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A Short Guide to The Royal Academy of Arts

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The Royal Academy of Arts (RA) is one of the major art institutions in London and is based at Burlington House in Piccadilly. Unlike many other art institutions, The RA is an independent, privately funded institution led by artists. Whose mission is to promote not just the appreciation and understanding of art, but also its practice.

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The RA has an illustrious history being formed with the support of King George III, the idea was to form a society for promoting the Arts of Design. Although there were other artist societies, they generally just put on exhibitions. The RA wanted to become Britain’s first art school and provide a space to put on exhibitions that would advertise the talents of its members.

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Among the founder members were acclaimed painters Joshua Reynolds, Thomas Gainsborough and Benjamin West. The R A was based first in a small gallery in Pall Mall before moving into the old then new Somerset House in 1780. The Academy then moved to the New National Gallery in 1837 before in 1868 locating in its present home in Burlington House in Piccadilly. Artists that have studied at the RA school have included J. M. W. Turner, William Blake, Thomas Rowlandson, John Constable and Edwin Landseer.

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The RA Schools is still an important part of the Academy and offers free tuition to all who study here. To help to fund the schools and other activities, the RA put on a series of world-class exhibitions throughout the year. Recent exhibitions have featured well known artists Ai Weiwei and Anselm Kiefer, but also feature lesser known artists like American abstract artist Richard Diebenkorn and the Renaissance artst Giovanni Battista Moroni.

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One of the most prestigious events of the Academy is the annual Royal Academy summer exhibition of new art, which is a well-known event on the London social calendar. Anyone can submit pictures for inclusion in the exhibition and those selected join the works of the Academicians. There are a number of social events associated with the exhibition and many of the works are available for purchase.

The Royal Academy of Arts is based in Burlington House, Piccadilly W1J 0BD.

Opening times

Monday 10am – 6pm
Tuesday 10am – 6pm
Wednesday 10am – 6pm
Thursday 10am – 6pm
Friday 10am – 10pm
Saturday 10am – 6pm
Sunday 10am – 6pm

For more information, visit the RA website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review – High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson at The Queen’s Gallery from 13th November 2015 to 14 February 2016

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The High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson at The Queen’s Gallery exhibition  explores Rowlandson’s life and art, it also reflects how popular his work was amongst members of the British monarchy especially George III, George IV, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. Despite being the subject of some of Rowlandson’s satirical humour, George III (1738-1820)  began the collection of around 1,000 caricature prints by Rowlandson in the Royal Collection today.  Around 100 works by Rowlandson  are on display in the exhibition, many of remarkable quality that show Rowlandson’s skill in great detail and clarity.

Thomas Rowlandson studied at the Royal Academy, a very skilled draughtsman, he developed a talent for portraiture. He also possessed  a  humorous outlook  and an eye for the absurd which led him to design and make comical prints for London publishers. His subject matter  included  all elements of British life featuring fashion, love, political life and the royal family.

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Satirical printmaking was enormously popular in Georgian Britain where  satirical prints were shown in print shop windows and collected by the fashionable elite who often pasted them into albums, walls and decorative screens. One such screen is featured in the exhibition, some of these screens were illustrated by risqué material  and were folded up and put away in polite company.

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Rowlandson and other caricaturists of Georgian Britain including James Gillray, James Sayers and the Cruikshank family often attacked members of the elite especially politicians, foreign enemies and  members of the royal family. The victims did not always take it in good humour and although George IV enjoyed collecting caricatures, he did suppress prints that showed him in a bad light.

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Rowlandson did not set himself up as paragon of virtue, when he came into a large inheritance, he  gambled and drank till it had all gone. The rest of his career saw him using his talent to make money but would  face poverty periodically, this lifestyle gave him considerable insight into everyday life in an era of considerable social, cultural and political upheaval.

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The political personalities of the day  including Charles James Fox and William Pitt the Younger were favourite targets for Rowlandson and the exhibition has many examples of his attacks on the corrupt political system, one of the highlights is a print that features the  glamorous Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, who it was claimed had traded kisses for votes in the Westminster election of 1784.

The rise and fall of Napoleon is charted in a series of prints including  The Two Kings of Terror, in which Napoleon and Death sit face to face on the battlefield after Napoleon’s defeat at Leipzig in 1813.

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Other highlights of the exhibition include Doctor Convex and Lady Concave, Sketches at – an Oratorio!, and A York Address to the Whale in which  the Duke of York thanks a whale for distracting attention from accusations that his mistress was paid by army officers for securing their promotions. The exhibition also features  a number of watercolours by Rowlandson which includes a number of the artist’s landscapes.

