Home » Posts tagged 'The Shard'

Tag Archives: The Shard

Exhibition Review – Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings at the Royal Academy of Arts from 15th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts present an exhibition of the internationally-renowned architect and Honorary Royal Academician Renzo Piano. The exhibition entitled Renzo Piano: The Art of Buildings is the first comprehensive survey of Piano’s career to be held in London since 1989, and is located in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens.

Renzo Piano  is one of the world’s leading architects and is primarily known for his work on the Centre Pompidou in Paris, The Shard in London and the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.  In 1981 the architect founded the Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), located in Paris, Genoa and New York, which, with a team of 150 staff, has realised over 100 projects that include large cultural and institutional buildings, housing and offices, as well as urban plans for entire city districts.

Born into a family of Italian builders, Piano has incorporated the practical aspects of this background with experimentation with form, material and engineering to create a coherent whole. Piano is known for his attention to detail in the design process, constantly testing the way that the buildings will look and feel.

The exhibition offers  an overview of the architect’s practice through sixteen of his most significant projects, dating from his early career when he was experimenting with innovative structural systems, to some of his best known buildings of the present day. Highlights include Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971), Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa (1998), The New York Times Building (2007), The Shard, London (2012), Jérôme Seydoux Pathé Foundation, Paris (2014) and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).

The projects are laid out on tables in a couple of the galleries and are a mixture of archival material, models, photographs and drawings. Each project display gives some insights into the design process but perhaps more importantly into the conceptual theme of each particular building.

To understand more about how Piano sees the world and the role of architecture within it, there is a specially commissioned film by Thomas Riedelsheimer in the central gallery.

Also in the central gallery is large centrepiece that is a sculptural installation designed by RPBW especially for the exhibition, illustrating 100 of Piano’s projects on an imaginary island.

Around the walls of the gallery are 32 photographs by Gianni Berengo Gardin, large drawings of various projects and hanging from the ceiling are various models of different pieces of materials used in the design process.

Architecture is often quite a difficult form to show in art galleries, very often models do not do justice to the large-scale of the actual buildings. However this fascinating exhibition is more concerned in providing some insights into the work, aspirations and achievements of an architect who believes in the many possibilities of architecture.  The new Royal Academy is committed to raising the profile and appreciation of architects and architecture, this high-profile exhibition provides a wonderful launching board for many other exhibitions on the subject.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended   

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings at the Royal Academy of Arts – 15th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

In autumn 2018, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of the internationally-renowned architect and Honorary Royal Academician Renzo Piano. This will be the first comprehensive survey of Piano’s career to be held in London since 1989, and will be presented in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens, on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the Royal Academy.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop,
The Shard, London Bridge Tower and London Bridge Place, London, 2012.
© RPBW. Photography: William Matthews.

Renzo Piano  is one of the world’s leading architects and his buildings have enriched cities and spaces across the globe. From designing the Centre Pompidou in Paris as a young architect with Richard Rogers, to projects including The Shard in London and the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, Piano’s work continues to pioneer ground-breaking architecture that touches the human spirit. In 1981 the architect founded the Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), located in Paris, Genoa and New York, which, with a team of 150 staff, has realised over 100 projects that include large cultural and institutional buildings, housing and offices, as well as urban plans for entire city districts.

Born into a family of Italian builders, Piano places great importance on the crafting of elegant structures that embody a sense of lightness. Designing buildings “piece by piece”, Piano’s practice makes deft use of form, material and engineering to achieve a precise yet poetic elegance. He has a command of the entire process, from the structural systems to individual building components, designed for optimum technical performance as well as aesthetic and haptic qualities. Such is the importance of these aspects of the architecture, that full-scale mock-ups of sections of the buildings are created during the design process to test how they will look and feel, from the composition as a whole, to smaller technical details.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop,
Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa, 1998.
© RPBW. Photography: Sergio Grazia / ADCK – centre culturel Tjibaou.

Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings will offer an overview of the architect’s practice through sixteen of his most significant projects, dating from his early career when he was experimenting with innovative structural systems, to the signature buildings of the present day. Highlights include Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971), Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa (1998), The New York Times Building (2007), The Shard, London (2012), Jérôme Seydoux Pathé Foundation, Paris (2014) and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).

