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Exhibition Review – Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 at The Queen’s Gallery from 9 November 2018 to 28 April 2019


The Queen’s Gallery presents the first exhibition of Roger Fenton’s Crimean works in London since 1856, the exhibition entitled Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 explores how the photographer brought the stark realities of the Crimea war to the public through more than 60 photographs from the Royal Collection.

Roger Fenton was already a respected photographer (Queen Victoria had commissioned Fenton to produce portraits of the royal family in 1854) when he travelled to the Crimea.

He had been commissioned by the publishers Thomas Agnew & Sons to photograph people of interest in the Crimea for use as source material for a painting by the artist Thomas Barker. However, Fenton’s photographs of bleak terrains and exhausted soldiers would have a profound impact and marks one of earliest examples of war photography.

When Roger Fenton arrived in the Crimea in March 1855, the war had been fought for 12 months and many of the major battles of the campaign had already been fought. Fenton spent three months producing approximately 360 photographs, travelling and working in a mobile darkroom that he had converted from a wine merchant’s van. To a public that had been given selected information about the ‘great’ campaign and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, Fenton’s photographs were a stark reminder of the horrors of war.

In his most famous photograph, Valley of the Shadow of Death (23 April 1855), he places the viewer at the bottom of a barren ravine littered with cannonballs leaving it to the viewer’s imagination to create a picture of past events.

Britain sent 98,000 men into the conflict and Fenton spent several weeks photographing the key figures of the war. One of his best-known portraits, The Council of War (June 1855), shows the three commanders of the allied armies – Lord Raglan, Maréchal Pélissier and Omar Pasha preparing for an assault on the Russian fortifications. An exhausted looking Lord Raglan died shortly after the image was taken.

One of Fenton’s more haunting images in the exhibition is Lord Balgonie (1855), who seems to be suffering from some kind of psychological problem associated with the conflict.

The majority of Fenton’s portraits depicted senior officers, however he did photographs troops on the frontline usually around the cooking facilities or showing the after effects of battle.

Although Fenton did not produce scenes of battle and death, he photographs were a stark contrast to artistic depictions of battle which tended to glorify the conflict. Fenton returned to Britain in July 1855, and in September his Crimean photographs went on display at the Water Colour Society on Pall Mall. The images raised awareness of the conditions endured by soldiers and Queen Victoria took a personal interest in the conflict and the welfare of the troops. The exhibition features a 1856 painting by John Gilbert which shows Queen Victoria meeting wounded soldiers in Buckingham Palace in 1855.

This interest was translated into practical action when she became the first British monarch to meet and support wounded soldiers in public, personally greeting troops at Buckingham Palace and during visits to hospitals. She also instituted the Victoria Cross, which remains the highest award for gallantry in the British Armed Forces.

This thought-provoking exhibition provides some insights into how the advent of photography changed many of preconceptions of how war was presented to the public. Fenton’s photographic technical and practical skill created a body of work which amazes the modern viewer. It is important to remember that photography was still in its earliest development when Fenton travels to the Crimea and yet he produces portraits of considerable psychological depth and landscapes that live long in the memory.

Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 is at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, 9 November 2018 – 28 April 2019, with Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

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Exhibition Review – Russia: Royalty and the Romanovs at The Queen’s Gallery from 9 November 2018 to 28 April 2019


The Queen’s Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs which explores the relationship between the two countries and their royal families through works of art in the Royal Collection.

In 1698 Tsar Peter I, known as Peter the Great became the first Russian ruler to visit England and had meetings with the British King, William III. When he departed, Peter presented the King with his portrait, painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller.

This portrait in the exhibition and coronation portrait of Empress Catherine II (Catherine the Great) by Vigilius Eriksen, c.1765–9, thought to have been given to George III are indications of the rise of Russian power and how the rulers of Russian empire were looking to the west for inspiration to modernize the country.

The ties between Russia and the United Kingdom grew in the early 19th century when the allied forces, including those of Great Britain and Russia finally saw victory in the Napoleonic wars. George IV commissioned Sir Thomas Lawrence to paint portraits of the central figures in the defeat of Napoleon for the Waterloo Chamber at Windsor Castle. The paintings in the exhibition of Matvei Ivanovitch, Count Platov and of General Fedor Petrovitch Uvarov, recognised Russia’s important contribution to the defeat of Napoleon.

After the Napoleonic wars, the ties between the Royal Families of the UK and Russia increased and the exhibition includes evidence of the closer ties.

