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Exhibition Review – Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams at the Victoria and Albert Museum from 2nd February to 14th July 2019

The V&A presents the largest and most comprehensive exhibition ever staged in the UK on the House of Dior and the museum’s biggest fashion exhibition since Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015. Spanning 1947 to the present day, the exhibition entitled Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will trace the history and impact of one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him.

Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve, organised by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, the exhibition has been reimagined for the V&A. A brand-new section explores the designer’s fascination with British culture. Dior admired the grandeur of the great houses and gardens of Britain, as well as British-designed ocean liners, including the Queen Mary.

The exhibition is spread across 11 sections and showcases the skill and craftsmanship of those associated with the House of Dior. The exhibition presents over 500 objects with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, perfume, make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions.

The first section looks explores Christian Dior’s life from his early career as a gallery owner and the founding of the House of Dior in 1946.

The New Look focuses on Dior’s famed Bar Suit from his ground-breaking first collection in 1947.

The Dior Line showcases ten defining looks made between 1947 and 1957 during Christian Dior’s tenure at the House.

Dior in Britain considers Dior’s love of England and how he held his early Dior fashion shows in country houses and grand hotels around Britain.

Historicism examines the influence of historic dress and decorative arts in the House of Dior’s designs from 1947 to today, Dior had a love of the 18th century, and the Belle Époque fashions.

Travels explores how travel and different countries and cultures have inspired the various designers at the House of Dior.

The Garden highlights the importance of flowers and gardens as a source of inspiration to the House from garments to perfume.

Designers for Dior spotlights the work of the subsequent six key artistic directors since Christian Dior’s death in 1957. Featuring the designs of Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri.

The Ateliers showcases toiles from the Dior Ateliers in a unusual ‘cabinet of curiosity’ installation.

Diorama examines the wide range of the House of Dior, from accessories including costume jewellery, hats, shoes and bags.

The Ballroom celebrates the fantasy of the Ball and showcases 70 years of formal evening wear.

This remarkable, comprehensive  exhibition with over 500 objects including over 200 rare Haute Couture garments illustrates how Christian Dior transformed the face of fashion after the war with his New Look and how the House of Christian Dior as been at the forefront of fashion ever since. Dior’s vision included garments, accessories and fragrances, he launched Miss Dior, his first fragrance in 1947. Dior was one of the early pioneers of fashion as a global brand building a luxury fashion empire  built on great design and skills and talent of the Haute Couture ateliers associated with the brand.

The exhibition Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams runs from 2 February – 14 July 2019.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Videogames: Design/ Play/ Disrupt at the Victoria and Albert Museum – 8th September 2018 to 24th February 2019


Arcade Backpack, UCLA Games Lab (Photo by Robin Baumgarten)

The V&A explores the world of videogames with an exhibition entitled Videogames: Design/ Play/ Disrupt. In one of the first exhibitions of its kind,  it will consider how contemporary designers, players and critics are pushing boundaries in playful and radical new ways. The exhibition will take visitors into the creative process of developing games such as The Last of Us to Kentucky Route Zero, including original prototypes, early character designs and notebooks, will be shown alongside cultural inspiration from a Magritte painting to a viral cat video.

Winterfell, Westeroscraft. © Minecraft

From blockbuster titles produced by leading studios such as Splatoon from Nintendo, to independents such as Journey by thatgamecompany, the exhibition will show the craft and skill of creating ground-breaking videogame design. These examples will be presented alongside large-scale immersive multimedia and interactive installations from Minecraft to League of Legends and investigations of the social and political issues in the field, offering an insight into the design process, community and culture of videogames.

League of Legends, Worlds 2017. Riot Games.

The exhibition will explore videogame design since the mid-2000s, when major technological advancements, such as increased access to broadband, social media and newly available means of making, transformed the way games are designed, discussed and played. With at least 2.2 billion players worldwide, the reach and range of gaming will be examined within creative online player communities who modify games and create fan art; spectators and competitive performers at large scale esports stadium events and surprising spaces of the niche DIY arcade scene.

No Man’s Sky – ™/© 2016 Hello Games Ltd. Developed by Hello Games Ltd. All rights reserved

The exhibition celebrates the imagination and collaborative creativity shown by videogames players in real and virtual communities, transcending the role of the designer to democratise design on a vast scale. The double-height exhibition space in this section will feature a dramatic and immersive installation that explores the role of the player as co-creator. This will show the astonishing feats of engineering and construction undertaken in Minecraft from the recreation of the continent of Westeros in Game of Thrones to the mass spectacle of esports tournaments such as League of Legends World Championships. There will be examples of fan art and cosplay created by enthusiasts who interpret the medium in their own style and create costumes and accessories to represent themselves, or even their pets as characters.

