To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts and the Supernatural at the Charles Dickens Museum from 5 October 2022 to 19 February 2023

A new exhibition at the Charles Dickens Museum entitled To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts & the Supernatural celebrates Dickens’s interest in the paranormal. Opening in time for Halloween, the exhibition runs from 5 October 2022 – 19 February 2023 at 48 Doughty Street, Holborn, the home of Dickens and his family in the late 1830s.

Charles Dickens wrote twenty ghost stories throughout his life, published from 1836 onwards. From A Christmas Carol to The Signal Man, to elements of Bleak House and Nicholas Nickleby, as well as The Chimes and The Trial for Murder.

The exhibition brings together a collection of objects, posters, letters and books to reveal just how much Dickens enjoyed creating eerie scenes, disturbing characters and building tension to toy with the emotions of his audiences. It will be accompanied by a new programme of events, including after-hours house tours, as well as haunting soundscapes in Dickens’s home.

Among the highlights of the exhibition:

The first public display of a letter from Dickens to his spiritually-minded acquaintance, William Howitt, in which Dickens asks whether Howitt can suggest a haunted house that his friend might visit. On 31 October 1859, Dickens writes to Howitt about ghosts and asks whether he knows of “any haunted house whatsoever within the limits of the United Kingdom where nobody can live, eat, drink, sit, stand, lie or sleep without sleep-molestation” as he has a friend ready to pit himself against it.

Charles Dickens’s own copy of The Haunted Man, his 1848 ghost story. Dickens physically altered copies of his books for his public readings, adding stage directions and, in this edition, uses different coloured inks to indicate deletions, express emotions and emphasise emotive words.

The first depiction of the four ghosts from A Christmas Carol. Pencil sketches by Dickens’s illustrator, John Leech, which were used in preparation of the full colour illustrations that featured in the first edition of the book in December 1843. While Dickens was undeniably fascinated by the notion of ghosts and hauntings, he was certainly skeptical, becoming more so as he grew older. The skepticism finds its way into A Christmas Carol, as illustrated by this passage:

“You don’t believe in me,” observed the Ghost.
“I don’t,” said Scrooge.
“What evidence would you have of my reality beyond that of your senses?”
“I don’t know,” said Scrooge.
“Why do you doubt your senses?”
“Because,” said Scrooge, “a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats.”

The power of Dickens’s ‘in person’ performances of his tales was notorious, and he enjoyed evoking emotions in his live audiences, as well as his readers, with ghostly stories. He performed his ghost-laden A Christmas Carol reading 127 times and, after writing another Christmas book, The Chimes, gathered a crowd so he could test out the effects of the book.

Dickens was a lifelong admirer of ghostly fiction and influenced many who followed him, including Wilkie Collins and Elizabeth Gaskell. As a boy, Charles Dickens read the weekly horror magazine, The Terrific Register, later admitting that it had “frightened my very wits out of my head.” It is possible that its weekly publication influenced the way that Dickens marketed his own work, releasing his books in serial format. When he became an editor, a popular feature of his magazines Household Words and All the Year Round was the special Christmas number, which included, at various times, ghost stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, Wilkie Collins, Charles Collins, and Amelia B. Edwards.

Exhibition and Museum Information

To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts & the Supernatural
The Charles Dickens Museum, 48-49 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX
Dates: 5 October 2022 – 19 February 2023.
Opening hours: 10am to 5pm, Wednesday – Sunday (closed Mondays and Tuesdays)

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Summer of Special Events at the Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret

In its bicentenary year, Europe’s oldest operating theatre is welcoming visitors by day with new activities and by night to explore fascinating subjects in one of the most affecting and atmospheric historic settings in the country. As well as staging events on subjects wedded to its history, such as Victorian surgery and medicine and female health and anatomy, the stepped wooden theatre attic of St Thomas’ Church next to London Bridge station will become a venue for late events, talks and theatrical performances.

The Museum has launched a year of special bicentenary events, projects and new developments, including new installations, a full programme of events for visitors, a new guidebook and a research project designed to unearth the stories of the surgeons, nurses, students and patients who worked, studied or found themselves on the operating table at the theatre between 1822 and 1862.

