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Exhibition Review: Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain from 3 November 2021 to 20 March 2022

Tate Britain presents a major exhibition entitled Hogarth and Europe which explores the satirical depictions of 18th century England by William Hogarth (1697-1764). The exhibition places Hogarth in his historical context by comparisons with continental contemporaries.

The exhibition features many of Hogarth’s best-known paintings and prints, such as Marriage A-la-Mode 1743, The Gate of Calais 1748 and Gin Lane 1751, alongside works by famous European artists, including Jean-Siméon Chardin in Paris, Pietro Longhi in Venice, and Cornelis Troost in Amsterdam.

The exhibition features over 60 of Hogarth’s works, brought together from private and public collections around Europe and North America. Hogarth more than anyone caught the spirit of the age with his depictions of the enormous contrast of luxury and poverty.

Hogarth was influenced by 17th century Italian and Dutch paintings, however unlike many of his influences, he began to show the seedy and immoral side of urban life. In the 1730s he began his ‘modern moral series’: narratives charting the rise and fall of everyday characters corrupted by immorality and vice. Hogarth and Europe showcases these celebrated series, including A Rake’s Progress 1734.

The exhibition illustrates that cities became the background to enormous change all across Europe, showing the bustling London streets of Hogarth’s Southwark Fair 1733 and The March of the Guards to Finchley 1749-50 together with depictions of Étienne Jeaurat’s Paris and Longhi’s Venice.

Artists began to ply there trade in different countries, the exhibition features two pictures of London life by Canaletto.

The 18th century was a time of considerable turmoil in Europe, the old order was beginning to break down and opportunity and innovation attracted many into the cities. Hogarth casts his net wide and criticises the rich and the poor. The new heights of luxury emerged with extreme poverty in cities laid bare the great inequalities. European countries were not only exploiting their own populations but exploited colonies overseas.

Against the backdrop of this changing world, artists like Hogarth pioneered a new painting of modern life, revealing the pleasures and dangers of this brave new world. Hogarth was not only a moralist but also an entrepreneur making a fortune from his paintings and prints.

The 18th century also saw greater informality in portraiture, the exhibition ends in a room focusing on such pictures, including David Garrick with his Wife c.1757-64, Miss Mary Edwards 1742, a painting not seen in the UK for over a century. Other highlights include paintings of his sisters Mary and Anne Hogarth, as well as Heads of Six of Hogarth’s Servants c.1750-55.

This fascinating exhibition places Hogarth in an international context and explores the artist’s often contradictory career. It has always been difficult to pigeon hole Hogarth, his interest in morals was obvious, yet he seemed to enjoy his celebrity status as a bawdy satirist. He was not a reformer because he was often quite conservative in his views. In many ways, Hogarth reflected the age he lived in which looked to the past but enjoyed the many benefits and pleasures of the chaotic new world.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

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Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Hogarth and Europe at Tate Britain from 3 November 2021 to 20 March 2022

Few artists have defined an era as much as William Hogarth (1697-1764), whose satirical depictions of 18th century England provided a visual backdrop to the period. Tate Britain’s major exhibition Hogarth and Europe will present his work in a fresh light, seen for the first time alongside works by his continental contemporaries. It will explore the parallels and exchanges that crossed borders and the cosmopolitan character of Hogarth’s art. Hogarth’s best-known paintings and prints, such as Marriage A-la-Mode 1743, The Gate of Calais 1748 and Gin Lane 1751, will be shown alongside works by famous European artists, including Jean-Siméon Chardin in Paris, Pietro Longhi in Venice, and Cornelis Troost in Amsterdam.

William Hogarth
The Painter and his Pug, 1745
Tate

Featuring over 60 of Hogarth’s works, brought together from private and public collections around Europe and North America, the exhibition will draw on decades of research to show Hogarth in all his complexity – whether as staunch patriot or sharp critic, bawdy satirist or canny businessman. It will also examine the shifting status of artists in the 18th century, from workshop artisans and court painters to independent freelancers enjoying prominence alongside actors, musicians and writers.