The V&A actively collects digital design and is expanding its collection and explores how videogames as digital objects can be preserved and exhibited.

Videogames: Design/ Play/ Disrupt will run from 8 September 2018 – 24 February 2019 at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Victoria and Albert Museum announces largest ever Christian Dior exhibition in the UK from 2nd February to 14th July 2019


Yves Saint Laurent in front of Christian Dior London, 11th November 1958. © Popperfoto, Getty Images

In February 2019, the V&A will open the largest and most comprehensive exhibition ever staged in the UK on the House of Dior – the museum’s biggest fashion exhibition since Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015.

Spanning 1947 to the present day, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will trace the history and impact of one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him, to explore the enduring influence of the fashion house.

Écarlate afternoon dress, Autumn-Winter 1955 Haute Couture collection, Y line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve, organised by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, the exhibition will be reimagined for the V&A. A brand-new section will, for the first time, explore the designer’s fascination with British culture. Dior admired the grandeur of the great houses and gardens of Britain, as well as British-designed ocean liners, including the Queen Mary. He also had a preference for Savile Row suits. In 1947, he hosted his first UK fashion show at London’s Savoy Hotel, and in 1952 established Christian Dior London. This exhibition will investigate Dior’s creative collaborations with influential British manufacturers, and his most notable British clients, from author Nancy Mitford to ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn.

A highlight will be the Christian Dior dress worn by Princess Margaret for her 21st birthday celebrations, generously on loan from the Museum of London. It will also bring to life Dior’s spectacular fashion shows staged in the UK’s most luxurious stately homes, including Blenheim Palace in 1954.

Pérou short evening dress, Autumn-Winter 1954 Haute Couture collection, H line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Gift of Cecil Beaton. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Drawn from the extensive Dior Archives, the exhibition will also showcase highlights from the V&A’s world-class Couture collections, including the iconic Bar Suit, gifted to the museum by the House of Dior in 1960. The exhibition will present over 500 objects, with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, perfume, make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions.

The exhibition will highlight Dior’s vision of femininity, encompassing garments, accessories and fragrances. Flowers are emblematic of the Couture House and have inspired silhouettes, embroidery and prints but also the launch of Miss Dior in 1947, the first fragrance created alongside the very first show.

From horticulture to global travel and 18th century decorative arts, the show will reveal the sources of inspiration that defined the House of Dior’s aesthetic. From the daring designs of Yves Saint Laurent to the rational style of Marc Bohan, the flamboyance of Gianfranco Ferré, the exuberance of John Galliano, the minimalism of Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri’s feminist vision of fashion, the exhibition will show how each successive artistic director has stayed true to Dior’s vision of Haute Couture, while bringing their own creative sensibilities to the House.

The exhibition Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams runs from 2 February – 14 July 2019. Tickets will go on sale in Autumn 2018.

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Frida Kahlo : Making Her Self Up at the Victoria and Albert Museum from 16th June to 4th November 2018

The V&A presents an exhibition that explores the life and times of Frida Kahlo, the exhibition entitled Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up is the first exhibition outside of Mexico to display her clothes and intimate possessions, reuniting them with key self-portraits and photographs to offer a comprehensive perspective on her life story.

The V&A, working in close collaboration with Museo Frida Kahlo displays more than 200 objects from the Blue House where Kahlo lived for most of her life. Kahlo’s personal items including outfits, letters, jewellery, cosmetics, medicines and medical corsets were discovered in 2004, 50 years after being sealed in the Blue House by her husband Diego Rivera, the Mexican muralist, following her death in 1954.

The beginning of the exhibition is centred around Kahlo’s early life at the Blue House, located in Coyoacán, on the outskirts of Mexico City. Kahlo’s father Guillermo Kahlo was a photographer and a number of his photographs are included in the exhibition. The section also includes early paintings and photographs of Kahlo and her husband Diego Rivera and with some of their influential circle of friends including Communist leader Leon Trotsky who features in a rare film with the couple.