Rarely seen archival material, models, photographs and drawings will reveal the process behind the conception and realisation of Piano’s best known buildings. For example, on display will be one of the original models made during the design process for the Menil Collection in Houston (1986), showing how Piano and his team rigorously explored creative ways to bring natural light into the galleries, creating spaces that would be ideal for viewing art. Other highlights will include the white ceramic rods from the 1:1 mock-up of The New York Times Building, produced to test their scale, surface and reflectivity, as well as the original competition drawings for the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre in Noumea that captivated the jury.

At the heart of the exhibition, there will be a focus on the architect himself through 32 photographs by Gianni Berengo Gardin and a specially commissioned film by Thomas Riedelsheimer highlighting Piano’s personal sensibilities and attitude to architecture  The centrepiece of this space will be a sculptural installation designed by RPBW especially for the exhibition, bringing together 100 of Piano’s projects on an imaginary island.

The exhibition will provide an exceptional insight into the work, aspirations and achievements of a man who believes passionately in the possibilities of architecture. It will demonstrate that far from being a straightforward art-form, architecture is a complex profession that carries social, political and financial responsibilities.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Kids Go Free during May Half-Term at The View from The Shard – 25th May to 31st May 2015

untitled

During the May half-term school holidays, each paying adult to The View from The Shard visiting between Monday 25th May and the Sunday 31st May 2015 is entitled to two child tickets free of charge.

untitled3333

The View from The Shard offers a 64km (40 mile), 360-degree view of London  offering views of many of the capital’s  modern and historic landmarks, including The Houses of Parliament, The Tower of London, Buckingham Palace, the Olympic Park and Wembley Stadium.

untitled5555

The attraction has a number of  multimedia displays and state of the art technology to amuse the children with  super-fast lifts to the top of the building . On Level 69, high-tech, interactive ‘Tell:scopes’  provide information about surrounding landmarks, and offer the chance to see how the capital’s architecture has changed over the centuries with historic views from the Museum of London archives dating back as far as Roman times.

untitled9999

Throughout half-term visitors can play the ultimate game of Top Trumps from London’s highest view point! Take the quiz and seek out clues on giant versions of the cards.

For more information or Tickets, visit The View from The Shard website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review : The View from the Shard

1-The-Shard

Since its opening in 2013, The View from The Shard has established itself as a major attraction in London.
To illustrate why ? we are going to take you on a journey to the highest vantage point of any building in Western Europe.

DSCN3886
The entrance is situated next to London Bridge station and the ultra modern ticket and foyer area is full of screens that tell you a little about the attraction and the London Bridge area.
Unlike many attractions there is very little waiting times as tickets are allocated in time slots, after going through security you are escorted to the lifts.
Visitors can travel in four separate lifts up and down to the viewing galleries. The lifts travel at six metres per second, making the total lift journey time from Level 1 to level 68 around 60 seconds.

DSCN3882

Although this seems extremely fast, there is entertainment in the ‘kaleidoscopic’ lifts which use video screens and mirrors to create the effect of soaring through iconic ceilings and roofs of London.  As you travel towards the pinnacle of The Shard, it seems that the lifts pass through the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral, the Rubens ceiling at the Banqueting House in Whitehall, the spiral staircase at Monument, and the British Museum’s Great Court glass roof.

Time in the lift is limited because on Level 33, visitors transfer to other lifts to make the final ascent.
Visitors depart the lifts at The Cloudscape level 68. Here the view is obscured with cloudscapes that tease the visitor and delays the excitement until you reach Level 69.

DSCN3875

Level 69 is the triple-height, light-filled, main viewing gallery where amazing, 360 degree views for up to 40 miles (64km) over the capital are revealed.

DSCN3837
You are now nearly 244m (800ft) high and the familiar sights take on a very different perspective, looking down on the skyscrapers in the nearby City of London is quite a strange experience.

DSCN9418
But it’s probably the meandering river Thames and the snaking trains moving in and out of London that catch your eye first, however when you have got your bearings you begin to recognise many of London landmarks.

DSCN9431

In the North there is Wembley Stadium and Alexandra Palace, in the East is The Olympic Stadium, the Tower of London, Tower Bridge, Canary Wharf and the Thames Barrier.
The South is probably the most difficult to pick out landmarks other than Battersea Power Station and The Oval cricket ground. In the West is St Paul’s Cathedral, Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament and Buckingham Palace.
Also in the West is the London Eye which seems like a small play wheel next to the river.

tell_scopes_3

If you cannot find landmarks yourself, you can use the ‘Tell:scopes’ – ultra high-tech digital telescopes,The Tell:scopes enable visitors to explore the city around them in real time, as well as offering alternative (pre-recorded) day and night-time views.  Fully interactive, they are able to identify over 200 famous landmarks and places of significant interest and offer information about them in 10 languages.