From this summer, visitors to the Museum during daily opening hours will discover the stories of a series of historical characters, each of whom played their own varied roles on the site. Each visitor will be given their own character card on arrival and can choose to follow the lives and destinies of their adopted figure as they make their way around the Museum. Among the people featured are Ward Matron, Sarah Elizabeth Wardroper, patients Elizabeth Raigen and Amelia Jones, surgeon Benjamin Travers, medical student Hampton Weekes and porter James Smith.

The Museum will present a collection of medical exhibits from the collection of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital Trust. Chief among this collection of syringes, nipple shells, prescription spikes, medicine kits and apothecary bottles is a 16 th century pewter plate likely to have been used for feeding patients in the earliest days of the old St Thomas’ Hospital.

By day and after hours, the Old Operating Theatre becomes one of the most thrilling and unusual performance venues in the capital. Among the newly confirmed events:

Surgery & the Victorian Operating Theatre Live Event

Join us in the Old Operating Theatre, as we return to the Victorian era and reveal the surgical
procedures that happened before a large and noisy crowd in the attic space of an 18th centurychurch. You will explore the origins and history of Old St Thomas’ Hospital, before sitting in on demonstrations of the most common surgical procedures that too place in this original operating theatre 200 years ago, in the days before anaesthesia and antiseptics. Delve into the visceral horrors of surgery that helped pave the way to our modern medical procedures, in the oldest surviving surgical theatre in Europe. Dates: 30 th July, 27 th August, 24 th September, 29 th October, 26 th November.
10-11am. £12.

Vagina Obscura: How medicine “discovered” the clitoris

Female anatomy hasn’t changed much in the past two millennia—but our understanding of it certainly has. Join award-winning science journalist and author Rachel E. Gross on a journey into the past, present and future of perhaps the most-misunderstood organ in the human body: the clitoris.
Join us as we explore what scientists are finally learning about it, as well as how new insights about female genitals are helping medicine to better study and treat all bodies.
Date: 17 th August 2022. 7-8pm. £12.

Trephination for the Twenty-First Century

A one-woman exploration of invasive surgery combines psychological theory and theatrical technique to create an ardent and authentic performance of care. Amanda Grace’s work as a scholar of empathy and performer of care has been staged in fringe venues, around abandoned estates, and on proscenium stages across multiple continents. Date: 7th September 2022. 7-8pm. £20.

The Artificial Womb: In Conversation with Lisa Mandemaker. Virtual Event

An in-conversation event with Lisa Mandemaker, the designer of speculative project, the Artificial Womb. In the future, artificial wombs could replace incubators as they mimic the natural environment of the female uterus. But how will they look? And how should we respond to such technology if it comes knocking on our door? Date: 8th September 2022. 6-7pm. £5

MUSEUM LATE

A Quirky Evening at the Old Operating Theatre Museum & Herb Garret

Come and explore the Museum after dark, encounter the exhibitions at night (creepiness guaranteed!), grab a drink at the Apothecary Wine Bar, discover the tales of the bodysnatchers and participate in mysterious interactive experiences. Musical performance from Lunatraktors. A Museum late to celebrate the upcoming Autumn Equinox. Date: 21st September 2022. 7-9pm. £20.

Scenes from the City: A Civic Education

A new theatrical performance by Edward’s Boys, the all-boy company from King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon. Scenes from the City: A Civic Education explores how merchants were involved in the worlds of education and entertainment in early modern London. Edward’s Boys will present
ten scenes and songs from works by Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, and John Webster, ranging in tone from the celebratory to the bitterly satirical. Much of the material has not been publicly performed since the early seventeenth century. Date: 28th September 2022. 6.15-8.30pm. £20.

Circumcision on the Couch: The Cultural, Psychological and Gendered Dimensions of the World’s Oldest Surgery

Join us for a talk by Jordan Osserman about his recent book, Circumcision on the Couch. Penises, and the things people do with them, have been subjects of controversy for a long time. In this event, Jordan will make use of the surgical setting to bring to life some major themes of his book, including
the nineteenth-century transformation of circumcision from a religious rite to a medical procedure designed to cure ‘nervous illness’. The event will include a short performance, ‘The Foreskin Warriors’, by Greek performance art duo FYTA, and a panel discussion with scholars and clinicians.
Date: 29th September 2022. 6.15-8.15pm. £12.