Empress Maria of Russia sent the Prince Regent’s daughter, Princess Charlotte, the insignia of the Order of St Catherine which was the most prestigious award for women in Imperial Russia. The Princess is shown wearing the badge on a Russian-style dress in a portrait of c.1817.

Gradually family ties were consolidated by marriages, in 1874, Queen Victoria’s second son Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh, married Grand Duchess Marie Alexandrovna, daughter of Emperor Alexander II, this event is recorded in Nicholas Chevalier’s painting of the ceremony.

Other marriages followed and the English, Russian and Danish royal families regularly visited one another and marked these occasions in paintings and photographs, and through the exchange of gifts which are featured in the exhibition.

The Danish artist Laurits Regner Tuxen was commissioned to record significant family events, including The Marriage of Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia in 1894 and The Family of Queen Victoria in 1887, celebrating the Queen’s Golden Jubilee that year.

Many of the gifts could be lavish, it was around this time that a great number of works by Carl Fabergé entered the Royal Collection. Among them are a framed portrait miniature of the Empress and a gold cigarette case, given to King Edward VII as a 40th wedding anniversary present in 1903.

Although connections between the two countries were never the same after 1918, in 1923 the Duchess of York (later Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother) commissioned a portrait of herself from the Russian artist Savely Sorine. Twenty-five years later she commissioned Sorine to paint a portrait of her daughter Princess Elizabeth, Duchess of Edinburgh, the future Queen Elizabeth II in 1956.

First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev and Premier Nikolai Bulganin presented Her Majesty The Queen with a number of gifts, including the oil painting A Winter’s Day by the prominent painter, Igor Grabar.

This fascinating and decorative exhibition illustrates the ever-changing relationships between the UK and Russia. From the early contacts with Peter the Great and Catherine the Great through to the close family ties in the 19th century and finally the tragic end of the Imperial family in 1918.
The remarkable collection of paintings and other gifts provide considerable insights into the ties that bound many of the royal families of Europe. These ties would be undone by many of the events of the 20th century especially the fall of the Romanovs which changed the political landscape of Europe forever.

Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 is at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, 9 November 2018 – 28 April 2019, with Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Buckingham Palace Family Festival Weekend – 4th to 5th August 2018

On Saturday, 4 and Sunday, 5 August, a two-day Family Festival at Buckingham Palace, the Royal Mews and The Queen’s Gallery will be packed with drop-in activities for children, from arts and crafts activities and dance workshops to storytelling sessions and dressing up opportunities.

For the first time, visitors to the Family Festival will have the chance to join special Garden Storytelling Adventure tours and discover the fascinating stories hidden around every corner of the famous Buckingham Palace garden.

In the Palace’s Family Pavilion, activities are inspired by Turquoise Mountain, one of the three charities founded by HRH The Prince of Wales.  Turquoise Mountain is based in Afghanistan, where kite flying is a famous children’s pastime, and children will have the opportunity to create and decorate their own colourful kites to take home and fly.

The Family Pavilion is also full of activities exploring the working life of Buckingham Palace, including a quiet area with books, colouring sheets and listening stations, and a soft-play area for under-fives.  Children of all ages can try on the uniform of The Queen’s Guards or dress up as princes and princesses and pose on a recreation of the Palace’s famous balcony.

Families visiting the Royal Mews will see the Ascot Landau carriage that transported TRH The Duke and Duchess of Sussex through the streets of Windsor after their wedding ceremony in May 2018, which is on display for the summer period.  Children will also be able to meet some of the royal horses that live at the Mews.  Drop-in activities throughout the weekend will include storytelling and arts and crafts sessions, and opportunities for children to dress up as a footman in specially created livery, learn how to harness a horse, and find out what it really feels like to ride in a royal carriage.

Activities at The Queen’s Gallery are inspired by the exhibition Splendours of the Subcontinent, which will form a glittering backdrop for Indian dance workshops with the South Asian dance company Akademi.  Families can try on sparkling pieces of replica Indian jewellery, before creating their own decorative motifs using sticky gems, sequins and gold ribbon.

Families visiting all three venues with a combined Royal Day Out ticket will have the chance to enter a competition to win a cuddly corgi.

The Buckingham Palace Family Festival is at Buckingham Palace, the Royal Mews and The Queen’s Gallery on Saturday, 4 and Sunday, 5 August, 11:00 – 15:00.

