Caught by the River Social Club at Little Portland St – November and December 2017

Andrew Weatherall

Caught by the River began as an idea for an online meeting place for pursuits of a distinctly non-digital variety: walking, fishing, looking, thinking, birdsong and beer, adventure and poetry. Gradually a website paying homage to life’s small pleasures appeared and attracted a large number of followers. From these humble beginnings in 2007, Caught by the River have published a number of books and staged festivals around the country.

Adelle Stripe

Caught by the River, the online gathering place has now announced an offline meeting place with the creation of The Social Club, a season of monthly events, bringing its many obsessions to live audiences. Caught by the River Social Club will take place each month at The Social in Little Portland Street, London.

Martha Sprackland

Forthcoming Events

Caught by the River Social Club

Monday 6 November 2017 at 7.00pm

Live music from Marisa Anderson, whose original work re-imagines the landscape of American music and traverses electronic, drone and 20th century classical music, as well as blues, jazz, gospel and country music.

Joining Marisa Anderson will be Toby Hay, another musical storyteller.

Poetry will come from Caught by the River’s poet-in-residence, Martha Sprackland, currently working on her first full-length collection.

MC on the night is John Andrews; Earth Recordings’ Kyle Lonsdale is the DJ.

Tickets: £10 via http://www.wegottickets.com/event/412588

Marisa Anderson

Caught by the River and Faber Social Christmas Party

Wednesday 13 December 2017 at 7.00pm

Caught by the River joins forces with publishers, Faber, to take over their mutual regular haunt the Social. Over the course of the night, they will pull together a kind of greatest literary hits of the year party, featuring readings and talks from authors and fellow travellers, including:

David Keenan talking to Andrew Weatherall about This Is Memorial Device .

Adelle Stripe on her novel, Black Teeth and a Brilliant Smile

Daisy Eris reading from this year’s hugely lauded book 2023: A Trilogy by the Justified Ancients of Mu Mu.

MC on the night is John Andrews; poetry will be provided by Will Burns and music to fit the mood will be chosen by DJ Frances Castle (Clay Pipe Music) and Heavenly Jukebox.

Tickets: £12 advance via http://www.wegottickets.com/event/419917

David Keenan

Venue: The Social, 5 Little Portland St, London W1W 7JD

Tickets: http://www.wegottickets.com

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Advertisements

Review – Ilya and Emilia Kabakov : Not Everyone Will Be Taken into the Future at Tate Modern -18th October 2017 to 28th January 2018

To coincide with the 100th anniversary of the 1917 Russian Revolution, Tate Modern presents the first major museum exhibition in the UK of artists Ilya and Emilia Kabakov. The exhibition entitled Not Everyone Will Be Taken into the Future explores the couple’s place in the international story of conceptual art and offers the opportunity to view rarely seen works together for the first time in the UK.

The Kabakovs are have gained a reputation for their large-scale installations which draw upon the culture of the former Soviet Union and addresses universal themes such as utopia, dreams, fears and the human condition. The exhibition features around 100 works in a range of media, including paintings, drawings, albums, models and installations.

The exhibition begins with some of Ilya Kabakov’s early drawings from the 1960s and his innovative Ten Characters series of albums. His studio flat in Moscow was the centre of an unofficial Moscow art scene where he showed his work to fellow artists. Being an unofficial artist led Ilya Kabakov’s to begin to question the role of the artist in a state system.

The artist looked back to the past for a time in Russia when artistic experimentation was considered after the 1917 Revolution before the dominance of Social Realism in the 1930s restricted any meaningful artistic development.

In the 1980s, Ilya created The Man Who Flew into Space From His Apartment 1985, it was his first ‘total’ installation and explores how the communal apartments in the Soviet Union restricted any individual freedom.

With the sculptural installations, Trousers in the Corner 1989 and I Catch the Little White Men 1990, similar themes are revisited but the scale has changed.

Three Nights 1989 finds three large paintings obscured by a large screen which offers limited and unusual views.

One of the most dramatic installations is Not Everyone Will Be Taken into the Future by Ilya and Emilia in 2001, a train is leaving the station with those selected to be part of the future, discarded canvases are reminder that artists are often at the whims of patrons who discard them if they are unfashionable or not willing to toe the line.

The dissolution of the Soviet Union in the 1990’s becomes a theme for the Kabakovs in the 2000s, pictures resembling Soviet paintings are torn and ripped with different pieces bought together in a fragmented style. They seem to say that Social Realism has been torn apart by Social Reality.

The next installation, Labyrinth (My Mother’s Album) 1990 looks at the past on a more personal level, a corridor is full of photographs and collages telling the story of the artist’s mother.