Visitor Information
Address: Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret, 9a St Thomas Street, London, SE1 9RY.
Opening hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, 10.30am – 5.00pm. Access is limited as
the Museum is in the attic space of a 320-year-old church. The entrance is via a 52-step narrow spiral
staircase. Admission: Adult: £7.50; Concessions: £6.00; Child 6-16 years: £4.50; Children under 6
years: Free; Family (2 adults, 2 children): £18.00.

For more information and tickets, visit the Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Summer Events 2022 at the Charles Dickens Museum

This summer, the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street puts on a series of special events celebrating the stories and characters created by one the world’s greatest ever authors and exploring life at the only surviving London home of Dickens and his family.

Twists & Turns

Oliver Twist is one of the most famous novels ever written, yet it was not entirely a work of fiction. Join the Museum for a Twists & Turns walking tour and discover the real-life events, happiness, tragedy, people and places that shaped the tale of an unlikely hero. Uncover the criminal underbelly of Victorian London, from the real site of Fagin’s den, to the remnants of London’s most shocking slums. An immersive tour bringing the book to life.
Dates: 28th August, 25th September at 11am. £12.

Evening tours of 48 Doughty Street

Experience the magic of Charles Dickens with an intimate guided tour of his home. Begin your evening with a complimentary glass of wine in our courtyard garden and café, before stepping back in time to experience the Georgian townhouse. Hear about Charles Dickens’s rise to fame, the lifestyle of early Victorians and pick up some family gossip along the way.
Dates: 24th August & 21st September at 6pm. Adult: £20; Concession – £15; Child (Under 16) – £15.

Pickwick’s Incredible Family Adventure

A day of adventures inspired by Charles Dickens’s first novel, The Pickwick Papers. Play Victorian games, tackle the Pickwick Museum trail and finish with a goodie bag. Over three consecutive days in the summer holidays, the Family Adventure will send families back in time to discover what life was really like in Victorian England.
Dates: 17th, 18th & 19th August from 10am until 5pm. Adult: £13.50; Child: £12.50.

Oh, Poo!

Quite the invitation, this…come and join the Museum as we dig through some Victorian ‘poo’. You’ll explore the Victorian diet, learn about how the rich and the poor ate different foods and once you’ve pondered all aspects of the ‘poo’, follow the new Toilet Trail (we’re so proud) around Dickens’s home to uncover the delightfully dreadful facts about how the Victorians kept clean and went to the loo! A wonderfully weird and fun family day.
Dates: 3rd August & 24th August. 10am, 11am, 12pm, 2pm and 3pm. Adult: £15; Concession: £12; Child: £10

The Great Dickens Adventure

Charles Dickens is one of the most famous writers of all time, but while his stories are so well known, how much do we know about the man? Join us as we explore the London of Dickens’s day, uncovering the places and people who helped shape the great writer. Beginning at the Museum and ending at Fleet Street, you’ll be immersed in the past as you discover Dickens’s route to fame and find out how his early years shaped his best-loved books. Date: 20th August at 11am. £12

The Housemaid’s Tour

She’s a busy woman, but if you promise to be clean and tidy, she might let you in for a sneaky tour! Step back in time to 1838 and enjoy a tour of Charles Dickens’s London home led by his own housemaid. Hear tales of Victorian life and Dickens family gossip, with a healthy dose of dry wit. An intimate and atmospheric tour – groups are kept at no more than 15 people – showing how the Dickenses lived and worked in London.
Date: 18th September at 10am, 11am or 12 noon. £15 Adult £12 Conc £8 child

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

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Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Milton Avery: American Colourist at the Royal Academy from 15 July – 16 October 2022

Milton Avery (1885 – 1965) has long been recognised in the United States as one of the most important and influential twentieth-century American artists. Avery’s compositions, taken from daily life and which include portraits and landscapes have a major influence on artistic generations.