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This entertaining and informative exhibition explores the work of one of the wittiest and most talented caricaturists of Georgian Britain, visitors can get a flavour of the period through the eyes of an artist who recorded the era in all its intimate detail. The quality of the prints illustrate  Rowlandson’s  skill as an artist and his eye for the comic and the absurdities of the age.

A ticket to this exhibition includes free access to the Masters of the Everyday: Dutch Artists in the Age of Vermeer exhibition in the Queen’ s Gallery.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets visit the Royal Collection website here

High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson is at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace,

13 November 2015 – 14 February 2016

Open daily, 10:00-17:30

Adult £10.00

Under 17/Disabled £5.20

Under 5 Free

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Review : The RA Schools Show at RA Schools Studios – 12th to 28th June 2015

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The RA Schools Show is the annual exhibition of works by final year students at the historic Royal Academy Schools, the first art school in Britain. The RA Schools was founded in 1769, and  are unique in offering the only three-year postgraduate programme in Europe. Perhaps more unusually,there are no fees and there is no curriculum but they centre the course around the specific needs of each individual artist. The RA Schools are partly supported by funds raised by the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and are located within the Royal Academy complex behind Burlington Arcade.

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The RA Schools Show offers rare opportunity for visitors to walk around the historical RA Schools studios which are normally hidden from public view. The show itself showcase the talents of the next generation of artists, with exhibits including painting, sculpture, video, installation, photography and live installations.

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Many famous artists have studied at RA Schools including  J. M. W. Turner, John Soane, Thomas Rowlandson, William Blake, Thomas Lawrence, John Constable,  David Wilkie, William Etty and Edwin Landseer. More recently the Schools have taught Matthew Darbyshire, Anthony Caro and Rachel Champion.

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Following these illustrious predecessors are this years class of 2015 which includes Caroline Abbotts, Rebecca Ackroyd, Victoria Adam, Matt Ager, Sofie Alsbo, Hannah Bays, Josie Cockram, Henry Coleman, Adam Collier, Ziggy Grudzinkskas, Declan Jenkins, Maria de Lima, Evelyn O’Connor, Laurence Owen, Max Prus, Sean Steadman and Joel Wyllie.

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Each student offers their own particular vision of contemporary art with a diversity of approaches, media and materials, including woodcut prints, paintings,ceramics, sculptures and live installations.

Walking around the labyrinth of the studios is an experience in itself with each room offering a self contained display, a map is provided to navigate the studios and the corridors which are full of old sculptures and all kinds of weird and wonderful objects.

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Many of the students have created their own particular narratives that offer a complex array of ideas and objects, there is plenty of interest and for anyone interested in collecting contemporary art, many of the works are for sale.

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The RA Schools is a fascinating place and the RA Schools Show is an ideal opportunity to explore the historic yet very modern space, it is also a opportuniy to consider the work of the class of 2015 and consider whether they will the famous artists of the future.

Admission is free

Opening Times

10am – 6pm daily

10am –  10pm on Fridays.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review : Bonaparte and the British at the British Museum – 5 Feb to 16 Aug 2015

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Bonaparte and the British: prints and propaganda in the age of Napoleon.

This exhibition focuses on the printed propaganda that either reviled or glorified Napoleon Bonaparte at the turn of the 19th century. It explores how his formidable career coincided with the peak of political satire as an art form on both sides of the English Channel. 2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo – the final undoing of the brilliant French general and emperor Napoleon Bonaparte

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The works from the British Museum’s own extensive collection are supported by loans from Sir John Soane’s Museum, the Wellington Collection at Apsley House and others.

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The exhibition features the works by British satirists who followed the pattern of caricature and traditional satire popularised by Hogarth earlier in the century.  The political and military tensions of the time allowed the British satirists notably James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, Richard Newton and George Cruikshank to become extremely popular both in Britain and across Europe.

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The booming print trade of the late 18th, early 19th century allowed London publishers to make considerable profits and provide high quality prints to the middle and upper classes.

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The exhibition examines how the British and French printmakers followed a widely differing stance on the promotion and denigration of the image of Napoleon Bonaparte.

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The exhibition traces the often different British responses  to  Napoleon  over his career,  whilst celebrating British victories especially Nelson’s triumph in the Battle of the Nile in 1798, the prints also deal with  fear of invasion in 1803, the death of Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 and Napoleon’s triumph at Austerlitz. The fall of Napoleon was glorified with  delight at his military defeats from 1812 leading to his exile to Elba in 1814. His defeat at Waterloo and final exile to St Helena show some prints happy to consign Napoleon to the dustbin of history but uneasy about the restoration of the French king Louis XVIII.