DSCN9376

For the adventurous you can go still higher to the partially outdoor viewing gallery Level 72 (800ft/244m)
Level 72  at the very highest public level of the building, partially open-air and exposed to the elements, visitors are surrounded by the giant shards of glass that form the top of The Shard.
This level unlike the level below is an unusual experience which makes you realise that you are standing high above London with little above you other than large shards of glass.

DSCN9377

There is no time limit to your stay on the viewing platforms but there is no seating and only The Sky Boutique – the highest shop in London to offer an alternative to the views.

Visitors who wish to descend go to the multimedia-enhanced lifts that reflect the trip back down to earth. The sky recedes, the seasons change, and the hustle and bustle of the streets of London comes into focus.  Visitors arrive back in the ground floor gallery, and an extensive gift shop.

DSCN9346

The View from Shard is unlike any other view in London and is really not advisable for those with fears of heights, its uniqueness and seamless organisation offers considerable advantages over other height related attractions such as the London Eye.
One question which is often asked is “Is the View from the Shard an attraction for children as well ?”
To test this on my visit I took along my seven-year old granddaughter, she has been on the London Eye and other height related London attractions so has no fears of heights.
One big bonus point for the View from the  Shard was the lack of queueing which meant the children do not have time to get fractious before going into the attraction.
When we entered the attraction, she enjoyed the multimedia in the foyer and the lifts and was taken aback with the views from the viewing platforms, she had considerable fun pointing out different landmarks and taking photographs.
She enjoyed the Tell:scopes which were easy to operate and offered alternative views over time, however on Level 72 she was not too pleased to see it was open and quickly went back to the lower level.
Her reaction and watching other children on the viewing platforms led me to believe that the attraction is wonderful for children but probably those over the age of five, younger children than this would probably get very little from the experience.
Older children would generally really enjoy the experience, even teenagers seemed genuinely excited to be high above the London streets.

The View from the Shard often offers Children go Free periods, these would be well worth taking up if you are on a tight budget.

DSCN9489

The View from the Shard attraction will appeal to people who would like to experience going to the top of the tallest building in Western Europe. It offers a unique perspective of London and the surrounding areas from one of London’s newest iconic buildings

It will appeal to most age groups , but is probably not ideally suitable for very young children.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

To find out more information or to book tickets, click here

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.

There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Shard

shard1

The Shard

Location – The View from The Shard, Joiner Street, London SE1 3UD

1000px-Cmglee_Horminan_London_skyline

The Shard is the tallest building in London standing at a height of 1,016ft (310m), it is also the tallest building in Western Europe. The 87 storey skyscraper construction began in 2009 and completed in 2012, it is jointly owned by Sellar Property and the State of Qatar. The Shard has been one of the most controversial of the new skyscrapers to appear in London in the last few years, much of the criticism has been that the Shard dwarfs the other generally low level buildings on the South Bank and distorts the skyline.

shard2

The Shard was designed by Italian architect Renzo Piano and is has multi functional uses.

73–87 Floors – Spire

68–72 Floors – The View from the Shard (observatory)

53–65 Floors – Residences

34–52 Floors – Hotel

31–33 Floors – Restaurants (Hutong, Oblix and Aqua Shard)

3–28  Floors – Offices

1–2     Floors – Retail and office reception

Ground Floor – Hotel, restaurant and observatory entrances

shard3

The View from The Shard

shard ent

The View from the Shard is a privately operated observation deck attraction which opened in 2013, you travel up to the 68, 69 and 72 floors where 800 feet above the streets of London you can on a clear day see for around 40 miles in each direction.

From October 2013 the opening hours will be: Sunday-Wednesday, 10am-7pm; and Thursday-Saturday, 10am-10pm.

Tickets from £24.95 Adults , £18.95 Child.

VLG Tip We recommend you book your tickets in advance. This way, you will avoid queues and also save money. Advance bookings can be made at any time online up to four months in advance, based on availability.

For more information visit the Shard Website here