This fascinating exhibition introduces the work Ilya and Emilia Kabakov to a wider audience and explores how Russian artists who were restricted by State system made sense of the decline of that system. Not Everyone Will Be Taken into the Future also explores the often transient nature of fame for artists, the title refers to an essay about Russian artist Kazimir Malevich who was one of the artistic heroes of the post 1917 Revolution Soviet Union before being discarded in the 1930s.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets , visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review – SUPERFLEX: One Two Three Swing! at Tate Modern from 3rd October 2017 to 2nd April 2018

The Tate Modern presents a large-scale interactive installation by Danish collective SUPERFLEX. One Two Three Swing! in the Turbine Hall.

Conceived as an incentive for collective movement, the work invites audiences to combat social apathy through collaborative action by swinging together to create motion for a large pendulum.

One Two Three Swing! challenges society’s apathy towards the political, environmental and economic crises of our age. The installation explores the Turbine Hall’s industrial history and its new role as an open space in the heart of an art gallery.

The free installation is experienced in three states: apathy, production, and movement. The state of apathy comprises a large pendulum suspended by a 20 metre cable from the ceiling and swinging above a 770 square metre carpet in a colour scheme inspired by British currency. Occupying the far end of the hall is the state of production, a factory station where swing seats are assembled, stamped and stored prior to distribution and use. Emerging from the state of production, an orange line formed of sets of interconnected, three-seated swings invite and frame the movements of users.

The pendulum swinging forms a hypnotic mechanical effect which is in contrast with the enjoyable and spontaneous experience of swinging together.

It is hoped over time, the work will evolve as the orange line continues to grow and new swings are added, spreading outside Tate Modern, into the urban landscape of London and potentially beyond into the wider world.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

December 2017 at the National Army Museum

This December at the National Army Museum you will be able to delve into the history of the Ritz, the Savoy, the Dorchester and Claridge’s – and the eccentrics, stars, aristocrats and criminals living in London’s grand hotels during the Blitz. Or listen to Chelsea Pensioner, John Carbis talk about notable female residents at the Royal Hospital. Whatever your interest or age there is something for you to enjoy the National Army Museum.

Talks

Communications and the Battle of Cambrai

1 December, 11.30am

Free

Dr Brian Hall examines the Battle of Cambrai through the perspective of the British Army’s communications system. Although a strategic failure, the Battle of Cambrai in November 1917 heralded tactical and operational methods that foreshadowed not only some of the war-winning techniques employed by the British Army in August-November 1918, but also elements of the initial German campaigns of the Second World War. Brian Hall examines the battle from the perspective of communications, assessing its influence upon the fighting and, ultimately, upon the British Army’s learning process.

Women Soldiers Tour

2 December, 2.30pm

Free

Explore 100 years of women in the army. Join us for a free 30-minute tour on the first Saturday of the month at 2.30pm. In 1917 the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps was founded. This was the first time women could join the army outside of nursing roles. Since then there have been a number of developments for women in the army, culminating in last year’s lifting of the ban on women in combat roles. Join us for a 30-minute guided tour of the galleries exploring the theme of women in the army.

Recce racers

2 & 3 December, 9 & 10 December, 16 December to 7 January

Free

Learn about army reconnaissance and have a go at making your own mini-vehicle to take home. At this family activity you’ll discover how the army uses vehicles for its reconnaissance missions. Have a go at making your own rubber-band powered vehicle and see how fast it will go on our track. Will your time be the one to beat?

Dental services in the British Army, 1914-18

8 December, 11.30am

Free

Join Rachel Bairtso and Fiona Gray of the British Dental Association Museum as they discuss how the army looked after its soldiers’ teeth during the First World War. At the outbreak of the First World War there was insufficient dental provision for serving military personnel. However, the pain of toothache and the inability to chew food was debilitating and demoralising for the British soldier. This talk will explore the state of the nation’s teeth and the treatments available at the time.

The life and work of Abram Games

15 December, 11.30am

Free

Naomi Games reveals the story of her father, Abram Games, who was appointed Official War Poster Artist during the Second World War. Games was one of the 20th century’s most innovative and important graphic designers. He produced some of Britain’s most enduring images, which are a now a fascinating record of social history. During the Second World War he was uniquely appointed Official War Poster Artist. It was Games’s personal philosophy of ‘maximum meaning, minimum means’ that gave his works their distinctive conceptual and visual quality.

Women at war

22 December, 11.30am

Free

Join Chelsea Pensioner, John Carbis, to explore the lives of three notable women who have resided at the Royal Hospital. Carbis, will discuss the experiences of three female out-pensioners in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries: Hannah Snell, Dr James ‘Miranda’ Stuart Barry and Christian Davies.