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Some  of the most interesting items in the exhibition is eleven watercolours of the battlefield of Waterloo from a private collection, including three long panoramas, which are on public show for the first time. These are the earliest known studies of the battlefield made only two or three days after the fighting concluded.

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There were many British supporters  of  Napoleon and the exhibition has a number of his personal items  collected by them including  a cast of his death mask.

This Free exhibition provides an intriguing insight into one of the least explored aspect of the age of Napoleon. The conflicts that formed some of the most crucial events in European political and social history were fought on the battlefield but also amongst the hearts and minds of civilians who were exposed to many different aspects of propaganda. The exhibition clearly illustrates the French and British approach was vastly different with British satire reaching new heights of artistic expression mainly through the works of James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, Richard Newton and George Cruikshank.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

 If you would like more information visit the British Museum website here

Bonaparte and the British: prints and propaganda in the age of Napoleon

5 February – 16 August  2015

Free, Room 90

Opening hours 10.00–17.30 Saturday to Thursday and 10.00–20.30 Fridays.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : Bonaparte and the British by Tim Clayton and Sheila O’ Connell ( British Museum Press )

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2015 marks the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo and the British Museum explores the rise and fall of Napoleon Bonaparte with an exhibition of printed propaganda of the period. The exhibition entitled Bonaparte and the British: Prints and Propaganda in the age of Napoleon looks at the role of the political and social satirists who reviled or glorified Napoleon Bonaparte, on both sides of the English Channel.
In this accompanying book to the exhibition, the focus is not the conflict itself but the propaganda war between the two countries. The British Museum uses its extensive collection of Napoleon satirical prints to illustrate that different aspects of the conflict which often led to particular responses.

The book begins by considering how in the late 18th century,the London print trade saw a remarkable period of growth. British designers and engravers were highly fashionable and their products were sold and copied all across Europe. The market for printed images was huge, covering a wide range of interests including fine art, architecture, portraiture, military and sporting scenes, animal, science illustrations and much more. Printed images were not just restricted to paper, images could be found on fans, pottery, tiles and textiles. Although most of the finer prints were made for the upper and middle classes, there were cheaper and cruder images for the working classes.
Against the background of a huge market for printed material, there developed a niche market for political satire prints, often sold by booksellers in specialist caricature shops located in the more fashionable areas of the city. The bookseller would often display new caricatures in the window to attract spectators, although some opened exhibition rooms within the shops and charged for admission.

Napoleon from his earliest days as a general took a serious interest in self promotion and was interested in how to use the print industry to present heroic images of himself. The print by Guiseppe Longhi from 1798 shows Bonaparte as a slight, flag waving young hero, sword in hand. As Bonaparte’s reputation grew the print became an iconic image widely collected by his supporters. It was prints of Bonaparte as the hero that appealed mostly to him and his followers, they only seemed to take an interest in caricature as a means of countering the efforts of his enemies.

In contrast to Bonaparte’s interest in the fine art print, the British market since Hogarth had used political and social satire to show the ills of the nation. The 1790s in Britain were a time of unrest and discontent, bearing the brunt of satirical attacks were the generally unpopular King George III and William Pitt.
However if the establishment were mocked for domestic issues, in foreign affairs most satirical prints attacked the opposition for allegedly supporting Bonaparte and the republicans in France.

The next few chapters of the book follow the changing perspectives towards Bonaparte often with references to how in times of war, unpopular leaders become popular and within a few years the admired become the reviled.

One of the most admired satirists of the early Napoleonic era was Isaac Cruikshank who portrayed Bonaparte as a mustachioed Jacobin Bandit, Richard Newton in 1797 takes up the theme of Bonaparte as a bandit  with his print of the Pope kissing Bonaparte’s backside. However for all the humour, there was real concern that Bonaparte may consider an attack on Britain, worsening domestic issues and series of naval mutinies exposed some of the British  weaknesses.
Bonaparte quickly realised that for all Britain’s weakened state, the French Navy was no match for the Royal Navy and decided to head east and took over Malta and landed in Egypt. Although Bonaparte achieved success on land, his ships moored in the mouth of Nile was destroyed by Nelson’s fleet.

Interestingly the reaction of the satirists such as Issac Cruikshank and James Gillray was  a glorification of Nelson’s success but showed little malice against Bonaparte himself but more a savage attack on his supporters in the British opposition camp namely Sheridan and Fox.

