectural works.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Works from all over the world are judged democratically on merit and the final selection is made during the eight-day hang in the galleries. This year the Royal Academy received over 15,000 entries, of which around 1200 works, in a range of media, will go on display. This open, inclusive and democratic show supports the artistic community and art education.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The majority of works in the Summer Exhibition are for sale, offering visitors an opportunity to purchase original work. Funds raised support the exhibiting artists, the postgraduate students studying in the RA Schools and the not-for-profit work of the Royal Academy.

© 2021 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition has a large number of wonderfully eclectic works on display, there is really something for everyone regardless of your particular artistic taste. The Summer Exhibition is one of the highlights of the art world and usually attracts a wide range of visitors. It also offers a rare opportunity to buy works from well-known and not so well-known artists with prices ranging from a few hundred to over a hundred thousand pounds.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain from 3 November 2021 to 20 March 2022

Few artists have defined an era as much as William Hogarth (1697-1764), whose satirical depictions of 18th century England provided a visual backdrop to the period. Tate Britain’s major exhibition Hogarth and Europe will present his work in a fresh light, seen for the first time alongside works by his continental contemporaries. It will explore the parallels and exchanges that crossed borders and the cosmopolitan character of Hogarth’s art. Hogarth’s best-known paintings and prints, such as Marriage A-la-Mode 1743, The Gate of Calais 1748 and Gin Lane 1751, will be shown alongside works by famous European artists, including Jean-Siméon Chardin in Paris, Pietro Longhi in Venice, and Cornelis Troost in Amsterdam.

William Hogarth
The Painter and his Pug, 1745
Tate

Featuring over 60 of Hogarth’s works, brought together from private and public collections around Europe and North America, the exhibition will draw on decades of research to show Hogarth in all his complexity – whether as staunch patriot or sharp critic, bawdy satirist or canny businessman. It will also examine the shifting status of artists in the 18th century, from workshop artisans and court painters to independent freelancers enjoying prominence alongside actors, musicians and writers.

William Hogarth
The March of the Guards to Finchley 1749 – 1750
© The Foundling Museum

The rapid expansion of urban centres like London, Paris, Amsterdam and Venice also saw the city itself become a major subject in art for the first time. Tate Britain will juxtapose these metropolitan scenes from across Europe, showing the bustling London streets of Hogarth’s Southwark Fair 1733 and The March of the Guards to Finchley 1749-50 together with depictions of Étienne Jeaurat’s Paris and Longhi’s Venice.

William Hogarth
Gin Lane, 1751
Andrew Edmunds

This was an age of opportunity and innovation, but also materialism, self-delusion, exploitation and injustice. In Europe, new heights of luxury emerged with extreme poverty, while growing cities saw overcrowding and disease. The rising demand for consumer goods at home came at the expense of the labour and lives of enslaved and colonised people overseas. Against the backdrop of this changing world, artists like Hogarth pioneered a new painting of modern life, revealing its pleasures and dynamism but also its dangers and stark inequalities.

William Hogarth
Marriage A-la-Mode: 2, The Tête à Tête, 1743-45
© The National Gallery, London

In the 1730s he began his ‘modern moral series’: narratives charting the rise and fall of everyday characters corrupted by immorality and vice. Hogarth and Europe will showcase these celebrated series, including A Rake’s Progress 1734, which were immediately popular and widely circulated through print.

William Hogarth
Miss Mary Edwards, 1742
The Frick Collection, New York, photo: Joe Coscia Jr.

The 18th century also saw greater informality and ease in portraiture, expressing the new ideas emerging around individuality and personal freedom that remain familiar today. The exhibition will culminate in a room focussing on such pictures, including Miss Mary Edwards 1742 – a painting not seen in the UK for over a century – depicting the eccentric, wealthy patron who commissioned many of Hogarth’s best-known works. Additional highlights will include paintings of his sisters Mary and Anne Hogarth, as well as Heads of Six of Hogarth’s Servants c.1750-55. The exhibition will look afresh at these and many other works by one of Britain’s most important artists, giving visitors a chance to see Hogarth’s position on the international stage in a new light.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Jazz FM Awards 2021 at Under the Bridge on October 28th 2021

The nominees for the Jazz FM Awards 2021 have been announced, recognising a diverse array of artists from the UK and abroad who have made a significant impact on the genre. This year’s ceremony will take place at Under The Bridge in West London on October 28th 2021 and will be available to livestream via Jazz FM. The Awards will celebrate music created and released between 1st January 2020 to the end of May 2021 to reflect the jazz community’s creativity and innovation during the pandemic.