Avery played a vital role in the development of Abstract Expressionism through his close association with some of the younger exponents of the movement, such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Adolph Gottlieb. His work defies easy categorisation; ranging between American Impressionism and Abstract Expressionism, although he was not formally associated with either movement.

Milton Avery: American Colourist at the Royal Academy will cover the full development of Avery’s career. He was famously prolific, and this survey will feature a careful selection of 70 works, including many of his celebrated paintings from 1910 to the 1960s. The last retrospective of his work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1982 and this will be the first ever solo exhibition of Milton Avery in Europe.

The first section, Early Work, will feature work from 1910 up until the late 1930s, covering his main themes; the landscape, the city and the domestic. A number of these works have never been publicly exhibited before. The influence of the American Impressionists and Avery’s early appreciation of the landscape will be revealed. Paintings will include Blossoming, 1918 through to Fishing Village, 1939.

In the second section, Portraits, there will be paintings of his family, friends and self-portraits. Featured here will be a portrait of his friends in The Dessert, 1939 and Self-Portrait, 1941. From the early 1940s he ceased formal portraiture but retained the figure in his work.

A section entitled Innovation in Colour and Form will chart the period of innovation from the mid-1940s when Avery developed a system of flattening the compositional forms of his paintings into abstracted tonal planes. It was this development which established him as a major American colourist. Key works in this section will include two portraits of his daughter March, Seated Girl with Dog, 1944, and March in Brown, 1954, as well as Husband and Wife, 1945.

And finally in Late Work, paintings from the 1950s to the early 1960s will reveal a continuing influence of European Modernism, particularly Henri Matisse, as Avery increasingly employed non-associative colours in his compositions. There is a strong focus on the landscape and a further paring down of the detail of the subject. These works will show the extent to which Avery perfected his unique ability to balance colour and form in increasingly abstracted compositions, as seen in Black Sea, 1959, and Boathouse by the Sea, 1959.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Lucian Freud: Family Matters at the Freud Museum from 6 July 2022 to 29 January 2023

The Freud Museum honours what would have been the centenary year of British painter Lucian Freud (1922-2011), the Museum stages its first ever exhibition of the great portrait artist’s work. Lucian Freud: Family Matters will feature paintings, drawings, family photographs, books and letters, all drawn from galleries and private collections, the Museum’s archives and members of Lucian Freud’s family. Some of the items have never, or very rarely, been seen in public before.

The exhibition will run from 6 July 2022 to 29 January 2023 at the Freud Museum at 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, the final home of Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), the founder of psychoanalysis, and his daughter Anna Freud (1895-1982), the pioneering child psychoanalyst.

Lucian Freud made a major impact on British art history. Like his grandfather, Sigmund, Lucian was fascinated by the human condition and often using family and friends as his subjects, over a 60-year career.

Photograph of Ernst, Clement, Lucian and Stephen Gabriel Freud taken on holiday in Hiddensee, Germany
© Freud Museum London

Taking place in the intimate setting of the Freud family home, the exhibition will focus on works related to Lucian Freud’s childhood, family and friends. It will explore some less well-known aspects of his life, including his love of reading, and lifelong fascination with horses, as well as his relationships with the two former occupants of 20 Maresfield Gardens: his grandfather, Sigmund and his aunt, Anna.

Palm Tree by Lucian Freud (1944)
Pastel, chalk and ink on paper
© Freud Museum London

Alongside Lucian Freud’s paintings and drawings, the exhibition will include illustrated childhood letters, books he owned and book covers he designed, and his sole surviving sculpture, Three-legged Horse (1937) and early painting, Palm Tree (1944), which he gave to Anna.

Photograph of Clement, Lucian and Stephen Freud, c. 1933
© Freud Museum London

While part of a calendar of Lucian Freud centenary exhibitions across the country in 2022, the exhibition’s intimacy and family connections add a unique dimension. Public events will complement the exhibition and an accompanying outreach programme will include specially constructed exhibition visits and art workshops for families and groups in the local community.

The Freud Museum: The house at 20 Maresfield Gardens remained the Freud family home until Anna Freud’s death in 1982. Anna bequeathed the house to become a museum and the Freud Museum opened its doors to the public in 1986. The Freud Museum exists to promote the intellectual and cultural legacies of Sigmund and Anna Freud for the learning and enjoyment of all.