Kahlo suffered from a series of illnesses and injuries throughout her life starting from contracting polio when she was a young child to a near-fatal bus crash at the age of 18, which led her to being bed-bound and immobilised for protracted periods of time. It was at this time that she began to create a series of self portraits that often addressed her physical and mental condition at the time.

The exhibition features a number of medical and orthopaedic items that was discovered when the Blue House objects were found in 2004. Kahlo possessed many supportive bodices and spine back braces which sometimes were covered with religious and communist symbolism. Paintings from this time often included tragic imagery relating to her miscarriages.

Following the Mexican Revolution, Kahlo began to show her cultural and national pride by using the art and traditions of indigenous people of the country in her work. On one of the walls, there is number of ex votos, from Kahlo and Rivera’s collection. These small votive paintings of popular art, made mainly in tin, offered to a saint or to a divinity in gratitude for the fulfillment of a miracle.

Other people began to explore some of the attractions of Mexico in the 1920s, foreign artists, writers, photographers and documentary film makers began to document Mexico and often gravitated to Kahlo and Rivera who were making a name for themselves inside and outside of Mexico. The exhibition features a number of photographs from this period by Edward Weston, Tina Modotti and Nickolas Muray.

Kahlo and Rivera separated in 1935 and Kahlo’s work began to be noticed by American galleries leading to a 1938 solo exhibition in New York. Kahlo had an exhibition in Paris in 1939 organised by surrealists Andre Breton and Marcel Duchamp, one of the paintings entitled The Frame was bought the Louvre which was their first acquisition by a 20th century Mexican artist.

The final room in the exhibition is devoted to the many garments from Kahlo’s collection including rebozos, a traditional Mexican shawl, huipiles, an embroidered square-cut top, enaguas and holanes, long skirts with flounces, and jewellery ranging from pre-Columbian jade beads to modern silverwork. One of the highlights is a resplandor, a lace headdress worn by the women of the matriarchal society from the Isthmus of Tehuantepec region in Southern Mexico, paired with a self-portrait of Kahlo wearing it.

This intriguing and unusual exhibition illustrates many aspects of the complex life of Frida Kahlo. Her long-standing health problems influenced much of her early art which often included a retreat in mythical imagery to show some of the pain she was enduring. However there was another side to Kahlo’s personality in which she became something of a ‘celebrity’ and enjoyed life to the full and led her to create an identity that seems to resonate with many people.

In the past 20 or more years, Frida Kahlo has become an ‘icon’ for many groups. A visit to this exhibition will provide some evidence why she is considered something of a countercultural and feminist symbol.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review: The Future Starts Here at the Victoria and Albert Museum – 12th May to 4th November 2018

The V&A explores some of the ways that design is shaping the future in the major exhibition entitled The Future Starts Here. Rather than speculating from science fiction, the exhibition concentrates on science fact by bringing together ground-breaking technologies and designs currently in development in studios and laboratories around the world.

Using the latest international research and drawing on a range of companies, universities, practitioners and advisors, the V&A attempts to paint a picture of future developments. To illustrate this future, the exhibition focuses on more than 100 objects, many of which have never been on public display.  The exhibition explores some of the potential impact these objects may have on the body, the home, politics, cities, and the planet and raises a number of ethical and speculative questions and looks at some of the possible consequences.

One of the larger objects in the exhibition is the Facebook’s Aquila aircraft, part of a solar-powered high-altitude platform station (HAPS) system which is part of Facebook’s efforts to bring affordable connectivity to unconnected regions around the world. Nearby is Jalila Essaidi’s Living Network project, which imagines a future of the internet as a world wide web of trees.

The exhibition is arranged around four main themes that increase in scale: Self, Public, Planetary and Afterlife. The exhibition poses questions such as Are We Human? And we’re all connected but do we feel lonely? this illustrates the general idea that with the advent of smart devices, notions of privacy are changing. However the sharing of our through social media raises questions like increased digital connectivity can lead to solitariness and loneliness in our real lives.

Perhaps more positive is the way that technology is being used to enable some people to undertake a variety of tasks. On display is some adaptations that were created for a 70-year-old quadruple amputee to undertake everyday tasks.  

The next section allows visitors to evaluate if democracy still works with projects showing new strategies for collective decision-making and improving public services. Objects in this section include a full scale model of Luchtsingel, a crowdfunded pedestrian bridge in Rotterdam and the ‘Super Citizen’ suit belonging to Antanas Mockus, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia.