Nominees this year include star saxophonist Nubya Garcia, chart-topping singer Celeste, London soul collective SAULT, US pianist and singer Jon Batiste, fast-rising trumpeter Emma-Jean Thackray, producer and DJ Floating Points with the London Symphony Orchestra and Pharoah Sanders, neo-soul singer-songwriter Ego Ella May, revered British-Italian singer Georgia Mancio, and the legendary alto saxophonist Gary Bartz. The recipients of the special award categories, Lifetime Achievement Award, Gold Award and Impact Award will be announced in due course.

Since launching in 2013, the Jazz FM Awards has become one of the most anticipated events in the international jazz calendar honouring some of the true greats of the genre including the likes of Herbie Hancock, Quincy Jones, Gregory Porter, Norah Jones, Dame Cleo Laine, George Benson, Pat Metheny, Georgie Fame and Ahmad Jamal.

JAZZ FM AWARDS 2021: NOMINEES

BLUES ACT OF THE YEAR

Eric Bibb
Marcus Bonfanti
Ruthie Foster

BREAKTHROUGH ACT OF THE YEAR

Jas Kayser
Nathaniel Cross
Secret Night Gang

THE DIGITAL AWARD

Bandcamp Fridays
jazz re:freshed
Kansas Smitty’s

THE INNOVATION AWARD

Blue Note Re:imagined
EFG London Jazz Festival
SAULT

INSTRUMENTALIST OF THE YEAR

Amanda Whiting
Daniel Casimir
Ed ‘Tenderlonious’ Cawthorne

INTERNATIONAL JAZZ ACT OF THE YEAR

Christian McBride
Gary Bartz
Maria Schneider

SOUL ACT OF THE YEAR

Ego Ella May
Jon Batiste
Omar

VOCALIST OF THE YEAR

Celeste
Ego Ella May
Georgia Mancio

PUBLIC VOTE CATEGORIES

ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Fergus McCreadie: Cairn
Floating Points, London Symphony Orchestra, and Pharoah Sanders: Promises
Jon Batiste: WE ARE
Matthew Halsall: Salute To The Sun
Nubya Garcia: SOURCE
SAULT: UNTITLED (Black Is)

UK JAZZ ACT OF THE YEAR

Archipelago
Emma-Jean Thackray
Fergus McCreadie

Public voting is open now at http://www.jazzfmawards.com and will close on Friday September 24th.
The Jazz FM Awards 2021 is made possible with the support of PPL and PRS for Music, Mishcon De Reya, Travelzoo and Yamaha.

For more information and tickets, visit the Jazz FM website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Summer Exhibition 2021 at the Royal Academy from 22 September 2021 – 2 January 2022

The Royal Academy presents this year’s Summer Exhibition, which has been delayed to the autumn for the second time in its long history due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. At a time when artists have been denied important opportunities to show work, the 253rd Summer Exhibition will be a unique celebration of contemporary art and architecture, providing a vital platform and support for the artistic community. It remains the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show and has been held every year without interruption since 1769, even throughout the war years.

Yinka Shonibare RA is the co-ordinator of the Summer Exhibition 2021 and the exhibition will explore the theme of ‘Reclaiming Magic’ to celebrate the joy of creating art. Shonibare said “This exhibition seeks a return to the visceral aspects and the sheer joy of art making.

Invited artists this year will include Michael Armitage, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, Ellen Gallagher, Rita Keegan, Jade Montserrat, Magdalene Odundo, Faith Ringgold and Betye Saar. New work for the exhibition will be shown by Alvaro Barrington, Angela de la Cruz, Hew Locke, Cassi Namoda, andLawrence Lemaoana, who has created a large-scale textile kanga. The exhibition will be anchored to a special dedication to the self-taught American artist Bill Traylor (1853 – 1949) who was born into slavery and only began to draw his recollections and observations in 1939. Further self-taught artists will include Souleymane Fall, Nnena Kalu, Frantz Lamothe, Bärbel Lange, Marie-Rose Lortet, Frank Walter and Johnson Weree.