William Hogarth
The March of the Guards to Finchley 1749 – 1750
© The Foundling Museum

The rapid expansion of urban centres like London, Paris, Amsterdam and Venice also saw the city itself become a major subject in art for the first time. Tate Britain will juxtapose these metropolitan scenes from across Europe, showing the bustling London streets of Hogarth’s Southwark Fair 1733 and The March of the Guards to Finchley 1749-50 together with depictions of Étienne Jeaurat’s Paris and Longhi’s Venice.

William Hogarth
Gin Lane, 1751
Andrew Edmunds

This was an age of opportunity and innovation, but also materialism, self-delusion, exploitation and injustice. In Europe, new heights of luxury emerged with extreme poverty, while growing cities saw overcrowding and disease. The rising demand for consumer goods at home came at the expense of the labour and lives of enslaved and colonised people overseas. Against the backdrop of this changing world, artists like Hogarth pioneered a new painting of modern life, revealing its pleasures and dynamism but also its dangers and stark inequalities.

William Hogarth
Marriage A-la-Mode: 2, The Tête à Tête, 1743-45
© The National Gallery, London

In the 1730s he began his ‘modern moral series’: narratives charting the rise and fall of everyday characters corrupted by immorality and vice. Hogarth and Europe will showcase these celebrated series, including A Rake’s Progress 1734, which were immediately popular and widely circulated through print.

William Hogarth
Miss Mary Edwards, 1742
The Frick Collection, New York, photo: Joe Coscia Jr.

The 18th century also saw greater informality and ease in portraiture, expressing the new ideas emerging around individuality and personal freedom that remain familiar today. The exhibition will culminate in a room focussing on such pictures, including Miss Mary Edwards 1742 – a painting not seen in the UK for over a century – depicting the eccentric, wealthy patron who commissioned many of Hogarth’s best-known works. Additional highlights will include paintings of his sisters Mary and Anne Hogarth, as well as Heads of Six of Hogarth’s Servants c.1750-55. The exhibition will look afresh at these and many other works by one of Britain’s most important artists, giving visitors a chance to see Hogarth’s position on the international stage in a new light.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Paula Rego at Tate Britain from 7 July to 24 October 2021

Paula Rego The Dance 1988. Tate © Paula Rego

Tate Britain presents the UK’s largest and most comprehensive retrospective of the work of Paula Rego. Rego who was born in Lisbon in 1935, helped to redefine figurative art and revolutionised the way in which women are represented. The exhibition tells the story of this artist’s remarkable life, highlighting the personal nature of much of her work and the socio-political context in which it is rooted.

Paula Rego Self-portrait in Red 1966. Museu Nacional de Arte Contemporanea do Chiado (Lisbon, Portugal) ©
Paula Rego

It reveals her broad range of references, from comic strips to history paintings. Featuring over 100 works including collage, paintings, large-scale pastels, drawings and etchings, the show spans Rego’s early work from the 1950s to her richly layered, staged scenes from the 2000s.

Paula Rego Interrogation 1950. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

In Interrogation 1950, painted at fifteen years of age, Rego asserted her commitment to denouncing injustices and in her paintings, collages and drawings from the 1960s to 70s, Rego fiercely opposed the Portuguese dictatorship, using a range of sources for inspiration including advertisements, caricatures and news stories. She also explored folk tales as representations of human psyche and behaviour, as with Brancaflor – The Devil and the Devil’s Wife in Bed 1975.

Paula Rego The Policeman’s Daughter 1987. Private collection © Paula Rego

Rego abandoned collage in 1980 and returned to painting, combining childhood memories with her experiences as a woman, wife and lover. The exhibition includes major paintings from this period such as examples from ‘The Vivian Girls’ series, in which girls rebel against a coercive society, and the seminal works that established Rego’s reputation when first exhibited at the Serpentine Gallery in 1988 including The Policeman’s Daughter 1987.

Many of these pictures relate to Rego’s relationship with her husband, the painter Victor Willing, who for many years suffered from multiple sclerosis and died in 1988.