Information

Lucian Freud: Family Matters

The Freud Museum, 20 Maresfield Gardens, Hampstead, London NW3 5SX.

Dates: 6 July 2022 – 29 January 2023.

Opening hours: 10.30am – 5pm, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday.

For more information and tickets, visit the Freud museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Summer Exhibition 2022 at the Royal Academy from 21 June to 21 August 2022

The Royal Academy presents this year’s Summer Exhibition, which is back to its position in the London Summer scene. The 254th Summer Exhibition is a unique celebration of contemporary art and architecture, providing a vital platform and support for the artistic community. British sculptor Alison Wilding RA co-ordinates this year’s Summer Exhibition, and working with the rest of the Summer Exhibition Committee, will explore the theme of Climate.

Artists exhibiting new work this year include artistic duos Harvey & Ackroyd, The Singh Twins, and Special Olympics GB Athlete and artist Niall Guite.

Other artists invited to exhibit this year include Royal Academy Schools graduate Clara Hastrup, Dominica-born British painter Tam Joseph, sculptor Kathleen Ryan, conceptual artist Simon Starling, sculptor Gavin Turk, Brazil-based artists Denilson Baniwa and Sallisa Rosa, and art-activist Jerilea Zempel.

Newly elected Royal Academicians Michael Armitage, Peter Barber and Ryan Gander have submitting works, as well as newly elected Honorary Academician Pipilotti Rist.

Royal Academicians Rana Begum and Níall McLaughlin are working collaboratively and curate the architecture sections across two galleries, alongside artworks.

Alongside the Summer Exhibition this year will be a large-scale, immersive installation designed specifically for the Royal Academy’s Annenberg Courtyard by the renowned Spanish artist and 2020 Royal Academy Architecture Prize winner, Cristina Iglesias. Iglesias has explored themes of nature, climate, and the environment throughout her career, and the installation for the RA, Humid Labyrinth Room (with Spontaneous Landscape), has been conceived to bring the experience of intimacy and landscape to a public urban space.

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is one of the great English Art traditions, it is the world’s oldest open-submission exhibition being established in 1768 whose long line of exhibitors reads like a Who’s Who of British Art. Some of the earliest exhibitors included the likes of Reynolds, Constable and Turner, however the exhibition prides itself that it offers a snapshot of contemporary art.

Part of the fun is walking around the exhibition and spotting work by established artists, work that particularly caught my eye was Covid Bell by Grayson Perry, Sunset by Eileen Cooper, Lost Boat Party by Jock McFadyen and The Dream Emporium by Mick Rooney.

Each room offers a kaleidoscope of colour and images in a range of media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture and architectural works.

Works from all over the world are judged democratically on merit and the final selection is made during the eight-day hang in the galleries. This year the Royal Academy received over 15,000 entries, of which around 1200 works, in a range of media, will go on display. This open, inclusive and democratic show supports the artistic community and art education.

The majority of works in the Summer Exhibition are for sale, offering visitors an opportunity to purchase original work. Funds raised support the exhibiting artists, the postgraduate students studying in the RA Schools and the not-for-profit work of the Royal Academy.

This fascinating exhibition has a large number of wonderfully eclectic works on display, there is really something for everyone regardless of your particular artistic taste. The Summer Exhibition is one of the highlights of the art world and usually attracts a wide range of visitors. It also offers a rare opportunity to buy works from well-known and not so well-known artists with prices ranging from a few hundred to over a hundred thousand pounds.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Mary Gillick: modelling The Queen’s portrait at the British Museum from 2 June to 31 July 2022

In celebration of Her Majesty The Queen’s Platinum Jubilee in June, the British Museum will open a new, free display centring around female artist Mary Gillick’s (1881–1965) portrait of Elizabeth II. This was for the first ever coin featuring The Queen, designed 70 years ago in 1952 and issued in 1953. The Asahi Shimbun Display Mary Gillick: modelling The Queen’s portrait will showcase the production and reception of the coin, which was the young Queen’s first depiction on British currency.