David Adjaye RA is curating this year’s Architecture Room which will consider architecture through the expression of ‘Climate and Geography (or vice versa)’ focusing on the context of site, geography, climate, political climate, people, community and culture. Royal Academician architects featured will include Farshid Moussavi, Richard Rogers and Caruso St John, and invited architects will include Sean Canty, Counterspace and Atelier Masomi. As part of the sound programme, Peter Adjaye, a conceptual sound artist, has created a ‘soundtrack’ for the Architecture Room.

In addition to the large number of public submissions, Royal Academicians and Honorary Academicians will be showing new works, including Phyllida Barlow, William Kentridge, Conrad Shawcross, Wolfgang Tillmans and Rose Wylie. John Akomfrah RA will have a dedicated gallery showing his video work Peripeteia, 2012.

This year, the Summer Exhibition will expand beyond the spatial and visual with a sound programme. The programme, which is intended to be played through personal headphones to enhance the experience of the exhibition, will include soundscapes and poetry by six artists.

Works from all over the world are judged democratically on merit and the final selection is made during the eight-day hang in the galleries. This year the Royal Academy received over 15,000 entries, of which around 1200 works, in a range of media, will go on display. This open, inclusive and democratic show supports the artistic community, art education and provides a display of creativity and joy for the public.

The majority of works in the Summer Exhibition will be for sale, offering visitors an opportunity to purchase original work. Funds raised support the exhibiting artists, the postgraduate students studying in the RA Schools and the not-for-profit work of the Royal Academy.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

London: Port City at the Museum of London Docklands from 22 October 2021 – 8 May 2022

At this time, the ‘Tuscania’ was operated by Cunard on the London – New York passenger route.

The Port of London is the subject of a major exhibition at the Museum of London Docklands in October, the exhibition entitled London: Port City explores how the Port of London has changed and shaped the city, its people, places and language, over centuries. The exhibition will trace more than 200 years of experiences and intense activity on a river.

The exhibition is in the Museum of London Docklands, itself originally part of West India Docks, London’s first enclosed dock system and packed with valuable cargoes from around the world from 1802 until its closure in 1980.

The first consignment of 28 railway carriages for Kenya & Uganda railways arriving at the Royal Albert Dock, lifted by the London Mammoth.

The exhibition will draw upon the extensive archives of the Port of London Authority (PLA) to present a wider picture of the complex operations that have enabled the Port to connect London to the rest of the world, from the final days of the 18th century to the creation of the huge London Gateway ‘mega port’ in the Thames Estuary. The exhibition will full of stories, incidents, major operations, characters, technological advances, pivotal moments, surprising details and little-known facts.

Imported bananas being handled at the Royal Docks.

Exhibition highlights include:

Revealing the stories behind 80 words and expressions that entered the English language and the place names of streets and pubs as a result of the docks including ‘crack on’, ‘aloof’ and ‘Mudchute’.

An impressive audio visual display that will transport visitors into the PLA control room, using large-scale projections to create a day in the life of the Port of London, with multiple spectacular views of the river and all of the activity happening 24 hours a day.

Deal porters being trained under Port of London Authority supervision at Surrey Docks.

An interactive timeline reveals stories from the docks since 1800, using 222 objects from the PLAs vast and eclectic archive. Material ranges from sandals with hollowed out soles to smuggle opium, seized in the 1870s, to original plans for the world’s most innovative purpose-built dock complexes.

Many of the dockers whose voices feature throughout the exhibition recall being hit by a heady aroma as a new cargo was unloaded or as they made their way through different areas of the docks. Visitors will experience a suite of distinct scents, carefully blended to capture the original pungency of the port.

Trade Winds: London, a new artwork by contemporary artist Susan Stockwell, using archive material and international currency to explore themes of international trade, economies, migration and empire. Elsewhere, a new artwork by Hilary Powell uses experimental photographic techniques and film to explore the container shipping industry and the people who keep it going.

Importantly, the exhibition will address the wider global context of London’s seaborne trade, most notably its historical dependence on the sugar trade and slavery. A document commemorating the original unveiling of the statue of merchant and slave owner Robert Milligan, which was removed from outside the museum in 2020, is displayed alongside original plans for docks.

For more information, visit the Museum of London Docklands website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review: Sophie Taeuber-Arp at Tate Modern from 15 July to 17 October 2021

Tate Modern’s presents a major exhibition of the work of Sophie Taeuber-Arp (1889-1943), this exhibition is the first in the UK to trace Taeuber-Arp’s as a painter, architect, teacher, writer, and designer of textiles, marionettes and interiors.