Urban areas face some of the greatest challenges and the exhibition features Foster + Partners’ model of their 6 million m² Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, the world’s first carbon-neutral, zero-waste city, which is shown alongside maquettes of Kuehn Malvezzi’s House of One in Berlin, a three-faith house of worship.  

 

Many designers are responding to planetary issues with a number of possible solutions, projects like Tomás Saraceno’s Aerocene Explorer, a solar-powered, balloon-like sculpture uses open-source techniques to collect atmospheric data and Cesar Jung Harada’s Protei which is an un-manned and un-polluting ship that detects and cleans up oil spills.  

The final part of the exhibition explores some of the initiatives that will safeguard some of the world’s natural resources. Highlights include an architectural model of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, nicknamed the “Doomsday Vault”, which contains crates of seeds from all over the world, to protect them from natural and man-made disasters.

Also on display is an example of the external 5D data storage developed at the University of Southampton capable of surviving for billions of years.  These small glass discs are already being used to store major documents from human history, such as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and The Magna Carta. Even questions of immortality are considered with the idea of Cryonics where people can be stored in liquid nitrogen after death, with a view to being brought back to life in the future.

 This unusual and fascinating exhibition asks some big questions and looks at some objects that are already providing some possible solutions to some of our pressing concerns. Predicting the future is a notoriously difficult pursuit due to the fact that there are unpredictable and unintended consequences that often changes the paths of development. However it is always useful to consider the future we would like to see and find ways of achieving those goals.

The Future Starts Here will run from 12 May to 4 November 2018 in the Sainsbury Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review : Fashioned from Nature at the Victoria and Albert Museum – 21st April 2018 to 27th Jan 2019

The Victoria and Albert Museum presents a major exhibition that explores the often complex relationship between fashion and the natural world since 1600. The story of how fashionable dress has constantly drawn on the beauty of nature is told through over 300 objects.

The exhibition provides plenty of evidence that the natural world has always provided inspiration for fashion. One of the earliest pieces in the exhibition, a women’s jacket from the early 1600s, is embroidered with designs of pea-shoots and flowers. There is 1780s man’s waistcoat, expertly embroidered with a pattern of Macacque monkeys. More recently there is a Gucci’s contemporary bag decorated with stag beetle motifs,  a 2016 Giles Deacon haute-couture dress features a pattern of bird’s eggs and gowns from Jean Paul Gaultier (1997) and Busvine (1933-4) both feature leopard print.

Few would question, the natural world as inspiration, however including the creatures themselves is slightly different. The exhibition includes a an 1875 pair of earrings formed from the heads of two real Honeycreeper birds and a 1860s muslin dress decorated with the iridescent green wing cases of hundreds of jewel beetles. This was the tip of the iceberg, birds, feathers, furs, whalebone and turtle shells are just a few of the materials that were taken directly from nature.

Raw materials played an important part in the global trade of the 17th and 18th centuries especially silk, flax, wool and cotton. The exhibition includes an 18th court dress that includes a variety of materials from all over the world.  At various times, whole nations depended on the revenue from raw materials and international trade grew with the import of precious materials to satisfy the demand for high quality products.

Although the introduction of man-made materials enabled fashionable dress to be available to the masses, the textile industry contributed greatly to the problems of air and water pollution.

Moving upstairs in the exhibition, the emphasis is more on the 20th and 21st centuries and shows a  display of posters, slogan clothes and artworks that illustrate the protest movements that have helped draw attention to some of the harmful side of fashion. The exhibition features the outfit worn by Vivienne Westwood whilst protesting against climate change. A man’s outfit from Katharine Hamnett’s 1989 ‘Clean Up or Die’ collection is on show alongside posters from Fashion Revolution, a collective aiming to change the way clothes are sourced, produced and consumed.

Menswear and womenswear from Stella McCartney, is displayed alongside a upcycled dress by Christopher Raeburn. The dress made from recycled plastic bottles worn by actor Emma Watson with a Calvin Klein look is also featured

The exhibition also explores some of the solutions created to reduce fashion’s impact on the environment.  These include a dress grown from plant roots by the artist Diana Scherer, who uses seed, soil and water to train root systems into textile-like material, a bio-luminescent genetically-engineered silk dress created by Sputniko! and a tunic and trousers made from synthetic spider silk from Bolt Threads x Stella McCartney. Vegea use grape waste from the wine industry to form a leather-substitute and their Grape gown is on show, as is a Ferragamo ensemble made from ‘Orange Fiber’ derived from waste from the Italian citrus industry and an H&M Conscious dress made from recycled shoreline plastic.

