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Portobello Road Street Food

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The Portobello Market and the surrounding area offers a great variety of fresh produce, essential and specialist ingredients and hot food options. The Westway and Golborne Road are hotspots for Street food stalls but there are a number of eateries dotted throughout the area.

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Following the tradition of many London markets, there are plenty of choice of fresh fruit and vegetables,

Over the weekend, there are many specialist food stalls Near Talbot Road, The Bread Stall has bread, cakes and pastries with more than 20 different kinds of bread. Une Normande a Londres outside the Electric Cinema offers French cheese, sausage and terrine. Vito has the finest olive oils and balsamic vinegars, and at The Olive Bar you can sample olives, feta and Mediterranean hot food .

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Popina has all-vegetarian baked goods from fruit tarts to filo parcels, The Mushroom Man provides a wide selection of funghi and Piper’s Fresh Fish has fish and seafood.

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Street food from all over the world is available on market days including a number of falafel stalls churros, bratwurst, paella , crepes and curry. Throughout the market you will find North African and Caribbean street food , including an award-winning Moroccan soup stand.

If you would like further information, visit the Portobello Road Market website here

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Review : Portobello Road Market

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The Portobello Road market with over 1,000 dealers selling all kinds of items is one of the largest markets in London and since the late 20th century had attracted a large number of visitors from London and overseas.

The market is situated in the trendy London district of Notting Hill and is surrounded by a large number of pubs, cafes and restaurants.

The area takes it name from the Porto Bello Farm which was built-in the area which was named after the town of Porto Bello in Panama, captured by the British from the Spanish in the 18th century. For much of the 18th and 19th century, Portobello Road was a country lane in a rural area.

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Gradually in the 19th century, residential development began to take place in the Portobello Road area, with a number of terraces and crescents built for the increasing numbers of wealthy people attracted to the district.

Up until the 1940s, Portobello Road market was similar to many other London markets and mainly sold food and other essential items. However after the war, traders selling antiques and bric-a-brac and antiques began to sell their wares and gradually Portobello Road Market became known as a place to pick up antiques.

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In the later half of the 20th century, Portobello Road was transformed from run-down district to being to one of most affluent, fashionable and desirable areas to live in the capital. The new residents spending power attracted young fashion designers who began to trade at the market selling designer and vintage clothing.

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Each day attracts different traders, Saturday is the busiest day and attracts large crowds. In the market is a large number of street food stands and plenty of live music along the trail of the market.

Saturday- main day

Full street market plus;

Antiques Arcades open

Westbourne Grove – antiques stalls between Portobello Road and Kensington Park Road

Portobello Green – more new fashion and less vintage than Friday

The market is packed with stalls from Westbourne Grove all the way up to and along Golborne Road, and across under the Westway out to Ladbroke Grove.

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Friday – second busiest day

Southern Portobello Road – antiques

Middle of the market – food, new fashion, accessories, household goods

Portobello Green, North Portobello – vintage clothing & accessories, collectables, bric-a-brac

Golborne Road – bric-a-brac, furniture, food

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Sunday

Portobello Green has a market selling mostly vintage clothing and bric-a-brac -no street market in Portobello or Golborne Roads.

Most cafes/shops are open + some forecourt traders at the southern end of Portobello Road.

Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday

Portobello Road between Elgin Crescent and the Westway – fruit and veg, household goods, a few clothing stalls, sometimes casual stalls of vintage clothing or bric-a-brac

Golborne Road – fruit and veg, hot food

Thursday

Portobello market and Golborne market is half-day on Thursdays, with stalls closing by 1pm.

Travel

There’s a choice of two underground stations: Ladbroke Grove (Hammersmith & City Lines) or Notting Hill Gate, which is on the Central, Circle and District lines.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : An Appetite for Murder by Linda Stratmann

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An Appetite for Murder by Linda Stratmann

The Frances Doughty Mysteries are a series of whodunits written by Linda Stratmann, set in Victorian Bayswater featuring a young female detective.

Frances used to help her father and brother run a chemists shop in Westbourne Grove until their deaths, however with her assistant Sarah she has forged a new career as a detective.

Considered a bit of a novelty in Victorian Bayswater, Frances finds support from the ladies of the Bayswater Women’s Suffrage Society, but opposition from the local police detective Inspector Sharrock.

An Appetite for Murder is the fourth Frances Doughty mystery and includes an interesting mix of Diet Doctors, Suffragettes and shady businessmen.

The novel is based in the respectable streets of Bayswater in 1881, the sudden death of overweight Thomas Whibley  sets off a heated debate between rival diet doctors. The debate descends into anonymous  and libellous accusations and Frances Doughty’s services are required to unmask the mysterious writers of these libellous letters known as “Sanitas” and “Bainiardus”.

Before she can delve into this mystery, our young lady detective is visited by a former  colleague of Mr Whibley, a Horace Sweetman who has just been released from prison after serving fourteen years for a crime he claims he did not commit and is seeking his estranged family.

At the end of the visit, the mystery deepens when the police arrive to arrest Sweetman for the murder of his wife.

The Frances Doughty mysteries in general and  this novel in particular has populated Victorian Bayswater with a series of almost Dickensian figures, however the writer’s real strength is make these characters rounded and credible.

Linda Stratmann has written several books about real life crimes  and this probably explains her ability to examine with great insight the seedy undercurrents of Victorian Society.

But the writers finest achievement is the characters of Frances Doughty and her assistant Sarah whose intelligence and sometimes brawn are bought into play time and time again.  What is particularly impressive is we are left in no doubt that Frances and Sarah are operating in a Man’s world and have to face the everyday prejudices associated with that.

It is significant that Frances keeps her calm in many dangerous situations but loses her cool when propositioned by a so called respectable gentleman.

Bayswater is an unusual and interesting choice to base the novels, although we probably see the area now as an area full of hotels and perhaps transient population, in Victorian London it was considered quite a wealthy area with good quality housing and plenty of quality shops.

Linda Stratmann’s attention to historic details allows you to get a real feel of this environment of the perhaps not “rich” but “comfortably off.” Of course this is the very environment in which white collar crime thrives behind the wall of  so called respectability . And it is this type of crime which is often difficult to detect as Frances quickly finds out first impressions can be deceptive.

This book will appeal to readers who like their mysteries based in a Victorian London full of interesting well drawn characters and who like to see a complex plot unravel slowly to an unpredictable finish.

 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

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