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Canaletto and the Art of Venice at The Queen’s Gallery – 19th May to 12th November 2017

The Royal Collection presents an exhibition that features one of the world’s finest group of paintings, drawings and prints by Venice’s famous painter, Canaletto (1697-1768). The exhibition explores the work of Canaletto and his relationship with Joseph Smith who was British Consul in Venice and became the artist’s agent and dealer.

The exhibition also presents a wide selection of eighteenth-century Venetian art, with Canaletto’s greatest works shown alongside paintings and drawings by Sebastiano and Marco Ricci, Francesco Zuccarelli, Rosalba Carriera, Pietro Longhi and Giovanni Battista Piazzetta.

The first room in the exhibition sets the scene with Ludovico Ughi’s map called Iconographic Representation of the Illustrious City of Venice, first printed in 1729. Venice was unlike any other city in the world being built on a series of islands and sandbanks in a shallow lagoon. The wealth of the city had led to a series of palaces being built along the canals with attractive churches and squares.

Venice’s political power had been tied closely to their maritime power and  two paintings by Canaletto pays testament to this relationship. A Regatta on the Grand Canal c.1733-4 illustrates spectators cheering the elaborately decorated eight-oared barges belonging to prominent Venetian families. The Bacino di San Marco on Ascension Day c.1733-4 provides a view of the great Venetian festival of the Wedding of the Sea where The Doge drops a ring into the sea to symbolise Venice’s maritime power.

Canaletto was born in Venice in 1697, the son of Bernardo Canal (1674–1744) who was a painter of stage sets. The artist initially followed in his father’s footsteps, but soon began producing paintings which included the city of Venice as his principal subject. However these views were not just reproduced, Canaletto often moved buildings and changed perspectives to create a better dramatic effect. Many of the artists drawings are included in the exhibition including some of the most famous monuments of Venice—the Grand Canal, the square around the basilica of San Marco and its distinctive Campanile (bell tower).

Venice was considered an important place on the Grand Tour undertaken by wealthy Europeans, to cater for this clientele, the city provided places of entertainment. One of the most popular forms of entertainment in this period was Opera and Theatre, Venice had nineteen opera houses, and the opera season coincided with Carnival.

The exhibition illustrates how Canaletto transformed the cityscape of Venice into a profitable subject to sell to British Grand Tourists, but another popular subject in Venetian art was rural landscapes which were often used as a setting for episodes from biblical stories or classical mythology. Marco Ricci and Francesco Zuccarelli made many landscape paintings, drawings and etchings to cater for this demand.

The city of Venice had been an important centre for printing for many centuries. However in the eighteenth century, printing became a mini industry to produce prints for visitors and collectors. Many artists in the city were attracted by this lucrative sideline, Canaletto, Marco Ricci and Giambattista Tiepolo began to experiment with etching.

‘Capriccio’ paintings and drawings refers to landscape or architectural compositions that combine real elements with elements of fantasy or imagination. The genre became associated with eighteenth century Venice and was popular among Grand Tourists. Several Venetian artists, especially Canaletto, Marco Ricci and the painter Antonio Visentini made many paintings and drawings of capriccio subjects.

Although many artists catered for the visitor market, other Venetian artists worked in a variety of media and subjects in a more traditional type of Italian painting, the exhibition features works by Sebastiano Ricci and Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini who painted on a large scale, using subject matter taken from history, literature or mythology.

The final room features Canaletto’s paintings of Venetian views with which he made his reputation. Joseph Smith commissioned many paintings from Canaletto for his own collection including a series of 12 paintings of the Grand Canal. Smith also commissioned a series of monumental views of Rome and arranged for Canaletto to travel and work in Britain where he stayed for almost ten years. Eventually in 1762, Smith decided to sell his extensive collection to George III and the remarkable collection has been in the Royal Collection ever since.

This fascinating exhibition offers an opportunity to discover Canaletto’s work in the context of a Venice that was in decline politically but was a popular destination for visitors to Italy. In many ways, Canaletto’s reputation has been tarnished by the work he did for the Grand Tourists. It has often been seen as low quality in a genre that was not highly valued. This exhibition provides plenty of evidence that this view obscures Canaletto considerable talents of a draughtsman and the sense of drama in his paintings. Since the artist’s death, the paintings have also provided a remarkable historical and visual account of the Venetian maritime empire in decline relying on tourism to maintain its past glories.

See Video Review here

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Canaletto & the Art of Venice is at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, 19 May – 12 November 2017.