This thought-provoking exhibition provides evidence that fashion has been inspired by nature but has also exploited nature in often cruel and bizarre ways. The exhibition illustrates how this  complex relationship has developed over the past 400 years and how the search for raw materials have also impacted on global trade with often serious consequences on producers and suppliers. Part of the exhibition considers how many aspects of this legacy has been challenged in recent years with a series of contemporary designers looking to provide creative and sustainable popular fashion.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review – Ocean Liners: Speed and Style at the Victoria and Albert Museum from 3rd February to 17th June 2018

The Victoria and Albert Museum re-imagines the golden age of ocean travel with their major new exhibition entitled Ocean Liners: Speed & Style.  It is the first ever exhibition to explore the design and cultural impact of the ocean liner on an international scale and features sections on ship design, engineering, architecture and interiors to the fashion and lifestyle aboard.

Ocean Liners: Speed & Style introduces over 250 objects, including paintings, sculpture, and ship models, alongside objects from shipyards, wall panels, furniture, fashion, textiles, photographs, posters and film. It will display objects never-before-seen in Europe, and reunite objects not seen together since on-board these iconic vessels.  

The exhibition begins by looking at some of the interiors of some of the world’s most luxurious liners from the Beaux-Arts interiors of Kronprinz Wilhelm, Titanic and Olympic, to the floating Art Deco palaces of Queen Mary and Normandie, and the Modernism of SS United States and QE2.

The idea of luxurious ocean liners began to some extent from the ill-fated Brunel’s steamship, the Great Eastern of 1859, however it was not until the early 20th Century that shipping companies began to sell on-board travel on the liners as an enjoyable experience in itself.

There was also an element of international rivalry with various nations using the liners as a showcase for marine technology and cultural expression. Part of the exhibition features some of the state of the art engineering behind the liners and some of the skills of the workers who built the ships. One of the highlights is Stanley Spencer’s painting ‘The Riveters’ from the 1941 series Shipbuilding on the Clyde.

The exhibition reveals some of the leading artists and designers who contributed to the interior design of the ships, such as William De Morgan, Richard Riemerschmid, Jean Dunand, Edward Bawden and Edward Ardizzone.

The often formal nature of travel in the areas on the ships catering for wealthy passengers led to some of the great couturiers designing fashions for passengers to wear whilst enjoying ocean travel. Famous passengers were often used to promote their designs, the exhibition features a Christian Dior suit worn by Marlene Dietrich as she arrived in New York aboard the Queen Mary in 1950, and a Lucien Lelong couture gown worn for the maiden voyage of Normandie in 1935.

The exhibition will also showcases Jeanne Lanvin’s ‘Salambo’ dress, the dress belonged to Emilie Grigsby, a wealthy American who regularly travelled between the UK and New York aboard the liners throughout the 1910s and 1920s. The Duke of Windsor’s 1940s Goyard luggage is also featured, on display in Europe for the first time since leaving the Windsor Estate.

One of the ironies of ocean liner travel is that it is the ships that sank that are the most famous, the exhibition features a precious Cartier tiara recovered from the sinking Lusitania in 1915 and a panel fragment from the Titanic’s first class lounge, returning to the UK for the first time since its doomed maiden voyage in 1912. At the end of the exhibition, clips from Ronald Neame’s The Poseidon Adventure (1972) and James Cameron’s Titanic (1997), remind us of our fascination with these ‘floating palaces’.

This attractive, enjoyable and fascinating exhibition explores the relatively short ‘golden age’ of luxury ocean travel. In many ways, the exhibition illustrates how shipping companies created the impression that the often long periods on board could be enjoyed rather than just endured. This was often achieved by creating a ‘fantasy’ of an ordered society where everyone knew their place, the irony of course is that ‘ordered’ society on land was under attack for a variety of reasons. 

Despite wars and depression in the early part of the 20th century, seemingly no expense was spared to provide sumptuous interiors and leisure activities that would appeal to the wealthy or the aspiring middle classes.

The growth of the commercial airlines after the Second World War gradually led to the end of the ‘golden age’ of luxury ocean travel but the nostalgia and romance for the period is still strong. This exhibition gives a taste of the period and how artists contributed to and were inspired by the ‘age of the luxury ocean liners.’

Video Review available here

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here