Bust of Queen Elizabeth II r., wearing laurel wreath. Reproduced by permission of the artist © The Trustees of the British Museum

Gillick’s portrait of The Queen combined modern design with Italian Renaissance influences, building on her experience as a medal maker. Her iconic design remained in circulation on coins in the UK until the 1990s. In addition, the design has been adapted for use on British commemorative stamps since 1966 and still appears on the Maundy money given out by The Queen each Easter, indicating its continued importance.

Plaster model for the obverse of a coin. Mary Gillick, 1952. Bust of Queen Elizabeth II r., wearing laurel wreath. © The Trustees of the British Museum

Selected to design the coin from a number of invited artists, the identity of Gillick as the artist remained a secret for months. When details of the design were finally announced, the choice of a female artist in her seventies garnered great interest from the press and public. Gillick was thrust into the limelight, with photos of her posing with her design printed in newspapers all over the nation and abroad. Despite this initial interest and her long career as a sculptor, Gillick remains a much-neglected artist. As well as commemorating The Queen, this exhibition will recognise Gillick’s significant contributions to sculpture and medal design, exploring her life and work.

Struck bronze uniface medal. Mary Gillick, 1941. Bust of John Cadman, First Baron Cadman of Silverdale, r. Nude female figure kneeling l., holding up oil-lamp. © The Trustees of the British Museum

Gillick was admired by prominent figures in the art world, such as Sir Kenneth Clark.She trained at the Royal College of Art where she discovered Renaissance medals. A medal by the celebrated ‘inventor’ of the medal, the 15th century Italian painter Pisanello, will be displayed alongside her work. Gillick was inspired by what is often termed the golden age of medal design, modernising Pisanello’s style to suit 20th century Britain. Other significant commissions such as a portrait of prominent suffragette Ida Wylie, commissioned by Wylie’s lover Rachel Barrett, and depictions of an airman who shot down a Zeppelin over England during the First World War will also be on view along with preparatory drawings.

Struck bronze medal. Mary Gillick, 1945. Bust of Charles Chree, l. Nude cherub standing to front, wearing laurel wreath and holding up scroll with graph. © The Trustees of the British Museum

A highlight of the display will be items presented to the British Museum by the artist’s family in 2005, which included medals created by Gillick from the 1910s to the 1950s, a set of large-scale plaster models of her portrait of The Queen, and documents relating to the new coins. Drawings and photographs loaned from the Henry Moore Institute will demonstrate the creative process in full.

This display is part of the celebrations marking Her Majesty The Queen Elizabeth II’s Platinum Jubilee. On Saturday 11 June the Museum is holding The Platinum Jubilee Party with family friendly activities on offer. Visitors will have the chance to create their own Mary Gillick style portrait of The Queen in a workshop run by artist David Allsop. Individual portraits taken with an onsite photobooth will be decorated and made into an enormous collaborative card that will be sent to the Royal Household. Other activities include making decorative crowns with the independent jewellery brand Tatty Devine and a performance by London-based brass band No Limit Street Band.

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Great Exhibition Road Festival 2022 – 18 to 19 June 2022

On the weekend of 18-19 June, Exhibition Road, the world-famous home of some of the UK’s greatest museums and centres of innovation, will become a vibrant festival, celebrating the ideas, people and communities that are changing our world. The Great Exhibition Road Festival will be full of inspirational events for all ages and opportunities to hear from and take part in activities with some of the world’s great, innovative minds.

Trailblazers are at the heart of the festival, from the Victorian innovators of the Great Exhibition in 1851, to the people changing their communities today and those shaping our future with their research. Visitors of all ages will be welcome to discover the power of ideas, celebrate curiosity, and reimagine a new world.

Some Highlights

The Hands-On Families Zone is packed with games, stories, crafts, quizzes, demos and experiments. Alongside scientists, artists and engineers, you can build rockets, extract DNA,transform transport, discover how animals adapt to climate change, how morse code can help badgers or how bacteria can turn plastic waste into new materials.

The Curiosity Zone with games, experiments, arts and crafts activities revealing the lights that diagnose diseases, 3D printed bones, paper marbling, fluid dynamics and DNA origami.