Book Club: The Wartime Secrets of London’s Grand Hotels

20 December, 6.30pm

Free

December’s Book of the Month is The Wartime Secrets of London’s Grand Hotels by Matthew Sweet in which he draws a sumptuous, witty and eye-opening history of the Ritz, the Savoy, the Dorchester and Claridge’s – and the eccentrics, stars, aristocrats and criminals living in London’s grand hotels during the Blitz. Explore our book of the month and unpack current issues, historical events and popular fiction through recent book releases related to the British Army. The Book Club meets on the last Wednesday of the month, from 7pm to 8pm. Complimentary snacks and wine are served from 6.30pm.

For more information , visit the NAM website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Festive fun for Christmas 2017 at Historic Royal Palaces

With festive season just around the corner, there’s a whole range of events at Historic Royal Palaces.

Hampton Court Palace will be welcoming in the holiday season with a series of Christmas-themed entertainment and activities, from carolling in the courtyards to a special Elizabethan Christmas. Visitors can take a spin on the ice at Hampton Court’s famous ice rink (24 November – 7 January), where the palace’s Tudor facade provides a suitably magnificent backdrop to this magical riverside setting.

The BBC Good Food’s Festive Feast returns for another year, setting mouths watering with over 50 stalls featuring handpicked producers, all filling the palace’s historic courtyards. It won’t just be delicious treats filling the air either, with the Christmas Music Weekend (16 – 17 December) promising traditional carols and sacred hymns within the walls of the Great Hall. Performed on traditional instruments just like those used at the court of Elizabeth I, this special event offers a wonderful mix of traditions old and new. On selected dates, visitors will also be treated to an ‘Elizabethan Christmas’, with Tudor-style courtyard entertainment, live period music and dance conjuring up the Christmas of 1592 with Elizabeth I and her court. The Tudor Queen herself will even be in residence for the celebrations!

Head to the Tower of London this Christmas where there will be a number of seasonal events for all to enjoy. The ice rink returns to the famous dry moat, where visitors can take in the majestic views of the capital from this iconic historic landmark. The Tower will also host a royal celebration, complete with Medieval Christmas festivities (27 – 31 December). Revel in the festivities with King Richard III, Queen Anne Neville, and the knights and ladies of medieval England with music, dance and games adding to the family entertainment. Meanwhile, Noel Noel promises to hit all the right notes with 500 years of music for Advent and Christmas performed in the atmospheric Chapel of St Peter ad Vincula. This sumptuous concert includes Spanish riffs, English traditional songs, melodies by Monteverdi and the original version of Silent Night.

Kensington Palace will also be suitably dressed for the occasion, with a Victorian Christmas theme running throughout the palace, complete with stunning lanterns, a gorgeous 25ft Christmas tree and a display of illuminated Victorian scenes. Running throughout the day on selected dates, visitors to the palace will also be able to experience the excitement of Queen Victoria’s Christmas with ‘Under the Christmas Tree’. This family-friendly event will see visitors being treated to Victoria’s memories of Christmas past, before being able to create their own beautiful Christmas decoration to take home. 16 December will see ‘Funtastic Saturday’ take place, where children can hear Christmas stories and create their very own Victorian puppet theatre. The ‘Tasty Talks’ will also return every Sunday throughout December, taking visitors on a fascinating journey through the story of the items that now grace our Christmas table and how they arrived there. Live music will also take place in the Queen’s State Apartments between Christmas and New Year, filling the palace with the sound of traditional festive music.

For more information , visit the HRP website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Wintertime at the Southbank Centre – 10th November 2017 to 4th January 2018

Wintertime at Southbank Centre presents a feast of offerings capturing the magic of winter from 10 November 2017 to 4 January 2018. The final season of Southbank Centre’s year-long exploration into Nordic arts and culture, Nordic Matters, Wintertime sees a one of a kind Finnish Rooftop Sauna in the picturesque roof garden of the Queen Elizabeth Hall overlooking London’s iconic River Thames (10 Nov – 30 Dec).

Danish children’s theatre company Teater Refleksion and theatre artist Andy Manley invite families and young children on a magical, poetic journey through the dark and beautiful night with Night Light (19 – 31 Dec),

Norwegian musician and the pioneer of ice instruments Terje Isungset presents a stunning live performance of his ethereal ice music (15 Dec) and an afternoon of Nordic themed activities, with music, storytelling and craft for all the family, brings the year-long Nordic Matters programme to a close (23 Dec).

The 17-acre site will be transformed into a winter landscape and the ever-popular Wintertime Market sees alpine chalets lined across Queen’s Walk offering the very best in global street food, artisan gifts and more.

Dubbed London’s pop-up King, Jimmy Garcia presents his pop-up alpine lodge dining experience and The Hoplocker Bar returns for a second year with their Nordic inspired Wintertime Bar, serving local and international hearty craft ales (10 Nov – 30 Dec).