A common theme amongst the British satirists of the time  was to use John Bull as a national personification of Great Britain opposing the schemes of Bonaparte, John Bull had been a popular character from the early 1800s, Hogarth amongst others had made him a heroic figure who preferred the simple pleasures of life as opposed to the perceived corruption of the upper classes and monarchy.

Returning from Egypt, Bonaparte wasted no time in consolidating his power by replacing the Directory, the satirists response was to paint Bonaparte as a modern-day Cromwell pursuing  personal power at the expense of the more noble values of the French Revolution. The print entitled The Corsican Crocodile dissolving the council of Frogs published by William Holland illustrates this point.

With Bonaparte in almost complete control, the propaganda machine in France went into overdrive and with military success in many areas of Europe were at pains to show Bonaparte as a worthy and romantic hero.
In 1801, domestic issues led to the resignation of Pitt and his successor Henry Addington opened negotiations for a peace treaty. The Treaty of Amiens was signed in 1802, the demise of Pitt and the promise of peace was widely celebrated by satirists however certain artists namely James Gillray with his The First kiss this ten years ! was a little bit more wary suggesting that Bonaparte could not be trusted.

With wealthy Britons flocking across the channel after the treaty, the satirists  on both side of the channel began to concentrate on exposing certain national characteristics. Philibert Louis Debucourt’s Oh ! C’est bien c’a of 1803 is one of the first to comment on the uncouth dress sense and clumsiness of the English.

The fragile treaty eventually broke down in the middle of 1803 and the conflict was resumed, both sides blamed each other and a flood of caricatures flooded the print shops giving justification for the renewal of hostilities. It was in this period that Bonaparte become widely portrayed as ‘Little Boney’, James Gillray in his print German Nonchalance or the vexation of Little Boney is credited with this particular image that became the most popular description of Bonaparte in Britain for the rest of his life. This theme was taken to extraordinary lengths by Gillray again with his The King of Brobdingnag and Gulliver which has a very small Bonaparte perched on the palm of George III .
When Bonaparte was crowned Emperor in 1804, there was widespread vilification in Britain and a number of grand portraits of the new Emperor in France. In 1805 the conflict escalated and other countries were dragged into the conflict. William Pitt also returned as prime minister which led to James Gillray’s famous image The Plum pudding in Danger which depicts Pitt and Bonaparte carving up the globe between them.

The question of global domination was overshadowed in Britain by the death of one of its greatest heroes, Nelson’s death at Trafalgar led to widespread mourning and a large number of prints depicting his heroic death in battle. The death of Pitt in 1806 was not as widely mourned but after Trafalgar, British naval power eventually led to blockades of the French coast. However it would be  the Peninsular war and Napoleon’s ill-fated incursion into Russia that proved a major turning point in the conflict. Unsurprisingly the setbacks for Napoleon were widely celebrated in Britain and the print sellers found a domestic and international market for the works of Gillray, Rowlandson and George Cruikshank. In 1813, a new coalition inflicted a number of defeats on Bonaparte’s armies culminating in the battle of Leipzig, where eventually the French Emperor was faced with no choice but to abdicate in 1814. Prints then began to portray Bonaparte as someone who was willing to sacrifice thousands of young men on the altar of his great ambition and that he was facing his own judgement day where he would be sent to hell.
The Treaty of Paris of 1814 exiled Napoleon to Elba and the monarchy was restored in France, once again English visitors travelled to France in 1814 and 1815 and once again the French caricaturists mocked their bad manners, gluttony and terrible dress sense.  But these concerns were soon overshadowed by Napoleon’s return to France and the threat of another war, however the new conflict was relatively short-lived with Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo in 1815.
Once again Bonaparte was exiled, this time to St Helena and this time there would be no return. A print  by Lacroix shows Wellington and Prussian commander Prince Blucher pushing Napoleon into a dustbin portraying the idea that the French leader had finally been consigned to the dustbin of history.
The prints after the demise of Bonaparte was generally muted due to the unease about the new shape of Europe and domestic issues still to be addressed.