The exhibition brings together over 200 objects from collections across Europe and America, and provides evidence that Taeuber-Arp was one of the most innovative artists and designers of the 20th-century avant-garde challenging the borders between abstract art, design and craft.

After studying fine and applied arts in Munich, Sophie Taeuber-Arp began her career in Zurich, which became an international hub for the avant-garde during the First World War.

She became a successful textile practitioner and teacher whilst experimenting with non-figurative art. Her use of geometric shapes and grids plus the use of vibrant bold colours helped her to develop her own particular style which decorative artworks including beaded bags, jewellery, rugs, pillowcases and tapestries.

By the end of the war, Taeuber-Arp had become active within Zurich dada, the short-lived but influential artistic movement which sought to integrate abstraction and absurdity. The exhibition features her turned-wood ‘Dada Heads’.

She also embraced the performance side of dada, dancing at the legendary Cabaret Voltaire and creating marionettes for the avant-garde interpretation of the play ‘King Stag’. All of the original marionettes are on display at Tate Modern in the exhibition.

In the 1920s Taeuber-Arp explored the possibility of working on architecture and interior design for private houses and public buildings. The exhibition includes designs and furniture from these projects, such as the commission for the Aubette, a modernist entertainment complex in Strasbourg, created in collaboration with Arp and Theo Van Doesburg.

The commercial success of her architectural practice enabled Taeuber-Arp to design her own studio-house near Paris, which would become a focal point for international intellectuals such as Tristan Tzara, Max Ernst and James Joyce.

Taeuber-Arp’s involvement in the Parisian art scene prompted a return to painting in the late 1920s. She experimented with primary colours and abstract forms, going on to develop a series of compositions of rectangles and circles in the 1930s.

Fleeing Paris at the outbreak of the Second World War, Taeuber-Arp turned to drawing, the final room of the exhibition brings together the works she made while on the move and in exile, created before her tragic accidental death in 1943 aged 53.

This fascinating exhibition illustrates the considerable talents of Sophie Taeuber-Arp, unlike many artists of the period Taeuber-Arp explored practical applications of her artwork in many different types of media. These decorative artworks and the artist’s commercial nous may be one of the reasons that Taeuber-Arp is largely unknown. Many artists that bought together arts, crafts and fine art were often dismissed by the art world as designers not artists.

This exhibition, hopefully will address some of these narrow minded views of what Art is ? And promote the creative talents of a woman who followed her own artistic path to great effect.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

The Garden at Buckingham Palace from 9 July to 19 September 2021

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

If the idea of a stuffy museum fills you with post-lockdown dread, perhaps a wander around one of the most famous gardens in London will provide some attraction.

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

The garden at Buckingham Palace opens to visitors from 9 July and will be open to September, the grounds of Her Majesty The Queen’s official London residence can be explored through a self-guided tour for the first time. Following exceptional demand, additional tickets have been made available on dates throughout July to September.

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

Visitors will be free to explore a route through the garden that encompasses the 156-metre Herbaceous Border, plane trees planted by and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert and views of the island and its beehives across the 3.5-acre lake.

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

The unique opportunity to enjoy a picnic on one of the sweeping lawns will be part of the visit. Features in the south-west of the garden, including the Rose Garden, summer house and wildflower meadow, can be viewed through one of the guided tours that will run each day.

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

The historic 39-acre garden dates back to the 1820s when George IV turned Buckingham House into a palace. The garden is home to a remarkable array of flora and fauna, including rare native plants seldom seen in London. The garden has more than 1,000 trees, the National Collection of Mulberry Trees and 320 different wildflowers and grasses.

Daily talks by Visitor Services Wardens and trails for families are included as part of the visit. Art and craft activities will be available in locations throughout the garden for visitors with children on Mondays in July and August (from 19 July) and as part of two Family Festival days on 26 and 30 August, where Warden-led family tours will also be available.

Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2021. Photographer John Campbell

Unusual Buckingham Palace Garden facts

In 1762 Queen Charlotte established a menagerie in the garden. It included an elephant, monkeys and one of the first zebras ever seen in England.

The Queen hosts three Garden Parties a year at Buckingham Palace. Each is attended by 8,000 guests, who consume around 27,000 cups of tea, 20,000 sandwiches and 20,000 slices of cake.