The Rooftop Bar, sat above the bustle in the roof garden of Queen Elizabeth Hall, is the perfect spot to enjoy panoramic views across London following a Finnish Rooftop Sauna experience (10 Nov – 30 Dec).

A giant festive tree surrounded by clusters of smaller trees will take centre stage on the Festival Terrace, twinkly lights will run along Queen’s Walk and giant glittering baubles will shimmer in the Clore Ballroom.

Festive fun and entertainment will be in abundance including the brand new immersive exhibition ABBA: Super Troupers, a journey through the world of the Swedish chart-topping sensation (14 Dec 2017 – 29 April 2018) and the return of the multi award-winning international clowning sensation Slava’s Snowshow (18 Dec 2017 – 4 Jan 2018).

A jubilant programme of choirs and classical music includes the ever-popular Messiah by Candlelight (15 Dec) and the chance to join a carol singalong with the magnificent Royal Festival Hall organ (14 Dec.)

The spectacular A Vintage New Year’s Eve created by HemingwayDesign also returns for another unmissable year with five floors of entertainment and a private view of London’s world-famous fireworks (31 Dec).

There will be an array of free events to get everyone involved from dances to music performances including: an afternoon of Tango featuring introductory classes, tango performances, DJs and live music from La Terra Tango Band (28 Dec); a day inspired by ABBA with ABBA-oke and a fancy dress screening of the hit film Mamma Mia! (17 Dec); and the return of Rave-a-Roo Winter, an all inclusive dance party for the whole family (21 December). East London Drag Star Ginger Johnson presents Glamorous Gran! And other tall stories, a family Christmas show packed with music, dancing and glitter (30 Dec), Our Lady J, celebrated by Dolly Parton herself, performs some of the Queen of Country’s most beloved music, accompanied by The Train-To-Kill Gospel Choir (29 Dec) and Danish keyboardist and composer Morten Schantz performs futuristic electronic jazz from his Godspeed album (22 Dec).

For more information , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Hayward Gallery Touring presents a new exhibition of prints by Cornelia Parker – 10th November to 10th December 2017

Southbank Centre’s Hayward Gallery Touring presents One Day This Glass Will Break, an exhibition of twenty large-scale photogravures by Cornelia Parker from three experimental series: Fox Talbot’s Articles of Glass (2017); One Day This Glass Will Break (2015) and Thirty Pieces of Silver (exposed) (2015). Opening at londonprintstudio (10 November–10 December 2017) then touring throughout the UK, these three series, which are brought together for the first time in this exhibition, explore the artist’s fascination with the physical properties of objects, materials and their histories.

The exhibition includes eight works from the series One Day This Glass Will Break (2015) which arose from Parker’s investigations into the photogravure, a photomechanical process which produces an image through the exposure of a photographic positive onto a copper printing plate. Inspired by the 19th century photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, Parker combined two of his early techniques, solar prints and the photogravure, creating a new hybrid form of print by exposing three-dimensional objects to ultraviolet light. In these works, she uses found objects such as a tower of crystal glasses, a shattered light bulb and melting ice cubes, with the resulting prints capturing their shadows in a spectral still life.

In Fox Talbot’s Articles of Glass (2017), a series of nine prints, Cornelia Parker explores this technique further using the last remaining items of glassware belonging to Fox Talbot, which he famously used in his early photograph, Articles of Glass (c. 1844), and are now housed in Oxford’s Bodleian Library. The artist arranged these historical objects in various informal compositions on the printing plate, with some with their museum labels still attached. The lead content of this early glassware produces darker shadows, resulting in prints that are richer and deeper in tone.

Two prints from another series, Thirty Pieces of Silver (exposed) (2015), are also included. Here, the artist uses found glass photographic negatives of antique silverware, originally produced for a 1960s Spink auction catalogue. Exposed to the photogravure plate in their original glassine bags, the negatives appear as physical, dimensional objects themselves. This series evokes a major early work by Cornelia Parker, Thirty Pieces of Silver, (1988-89), which consisted of over a thousand pieces of silver flattened by a steamroller and suspended on wires hovering above the gallery floor.

Tour details

10 November – 10 December 2017   londonprintstudio, London

16 December – 28 January 2018   Royal West of England Academy, Bristol

3 February – 11 March 2018       Brentwood Road Gallery, Romford

17 March – 3 June 2018           The Wilson,Cheltenham

7 July – 2 September 2018       mac, Birmingham

10 September – 13 October 2018   East Gallery, Norwich

12 January – 17 February 2018   Gerald Moore Gallery, Eltham

29 June – 4 August 2018       Oriel Wrecsam, Wrexham

For more information , visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Follow me on Twitter

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.