The Smart Machines zone invites you to meet the latest Artificial Intelligence systems, digital decision makers, aerial robots and flying drones.

Medical Marvels showcases new medical research, inviting you to take a live, musical journey through the brain, discover how gene therapy is fighting diseases, visit the chemist of the future and see how disease modelling is fighting outbreaks across the world.

The Adult Zone, where you can sharpen your fashion upcycling skills, take in a cloud demo or grab a drink from the bar and relax in the garden – an oasis for adults in the middle of a busy festival.

At the Neurodiversity Zone, you can learn about the incredible creativity of neurodiverse artists and innovators, draw your own dyslexia, develop your own comic or science hero, make tinted glasses out of recycled materials, redesign the egg, or try knit bombing. Relax in a low sensory environment designed for tranquillity or enjoy art and poetry by neurodiverse creators.

The Future Design Zone reveals the innovations happening across Imperial College London. Visitors will design chairs with design engineers, hear 3D sounds in the audio lab and try out a full-size mock-up of an autonomous vehicle, leaving with a virtual experience of future city centre journeys.

The Climate Friendly Pop-Up Kitchen will serve delicious, healthy, affordable and sustainable food samples made from plant-based and largely local, seasonal ingredients prepared by professional chefs. Get a taste of sustainability, pick up recipe cards and get some top tips for reducing the carbon footprint of your meals.

The Amazing Molecular Science Show will give families the chance to explore the incredible world of molecules in a live interactive family-friendly show

Augmented Reality and the future of gaming, looking at the creation of new otherworldly sports to be played in real world arenas and playing fields.

The search for ancient life on Mars – Red planet scientists report on the latest findings fromNASA’s Perseverance Rover and its ground-breaking search for evidence of possible Martian life

Suppressed music – opera singer Peter Brathwaite discusses bringing to the stage music banned by fascists and voices oppressed by the slave trade.

The music label run from prison – join InHouse Records, the UK’s first record label to be launched in prison, to hear about breaking the reoffending cycle through music.

The future of surgery. Join Lord Ara Darzi, Professor of Surgery and co-director of the Institute of Global Health Innovation, and members of the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery at Imperial College London, for an exploration on how the field of surgery has evolved and how engineers and doctors are developing the next generation of surgical technologies, including imaging techniques, sensor technology, surgical robots and augmented reality.

Why we infected healthy people with COVID-19. During the height of the pandemic, researchers from Imperial infected 36 healthy people with COVID-19. Find out why, how they made it safe, and what they learnt.

Journey through the cosmos with storyteller Helen Tozer and cosmologist Claudia de Rham to discover how scientists use rainbows and gravitational waves to see and hear the universe.

‘Kaleidoscopic Minds’, an immense installation by creative pioneer, local artist Azarra Amoy, originally co-curated with Kensington + Chelsea Art Week, will illustrate the contributions of South Kensington’s community of neurodiverse colleagues to innovation and celebrate Exhibition Road as one of the world’s most exciting places to live, work, study and visit.

Festival Information

The Great Exhibition Road Festival 2022 – Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ
18 to 19 June 2022
Admission prices: Everything is free but some events need to be booked.

For more information and tickets, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Elizabeth Line is Open, London’s new railway lines for the 21st century.

London’s Underground system is one of the oldest and most comprehensive in the world, however the new Elizabeth Line is one of the biggest change in London infrastructure in a century. Three-and-a-half years late and at least £4bn over-budget, the Elizabeth line has finally opened. When it’s fully operational, the new rail line, will serve up to 200 million passengers each year. The line is expected to increase London’s train capacity by 10%.

The project was originally known as Crossrail has built a 73-mile (118km) railway line all across south-east England. It runs from Essex in the east to Berkshire in the west, running underground through central London.

There are two western branches, which terminate at Reading and Heathrow Airport, and two eastern branches, ending at Shenfield in Essex and Abbey Wood in south-east London.

Ten new stations have been built for the central London section, which connect Paddington, Bond Street, Liverpool St and Canary Wharf.

The line was first conceived in the 1980s, however work on the project did not start until 2009 and 10,000 workers have been employed on the 13-year project.

Visitors to London will notice that the trains are bigger, carrying up to 1,500 passengers – significantly more than a London Underground train.