Since 2008 the island in the lake has been home to five beehives, which produce around 160 jars of honey a year for use in the royal kitchens.

There are more than 1,000 trees in the garden, including 98 plane trees, 85 different species of oak and 40 different types of mulberry tree.

The Rose Garden contains 25 beds of roses. Each bed is planted with 60 rose bushes of a different variety, and no two adjacent beds are of a similar colour.

The garden’s Waterloo Vase weighs an estimated 19 tonnes and is an impressive 5.5m (18ft) tall. It was commissioned by the French Emperor Napoleon after his defeat at Waterloo in 1815 it was presented to the future George IV.

The garden’s meadows, which were once grazed by cows and goats, are now home to more than 320 different types of wildflowers and grasses.
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The Garden at Buckingham Palace opens from Friday, 9 July. Tickets are priced at £16.50 for adults. Garden Highlights Guided Tours should be booked with the main ticket and are priced at £6.50 for adults. Tours will run 12 times a day.

For more information, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Paula Rego at Tate Britain from 7 July to 24 October 2021

Paula Rego The Dance 1988. Tate © Paula Rego

Tate Britain presents the UK’s largest and most comprehensive retrospective of the work of Paula Rego. Rego who was born in Lisbon in 1935, helped to redefine figurative art and revolutionised the way in which women are represented. The exhibition tells the story of this artist’s remarkable life, highlighting the personal nature of much of her work and the socio-political context in which it is rooted.

Paula Rego Self-portrait in Red 1966. Museu Nacional de Arte Contemporanea do Chiado (Lisbon, Portugal) ©
Paula Rego

It reveals her broad range of references, from comic strips to history paintings. Featuring over 100 works including collage, paintings, large-scale pastels, drawings and etchings, the show spans Rego’s early work from the 1950s to her richly layered, staged scenes from the 2000s.

Paula Rego Interrogation 1950. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

In Interrogation 1950, painted at fifteen years of age, Rego asserted her commitment to denouncing injustices and in her paintings, collages and drawings from the 1960s to 70s, Rego fiercely opposed the Portuguese dictatorship, using a range of sources for inspiration including advertisements, caricatures and news stories. She also explored folk tales as representations of human psyche and behaviour, as with Brancaflor – The Devil and the Devil’s Wife in Bed 1975.

Paula Rego The Policeman’s Daughter 1987. Private collection © Paula Rego

Rego abandoned collage in 1980 and returned to painting, combining childhood memories with her experiences as a woman, wife and lover. The exhibition includes major paintings from this period such as examples from ‘The Vivian Girls’ series, in which girls rebel against a coercive society, and the seminal works that established Rego’s reputation when first exhibited at the Serpentine Gallery in 1988 including The Policeman’s Daughter 1987.

Many of these pictures relate to Rego’s relationship with her husband, the painter Victor Willing, who for many years suffered from multiple sclerosis and died in 1988.

Paula Rego Cast of Characters from Snow White 1996. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

Throughout her career, Rego has been fascinated with storytelling, the exhibition includes prints from her series Nursery Rhymes 1989 in which Rego explores the strangeness and cruelty of traditional British children’s songs.

As the first artist-in-residence at the National Gallery, Rego also took inspiration from art history, as in The Artist in Her Studio 1993.

The exhibition features Rego’s large pastels of single, female figures from the 1990s to 2000s, including the ‘Dog Woman’ and ‘Abortion’ series, some of the artist’s most celebrated and arresting pictures. Works from the ‘Abortion’ series, which the artist was proud to see used to campaign for the legalisation of abortion in Portugal, depict women in the aftermath of illegal abortions.

Paula Rego Possession I 2004 Collection Fundação de Serralves – Museu de Arte Contemporânea, Porto,
Portugal © Paula Rego

Possession 2004, another major series of pastels rarely exhibited, combines Rego’s personal experience of depression and therapy with inspiration from 19th century staged photographs of women diagnosed as suffering from ‘hysteria’.

Paula Rego The Pillowman 2004. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

The exhibition includes scenes of the artist setting up, drawing and painting in her studio throughout the 2000s. Seminal paintings from this period include War 2003 and The Pillowman 2004. The exhibition also brings together striking works addressing the issues of women’s trafficking and female genital mutilation. These powerful images confront difficult stories of pain and abuse that Rego feels need to be told.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

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