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Portrait of the Artist at The Queen’s Gallery – 4th November 2016 to 17th April 2017

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This exhibition entitled Portrait of the Artist is the first  to focus on the images of artists from within the Royal Collection.  Self-portraits by world-renowned artists including Rembrandt, Rubens, Artemisia Gentileschi, Lucian Freud and David Hockney but also includes images of artists by their friends, fellow artists and pupils. One of the highlights of the exhibition is the most reliable surviving likeness of Leonardo da Vinci by his student, Francesco Melzi.

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Portrait of the Artist contains over 300 objects, including paintings, drawings, prints, photographs and decorative arts ranging in date from the fifteenth to the twenty-first century.

The exhibition provides evidence that images of artists increasingly appear from the fifteenth century onwards and was linked how artists were perceived in society during the Renaissance. Rather than being perceived as a talented craftsman, artists began to see self-portraiture as a way to demonstrate their talents and a way for self-promotion.

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The first objects in the exhibition consider how self-portraits and portraits of the artist family  and friends were crucial for the artist to practice their skills. Often this drawings were not intended to be seen by a wide audience and were often given away.  Self portraits in this section by Rubens, David Hockney and Lucien Freud illustrate how these informal drawings can often expose characteristics of the artists that are not exposed in a formal painting. 

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From these drawings, artist would sometimes undertake a full self-portrait painting to show to potential patrons or customers. How artists portrayed themselves was crucial to appeal to a specific audience. One of the first celebrity British artists was Joshua Reynolds who quickly understood the benefits of self promotion.

Many artists would include in their portraits, friends or family members. In the late eighteenth century, children and animals were often included the pictures to provide evidence of the artist in a family setting.  

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Perhaps not surprisingly, artists painted each other either as an homage to the other artist or as a visual record of their friendship. Rubens portrait of his pupil Van Dyck provides evidence of their mutual respect and friendship.

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The fame of certain artists led to portraits of artists being collected from the sixteenth century onwards, Charles I was one of the first people to actively collect and display portraits of artists. By the late 1630s he owned at least twelve portraits of artists, three of which were hung together in his private Breakfast Chamber at Whitehall Palace. Rarely a member of the Royal Family will paint a portrait of an artist, an example in the exhibition is the Duke of Edinburgh’s portrait of artist Edward Seago and Seago’s portrait of the Duke.

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Gradually artists began to include their self-portrait in a number of ways which affirmed their status. Sometimes the picture may include the artist painting within a landscape or a studio. Landseer even manages to include his dogs into his self-portrait.

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Increasingly it becomes common for artists to use a self-portrait as a way to explore different roles using clothes, props and setting. Some artists took this even further by including themselves in multi-figure narrative scenes. During the Renaissance, several artists included their image within an altarpiece and would sometimes include the person responsible for the commission.

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One common theme from the Renaissance was artists who presented themselves as outsiders to society, the image of artists has the tortured genius added to their mystique. Artemisia Gentileschi‘s unusual self-portrait is perhaps an indication of the difficulty of being a female artist in a period dominated by male artists.

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This fascinating and enjoyable exhibition illustrates the many aspects of self-portraiture and how the role of the artist changed considerably after the Renaissance. Many artists became celebrities in their own time and like today’s celebrities were very particular about their image in front and behind the picture. It is this complexity of motives and inspiration for self portraits that provide many of the themes in the exhibition.  

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Portrait of the Artist at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace – 4th November 2016 to 17th April 2017

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Artemisia Gentileschi, “Self-portrait as the Allegory of Painting (La Pittura), c. 1638-9.
Royal Collection Trust / ©  Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Portrait of an Artist at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, is the first exhibition to present self-portrait images of artists from within the Royal Collection.

Examining “creative genius” through more than 150 paintings, drawings, prints photographs and decorative arts, it shows some of the most important artists’ portraits owned by the monarch, including self-portraits by Daniel Mytens (c.1630), Sir Peter Paul Rubens (1623), a portrait of his former assistant Anthony van Dyck (c.1627-8), portraits by Rembrandt, Artemisia Gentileschi, Lucian Freud and David Hockney, and images of artists painted their friends,  relatives and pupils, including the surviving likeness of a chalk drawing of Leonardo da Vinci by his student, Francesco Melzi, to the recent conservation of the 17th-century allegorical Dutch painting titled “A Vanitas” by Pieter Gerritsz. van Roestraten (c.1630-1700), which previously hidden below a layer of varnish reveals a startling new dramatic element to the picture – a self-portrait of the artist at his easel painted as a reflection on a glass sphere.