At the moment, a full service is not available yet. Initially, trains will run six days a week, every five minutes from 06:30 to 23:00 with no Sunday service. The line will operate in three parts – from Abbey Wood to Paddington, from Heathrow and Reading to Paddington, and Shenfield to Liverpool Street. Bond Street station in central London will not open until later this year, due to problems during construction. From the autumn, trains from Heathrow will no longer terminate at Paddington, and will continue on through the central section of the line. Passengers won’t be able to travel directly from one end of the line to the other until May 2023.

The new line will mean significant shorter times for many travellers. Elizabeth line fares are identical to those on London Underground. Services currently operating as TfL Rail will remain unchanged although there will be a £7.20 premium on journeys to and from Heathrow airport.

Peak single journeys to Heathrow from central London (weekdays between 06:30-09:30 and 16:00-19:00) will cost £12.70 and be £2 cheaper at other times. In comparison, peak and off-peak Tube fares are currently £5.50 and £3.50 respectively, while the Heathrow Express costs £25.

Older person’s freedom passes allowing free travel, including to Heathrow and Reading, will be accepted after 09:00 on weekdays and at weekends.

The final cost of Crossrail is estimated to be £19bn, but it will no doubt be popular for many visitors and Londoners.

For more information and tickets, visit the Elizabeth Line website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Feminine power: the divine to the demonic at the British Museum from 19 May to 25 September 2022

The British Museum presents the first major exhibition to explore female spiritual beings in world belief and mythological traditions around the globe.

This exhibition brings together ancient sculpture, sacred artefacts and contemporary art from six continents to explore the diversity of ways in which femininity has been perceived across the globe, from the ancient world to today.

It explores the embodiment of feminine power in deities, goddesses, demons, saints and other spiritual beings, associated with diverse areas of human experience, from wisdom, passion and nature, to war, mercy and justice.

Objects from cultures across the globe are displayed together for the first time including painted scrolls from Tibet, Roman sculpture, intricate personal amulets from Egypt, Japanese prints and Indian relief carvings alongside contemporary sculptures.

The exhibition includes over 70 unique objects, drawn from the British Museum’s world-class collection complimented by rare loans.

For the first time, the British Museum has invited special guest contributors to respond to the themes in the exhibition, sharing their personal and professional viewpoints. The video and audio thought-pieces addressing each section will encourage discussion around the universal themes of the show. The contributions conclude the exhibition alongside an area for visitors to share their responses as part
of the conversation.

The special guest contributors include: Dr Leyla Hussein, psychotherapist and award-winning international campaigner against violence against women will reflect on Forces of Nature; Professor Mary Beard, classicist, author and broadcaster will speak to Passion and Desire; award-winning writer and presenter of the podcast How To Fail, Elizabeth Day, will explore Magic and Malice; former British Army Major and human rights lawyer, Rabia Siddique, will share her thoughts on Justice and Defence; and Deborah Frances-White, the writer and comedian best known for her podcast The Guilty Feminist, will explore the theme of Compassion and Salvation.

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a newly acquired icon of the Hindu goddess Kali by Bengali artist, Kaushik Ghosh, the first contemporary 3D representation of Kali in the British Museum collection. Kali is one of the most prominent and widely venerated goddesses in India who is loved and feared for her formidable power as a goddess of destruction and salvation, who transcends time and death.

Since the late first millennium AD, Lilith has been known within Jewish demonology as the first wife of Adam and the consort of Satan. Her origins are thought to lie in Mesopotamia. The exhibition includes a ceramic incantation bowl from 500-800 AD Iraq, featuring a rare early image of Lilith in female form.

On loan from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is the sculpture, Lilith (1994), by American artist Kiki Smith. Smith’s sculpture is cast from the body of a real woman, her eyes of blue glass directly confront the viewer as she crouches on all fours against the wall.

This fascinating exhibition explores how feminine power has played a vital role in world belief and mythology. This role has led to a number of representations that often shape cultural attitudes towards women and gender identity. Modern artists and writers are beginning to use these representations to challenge some of these stereotypes and look at more balanced views of women in many different societies.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

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