Paula Rego Cast of Characters from Snow White 1996. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

Throughout her career, Rego has been fascinated with storytelling, the exhibition includes prints from her series Nursery Rhymes 1989 in which Rego explores the strangeness and cruelty of traditional British children’s songs.

As the first artist-in-residence at the National Gallery, Rego also took inspiration from art history, as in The Artist in Her Studio 1993.

The exhibition features Rego’s large pastels of single, female figures from the 1990s to 2000s, including the ‘Dog Woman’ and ‘Abortion’ series, some of the artist’s most celebrated and arresting pictures. Works from the ‘Abortion’ series, which the artist was proud to see used to campaign for the legalisation of abortion in Portugal, depict women in the aftermath of illegal abortions.

Paula Rego Possession I 2004 Collection Fundação de Serralves – Museu de Arte Contemporânea, Porto,
Portugal © Paula Rego

Possession 2004, another major series of pastels rarely exhibited, combines Rego’s personal experience of depression and therapy with inspiration from 19th century staged photographs of women diagnosed as suffering from ‘hysteria’.

Paula Rego The Pillowman 2004. Private Collection, London © Paula Rego

The exhibition includes scenes of the artist setting up, drawing and painting in her studio throughout the 2000s. Seminal paintings from this period include War 2003 and The Pillowman 2004. The exhibition also brings together striking works addressing the issues of women’s trafficking and female genital mutilation. These powerful images confront difficult stories of pain and abuse that Rego feels need to be told.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Tate to Reopen all its Galleries on 27 July 2020

Tate today announced that it plans to reopen all four of its galleries on 27 July 2020. People will once again be able to visit the national collection of art on display at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives.

Guided by the latest official advice, Tate is currently working hard on its preparations to welcome the public back to its galleries. To manage numbers and ensure everyone can keep a safe distance from each other, all visitors, including Members, will need to book a timed ticket online in advance. Tickets will be available from next week at tate.org.uk alongside the latest information and guidance on how to visit.

As well as the collection displays at all four Tate galleries, Tate Modern will reopen with Andy Warhol and Kara Walker’s Hyundai Commission Fons Americanus and Tate Britain will reopen with Aubrey Beardsley and Steve McQueen’s Year 3 installation.

As a result of the closure, some of Tate’s upcoming exhibition programme has been modified. This autumn, Tate Britain will open Turner’s Modern World and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, while Tate Modern will open Zanele Muholi and Bruce Nauman. Some exhibitions have been rescheduled to 2021, with new dates to be announced in due course. Talks, workshops, performances and film screenings will be replaced with a new programme of online events for the duration of this year.