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Pieter Gerritsz. van Roestraten, “A Vanitas”, c.1666-1700
Royal Collection Trust / ©  Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

The self-portraits, which were as a general rule intended to  “advertise” the artist’s talents are juxtaposed alongside more intimate and personal works examines themes, from the ‘cult’ of the artist to the symbolism  evoked through images of the artist’s studio. 

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Attributed to Francesco Melzi, Leonardo da Vinci, c.1515-18
Royal Collection Trust / ©  Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

The changing status of the artist from the 16th century to the role of the skilled artisan and medieval tradesmen’s guilds, replaced by workshops run by a masters and art academies recorded in the artists new literary artists’ biographies, such as Giorgio Vasari’s “Delle vite de’ piu eccellenti pittori scultori et architettori” (1568), which described the lives of over 150 artists are explored as is the relationship between artist and patron and role of patronage through monarchs commissioning, collecting and displaying portraits of artists.

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Jean-E‰tienne Liotard, A Self-Portrait, c.1753
Royal Collection Trust / ©  Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

The Royal Collection exhibition features 150 objects, including paintings, drawings, prints, photographs and decorative arts ranging in date from the fifteenth to the twenty-first century runs from Friday 4 November 2016 -Monday 17 April 2017.

Opening times

10.00-17.30. Last admission 16.15. 

Tickets

Adult £10.30. Concession £9.40. Under 17/Disabled £5.30. Under 5 Free.

Contributor : Pippa Jane Wielgos

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Scottish Artists 1750-1900: From Caledonia to the Continent at The Queen’s Gallery from 18th March to 9th October 2016

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The Queen’s Gallery present an exhibition that explores the work of Scottish Artists from 1750 to 1900 and brings together paintings, drawings and miniatures collected by monarchs from George III to Queen Victoria.

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The exhibition includes the work of painters who were born in Scotland and travelled abroad, such as Allan Ramsay and Sir David Wilkie, and of those whose inspiration remained in their native land, such as Alexander Nasmyth and James Giles.

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The first part of the exhibition features the two main 18th century Scottish artists who made international reputations. Allan Ramsay was born and trained in Edinburgh and continued his artistic education in Italy. He gradually established a successful studio in London as a portrait painter and was often employed to paint the Scottish nobility. In 1760, Ramsay was selected to paint the King’s state portrait became the first Scot to be appointed to the role of Principal Painter in Ordinary to His Majesty.

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David Wilkie was born in Fife, and trained in Edinburgh. He gradually built a reputation in London and abroad with scenes of everyday life . His two well-known commissions , Blind Man’s Buff and The Penny Wedding, for the Prince Regent (later George IV) are featured in the exhibition with his most important royal commission, The Entrance of George IV to Holyroodhouse which recorded the King’s visit to Scotland in 1822.

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The success of Wilkie and Ramsay led in the 19th century to a greater acceptance of Scottish painters and a number of these Scottish school of artists began to respond to wider interest in Scotland by painting the landscape and scenes from the literature or folklore of the nation. The interest in Scotland by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert further expanded a particular view of Scotland that was wild and dramatic. Paintings by James Giles of Balmoral in the exhibition and other drawings of highlanders in kilts illustrate the beginning of a mini industry in Scottish art. Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were extensively the subject of paintings and the exhibition features some early examples of the Queen by Sir Francis Grant.

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Other Scottish artists including David Roberts and John Phillip followed in Wilkie and Ramsay footsteps by travelling abroad. John Phillip painted a number of paintings in Spain, whilst David Roberts travelled to the Middle East and painted scenes of Egypt, the Holy Land, Syria and Palestine.

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These two strands of Scottish artists is the focus of an exhibition that challenges some of the preconceptions of Scottish art, the cultural domination of the Victorian view of Scotland masks the reality that Scottish artists were much more diverse in their subject matter than is widely accepted. In many ways, the Victorian paintings have obscured some of the triumphs and the international reputation of Wilkie and Ramsey. This interesting exhibition explores some of the contradictions and influences connected to Scottish artists, one of the ironies of the exhibition is that royal patronage especially in the Victorian period created its own particular view of Scotland that would dominate Scottish art for decades.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Scottish Artists 1750 – 1900: From Caledonia to the Continent is shown at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace with Maria Merian’s Butterflies.

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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