Although this book concerns itself with how the Propaganda war between the British and French was fought out over the period of the reign of Napoleon. It is intriguing on many other levels. The contrast of the state machine behind Napoleon which provides glorious depictions of their leader and the satirical caricatures of the British could not be wider. The British tradition following Hogarth was not without its own issues, the question of free speech and what you could publish was a constant dilemma which led to many artists and printsellers spending time in prison. Attacks on the monarchy and the church were especially problematic with frequent crackdowns.
Another question that is raised is to what extent were the prints funded by the government in their own propaganda war. One of the leading artists of the period, James Gillray received money from government funds at certain periods of his career.
This informative and entertaining book features a large number of stunning prints from the British Museum’s vast collection with a comprehensive commentary on the trends and themes of the time. The book highlights that some of issues of free speech, the image of our leaders, manipulation of public opinion and government propaganda that are often considered modern problems actually have considerable historical precedents.
Recent events in Paris indicate that political satire still has the ability to outrage often creating conflicts of interest that fan the flames of intolerance. However  it is not always predictable, one of the lessons of this book is that for all the propaganda to demonise Bonaparte , he was often admired and respected even by his enemies.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like find out more or buy a copy of the book, visit the British Museum shop here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : London (A View From the Streets) by Anna Maude (British Museum Press)

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Whilst most people are aware of the numerous objects on show at the British Museum, they may be surprised that they have an extensive collection of visual material that illustrates the topography of London.  This material provided  the author of this book with collection of fascinating images about the everyday life of Londoners at a time when London was undergoing unprecedented changes.

London of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries was transformed beyond recognition, perhaps surprisingly it was a transformation that was largely ignored by the great artists of the day but provided plenty of material for other artists especially the graphic satirists.

It is the work of artists such as George Scharf and Thomas Schotter Boys who delighted in sketching ordinary London life that offer great insight into how Londoners  went about their business in the growing metropolis.

These artists generally provided a slightly sanitised view of the London street, the satirists went to the other extreme illustrating the low life, dirt and chaos. Chief amongst the satirists were the work of William Hogarth, George Cruikshank and Thomas Rowlandson whose prints were very popular.

The book is divided into different sections which illustrate different aspects of London life over this period. The sections include Celebration, Eating and Drinking, Shopping, Pleasure, Traffic and Transport, Construction and finally Fire, Crime and Punishment.

Celebration offers evidence that whereas modern London often has parades in the streets, in the 18th and 19th centuries most of the most impressive celebrations took place on the river or in the parks. Canaletto’s view of a Lord Mayor flotilla show literally hundreds of boats on the river. The etching  of the opening of new London bridge in 1831 replicates the scene with the addition of a hot air balloon above the pageant.

One of the areas that provided plenty of material was eating and drinking, for the satirists especially the drinking habits of the population often defined the age. Hogarth offers a visual illustration of the beneficial aspects of drinking beer (Beer Street) against the ravaging effects of drinking gin (Gin Lane).

Other artists preferred to show the comedic aspects of social drinking  such as Boitard in his Covent Garden Morning Frolic.

Shopping in London in this period began to see the emergence of a luxury retail market in the City and the West End, Scharf’s pictures of the Old Covent Garden Market and Westminster Dairy on Regent Street shows how the elite went about their shopping. Compare this to the poor who frequented the markets at the lower end  like Rag Fair or tried to make living by selling goods on the street.

Like today, London in the eighteenth and nineteenth century offered boundless opportunity for leisure and entertainment. Frost Fairs, Pleasure Gardens, and Theatre all had their passing phases of success but the nineteenth century especially saw the large Fairs such Bartholomew Fair closed down due to what was considered licentious and depraved behaviour.

What took their places in the nineteen century was the Great Exhibitions, the most prestigious being the Great Industrial Exhibition of 1851 ,the  illustration by Joseph Nash offers a view of the Crystal Palace in all its splendour , a testament to London’s wealth and power.

The Traffic and  transport section and the construction section will bring a smile to the modern Londoner, carriage rage was a precedent of road rage wonderfully illustrated by Rowlandson , streets were often in gridlock, and the roads were often ripped up to install sewers.

There was  also a construction boom with many new bridges across the Thames and docks being built to accommodate thousands of ships. The etching of Old and New London bridges by Edward William Cooke in 1832 charts the gradual destruction of much of medieval London to be replaced by the new modern London.

Perhaps the one area, the modern reader would find difficult to relate to is  the Fire, crime and punishment section. Fire’s such as the one that is shown devastating the Albion mills are relatively rare and the pictures of the Pillory at Charing Cross, the Fleet Prison and the public execution  at Tower Hill seem barbaric.

If you are interested in 18th and 19th century London, this is a little gem of a book with lavish illustrations  and informative commentaries. Many of the illustrations have not been seen since they were first published and offer a humorous, interesting and sometimes surprising view of London life.  Dr Johnson famously stated ” when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.”  This book illustrates Dr Johnson’s point by portraying the incredible diversity of a city in transformation.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like more information or to buy a copy of the book, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here