TATE MODERN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

ANDY WARHOL
UNTIL 6 SEP 2020

HYUNDAI COMMISSION: KARA WALKER FONS AMERICANUS
UNTIL 8 NOV 2020

BRUCE NAUMAN
7 OCT 2020 – 21 FEB 2021

ZANELE MUHOLI
5 NOV 2020 – 14 MAR 2021

TATE BRITAIN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

AUBREY BEARDSLEY
UNTIL 20 SEP 2020

STEVE MCQUEEN YEAR 3
UNTIL 31 JAN 2021

TURNER’S MODERN WORLD
28 OCT 2020 – 7 MAR 2021

LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE
18 NOV 2020 – 9 MAY 2021

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – British Baroque: Power and Illusion at Tate Britain from 4 February to 19 April 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents a new exhibition which is the first exhibition to focus on baroque culture in Britain. The exhibition entitled British Baroque: Power and Illusion covers the period from the Restoration of Charles II in 1660 to the death of Queen Anne in 1714. The exhibition includes many new discoveries and works displayed in public for the first time, many on loan from the stately homes for which they were originally made.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The baroque is more often associated with the mainland European courts, like that of Louis XIV, but the movement also thrived in Britain but under very different circumstances. Whilst the European royal courts tried to outdo each other in extravagance and splendour, in Britain it was the Restoration that provided the opportunity to assert the power of the monarchy.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition begins by exploring art’s role in the construction of a renewed vision of monarchy, the room including portraits of Charles II by Sir Peter Lely and Antonio Verrio, dominating this room is Verrio’s The Sea Triumph of Charles II c.1674 which represents the king as a mythical hero.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lely was a popular painter with the King and the court, a series of portraits of court beauties by Lely is on display, including Barbara Villiers, Duchess of Cleveland with her son, as the Virgin and Child 1664. The Queen favoured the artist Jacob Huysmans who painted Catherine of Braganza c.1662-4, giving her a different visual identity from her husband.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition explores some of the issues related to the religious differences of the period, Protestant and Catholic worship dominated the period. On display are altarpieces from the Catholic chapels of Mary of Modena and James II and beautiful carvings by Grinling Gibbons and Thornhill’s designs for the painted dome of St Paul’s Cathedral.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One style that attracted the royal courts were the novelty of trompe l’oeil paintings, these visual illusions were very popular and the show including works by Samuel van Hoogstraten, Chatsworth’s famous violin painted as if hanging on the back of a door, and the hyper-real flower paintings of Simon Verelst.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Baroque architecture is represented with works by the great architects of the age: Wren, Hawksmoor and Vanbrugh. A number of architectural designs, lavish prints and wooden models provide insights into some of the most significant buildings of the age, such as St Paul’s Cathedral, Hampton Court Palace and Blenheim Palace.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

If the exteriors were spectacular, the painted baroque interiors of palaces, country houses and public buildings were on a scale seldom seen before with mythological and ancient history mural paintings by Antonio Verrio, Louis Laguerre, Louis Cheron and James Thornhill.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In all this splendour, the idea of beauty became a valuable quality for women, this is illustrated by Michael Dahl’s Petworth Beauties, a series of portraits of young women in their prime.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

War and politics dominated the reigns of William III and Anne. The exhibition includes a number of heroic equestrian portraiture and panoramic battle scenes that reinforced the idea of Britain being a major player on the European stage.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the final room, there is evidence of the shift in power from the royal court to party politics. Some of the new political elite is seen in Kneller’s depiction of the Whig Kit-Cat Club and John James Baker’s large group portrait The Whig Junto 1710.

This fascinating and unusual exhibition offers the opportunity to study British Baroque through outstanding paintings by the leading artists of the day, including Sir Peter Lely, Sir Godfrey Kneller and Sir James Thornhill. In many ways, British Baroque was a reaction against the dour puritan years of Cromwell’s reign and an assertion of the authority of the monarchy. However, all over Europe, the extravagance and decadence was to be a final act before revolution and political power changed this world forever. The grand buildings and large works of art may have expressed power and status at the time but to the modern viewer they represent elites out of touch with the reality of religious and political turmoil.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Mark Leckey: O’ Magic Power of Bleakness at Tate Britain from 24 September 2019 to 5 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents O’ Magic Power of Bleakness, a new exhibition by Mark Leckey, the artist has created an immersive installation combining new and existing works which unfold over time to create a son et lumière (sound and light) experience.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Leckey returns to the Tate Britain for the first time since he won the Turner Prize in 2008, the artist is known for his exploration of ideas of youth, class, memory and nostalgia.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

For this exhibition, Leckey fills the gallery space with a life-sized replica of a section of the M53, a motorway flyover close to his childhood home on the Wirral where he used to play with his friends. Underneath this bridge Leckey premieres a new audio-visual installation Under Under In 2019, inspired by a supernatural encounter he believed he had under the bridge as a child. The effect of this encounter is the bridge has become a recurring motif within his work. The ‘bridge’ becomes  a theatrical set with video projections and using a 19th-century illusion technique known as Pepper’s Ghost. Tied to the visual effects is  a new audio play that follows five teenagers under a haunted motorway bridge.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Alongside this new work, the exhibition also features large-scale projections of two of Leckey’s works: Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore 1990 and Dream English Kid, 1964 – 1999 AD 2015.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Leckey’s video Fiorucci is a compilation of footage from dance floors chronicling Britain’s underground club scene from the 1970s to the 1990s.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In Dream English Kid the artist’s personal memories are explored through material found online, inspired by his discovery of a YouTube video showing a Joy Division gig he attended as a teenager.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although all three works can be viewed as independent pieces, they do present a cycle of experiences that explore social history, memories, subcultures, experiences and digital technologies.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This thought provoking and unusual exhibition takes the visitor into a large dimly lit space with screens providing videos which bring together lives of mainly young people and some of the digital images they were constantly bombarded with by different media formats. As you watch the videos, it is noticeable that over time, the collective experience has changed to a more individual experience. This has profound consequences for society, the ties that once bound us all together are being unravelled in a cyberspace where even your individual identity and reality is being questioned.

The full running time of O’ Magic Power of Bleakness is approx. 55 minutes with a 5-minute interval between cycles. The work begins on the hour, every hour.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review: Frank Bowling at Tate Britain from 31 May to 26 August 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents the first major retrospective of work by Frank Bowling. This comprehensive exhibition spans the full range of Bowling’s six-decade career, bringing together rarely seen works and the artist’s best known works. Bowling was born in Guyana (then British Guiana) and moved to London in 1953. While serving in the RAF he met Keith Critchlow, who introduced him to the London art scene. Although Bowling was initially interested in poetry, he went on to study at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and R.B Kitaj and became the first Black artist nominated as a Royal Academician.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bowling’s early work reflected the political and social turmoil around him but he was always keen not to be pigeon holed in one particular genre. At this time the artist used figuration and abstraction in his work.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 1966, Bowling moved to New York and spent most of the following decade in the city. The large canvas of Bowling’s Variety Store 1967 provide evidence of the artist’s ability to use a number of different elements in his work.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gradually his work became more abstract, Ten of Bowling’s celebrated ‘Map Paintings’ created during this period are featured in the exhibition. These paintings comprise fields of colour overlaid with stenciled maps of the world which often allow Latin America and Africa dominate the canvas.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bowling in the 1970s began to experiment with ‘Poured Paintings’, in which the artist would pouring acrylic paint from different heights to create rivers of colour and fluidity.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The rooms in the exhibition entitled Cosmic Space and More Land than Landscape includes works that began to build texture on the canvas using a wide variety of objects.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is a change of pace in the Water and Light room in which Bowling in his Great Thames series combines his abstract paintings with light that is a reflection of his admiration for British landscape painters such as Turner and Constable.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The last two rooms called Layering and Stitching, and Explosive Experimentation illustrates that despite his advanced years, Bowling is still experimenting with stitching canvases together to create a variety of effects.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This attractive and enjoyable exhibition provides evidence that the work of Frank Bowling deserves greater recognition. The artist has always been considered something of an outsider in the art world. One of the possible reasons for this is the artist has been difficult to pin down to a particular school due to his constant experimentation. However a common theme throughout all is work is a vibrancy and dynamic use of colour. Even at 85, Bowling is still exploring with geometry and the fluidity of paint on canvas, this exhibition is a testament to Bowling’s confidence to find his own artistic voice  and his ability not to pander to fad and fashion.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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William Blake at Tate Britain from 11 September 2019 to 2 February 2020

This autumn, Tate Britain will present the largest survey of work by William Blake (1757-1827) in the UK for a generation. A visionary painter, printmaker and poet, Blake created some of the most iconic images in the history of British art and has remained an inspiration to artists, musicians, writers and performers worldwide for over two centuries. This exhibition will bring together over 300 remarkable and rarely seen works and rediscover Blake as a visual artist for the 21st century.

Tate Britain will reimagine the artist’s work as he intended it to be experienced. Blake’s art was a product of his tumultuous times, with revolution, war and progressive politics acting as the crucible of his unique imagination, yet he struggled to be understood and appreciated during his life.

Now renowned as a poet, Blake also had grand ambitions as a visual artist and envisioned vast frescos that were never realised. For the first time, The Spiritual Form of Nelson Guiding Leviathan c.1805-9 and The Spiritual Form of Pitt Guiding Behemoth c.1805 will be digitally enlarged and projected onto the gallery wall on the huge scale that Blake imagined. The original artworks will be displayed nearby in a restaging of Blake’s ill-fated exhibition of 1809, the artist’s only significant attempt to create a public reputation for himself as a painter. Tate will recreate the domestic room above his family hosiery shop in which the show was held, allowing visitors to encounter the paintings exactly as people did in 1809.

The exhibition will provide a vivid biographical framework in which to consider Blake’s life and work. There will be a focus on London, the city in which he was born and lived for most of his life. The burgeoning metropolis was a constant inspiration for the artist, offering an environment in which harsh realities and pure imagination were woven together. His creative freedom was also dependent on the unwavering support of those closest to him, his friends, family and patrons.

The exhibition will highlight the vital presence of his wife Catherine who offered both practical assistance and became an unacknowledged hand in the production of his engravings and illuminated books. The exhibition will showcase a series of illustrations to Pilgrim’s Progress 1824-27 and a copy of the book The complaint, and the consolation Night Thoughts 1797, now thought to be coloured by Catherine.

Tate Britain’s exhibition will open with Albion Rose c.1793, an exuberant visualisation of the mythical founding of Britain, created in contrast to the commercialisation, austerity and crass populism of the times. A section of the exhibition will also be dedicated to his illuminated books such as Songs of Innocence and of Experience 1794, his central achievement as a radical poet.

Additional highlights will include a selection of works from the Royal Collection and some of his best-known paintings including Newton 1795-c.1805 and Ghost of a Flea c.1819-20. This intricate work was inspired by a séance-induced vision and will be shown alongside a rarely seen preliminary sketch. The exhibition will close with The Ancient of Days 1827, a frontispiece for an edition of Europe: A Prophecy, completed only days before the artist’s death.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review : Van Gogh and Britain at Tate Britain from 27 March to 11 August 2019


Tate Britain presents a major exhibition about Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890). The exhibition entitled Van Gogh and Britain explores Van Gogh’s relationship with British art, literature and culture and how Van Gogh’s work inspired British artists like Walter Sickert, Frank Brangwyn, Matthew Smith, Jacob Epstein, David Bomberg and Francis Bacon.

The exhibition includes over 45 works by the artist from public and private collections around the world which is the largest group of Van Gogh paintings shown in the UK for nearly a decade. Van Gogh and Britain is the first exhibition of the artist’s work at Tate in over 70 years, when a blockbuster show in 1947 attracted record-breaking crowds. The exhibition was a phenomenon in London and went on to tour to Birmingham and Glasgow.

Some of the highlights include Self-Portrait 1889, L’Arlésienne 1890, Starry Night on the Rhône 1888, Shoes 1886 and the rarely loaned Sunflowers 1888 from the National Gallery in London. The exhibition also features late works including two painted by Van Gogh in the Saint-Paul asylum, At Eternity’s Gate 1890 and Prisoners Exercising 1890.

Van Gogh spent time in London between 1873 and 1876 and explored British culture during his stay. He admired works by John Constable and John Everett Millais and enjoyed British writers like William Shakespeare, Christina Rossetti and especially Charles Dickens. Despite this influence, his only image of London is the remarkable Prisoners Exercising, from Gustave Doré’s print of Newgate Prison.

The period in London was to influence Van Gogh in other way, his unrequited love for this landlady’s daughter led to change of character from relatively carefree to someone obsessed with religion. Dore’s work and Dickens played a major role in his development as an artist especially regarding subject matter. He wrote that ‘My whole life is aimed at making the things from everyday life that Dickens describes and these artists draw’.

The self portraits created during the 1880s show a man driven to capture the world around him with landscapes like Wheatfield Arles 1888, Autumn Landscape at Dusk Nuenen 1885, Avenue of Poplars in Autumn Nuenen 1884 and Olive Trees, St Remy 1889.

He also began to paint workers including Miners in the Snow Cuesmes 1880 and Loom with Weaver Nuenen 1884.

The Sorrowing old man 1890 gives some indication of the time when Van Gogh is descending into mental illness and ultimately his suicide.

Although Van Gogh died in relative obscurity, the Van Gogh exhibition of 1947 began to illustrate that people and artists attitudes were changing. The art works brightened up post war Britain when people were looking for a new beginning after the tragedy of the war. Modern British artists like Matthew Smith, Christopher Wood and David Bomberg saw new possibilities with their art and Francis Bacon saw himself like Van Gogh, the embattled, misunderstood artist, an art outsider.

This fascinating exhibition is a reminder of the often cruel twist of fate that befall artists. Van Gogh commits suicide because of his lack of success and recognition. Over 100 years later, Van Gogh is one of the most famous artists in the world and his paintings sell for millions. This exhibition provides the opportunity to understand the role that Britain played in that transformation. The influence of Dore and Dickens were considerable but it is the remarkable intensity and dynamism of some of the paintings that generally appeal to a modern audience. The exhibition of 1947 was a turning point for the appreciation of Van Gogh in the UK, this exhibition confirms his status as one of the great artists.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

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Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Exhibition Review : Edward Burne-Jones at Tate Britain from 24 October 2018 to 24 February 2019

Tate Britain presents the largest Edward Burne-Jones retrospective to be held in the UK for a generation. Edward Burne-Jones is best known for his ties to the Pre-Raphaelites and his symbolist works of myths and legends. The exhibition brings together over 150 works in different media including painting, stained glass and tapestry and includes work created working for William Morris. Burne-Jones was born in Birmingham and whilst at Oxford became friends with William Morris who were both influenced by Gabriel Rossetti. Burne-Jones had intended to enter the church but was persuaded by Rossetti to become an artist.

The exhibition begins by looking at Burne-Jones relationship with Rossetti, its was the artist-poet who encouraged him and found him support from fellow artists and patrons. Works here include two stain glass windows related to Chaucer’s ‘Goode Wimmin’, The Wine of Circe and The Lament.

Rossetti was very impressed by Burne-Jones draughtsmanship and the second room entitled ‘Burne-Jones as a Draughtsman’ includes many of his drawings including Desiderium.

From 1877, Burne-Jones began to exhibit his paintings at the new Grosvenor Gallery that was seen as an alternative to the Royal Academy, some of his most popular pictures were Love among the Ruins, The Wheel of Fortune and The Golden Stairs.

Room four features a number of portraits, a number of familiar faces appear in these portraits including his wife Georgina and his daughter Margaret. Other portraits include paintings of Amy Gaskell and Lady Windsor.

From 1875, Burne-Jones worked on a number of paintings as part of a narrative cycle concerning myths and legends, the exhibition includes the Perseus Series and the Briar Rose series.

The Briar Rose series based on the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale were especially popular with critics and general public.

The final room looks at ‘Burne-Jones as Designer’ and his influence on decorative arts at the end of the 19th century. Burne-Jones worked in a number of different media including painting, stained glass, tapestry, embroidery, furniture and book illustration. His work for Morris and Co was highly valued especially his many designs for stained glass windows. In this room is the remarkable Graham Piano 1879-80, embroideries, illustrated books and spectacular large-scale tapestries like The Arming and Departure of the Knights of the Round Table on the Quest for the Holy Grail 1890-1894 and Adoration of the Magi 1894.

This fascinating exhibition explores the work and legacy of an artist who is often associated with the Pre-Raphaelites and Symbolist movements. The exhibition suggests that Burne-Jones is one of the most influential British artists of the 19th century and walking around the exhibition it would be difficult to suggest that this is not the case. However his pursuit of ‘beauty’ in art was often at odds with the social realism movements at the turn of the twentieth century. Without doubt, his draughtsmanship was widely admired by many and unlike many of his contemporaries, he did achieve world-wide fame and recognition in his life-time. Edward Burne-Jones works did touch a chord with sections of Victorian society who loved the escapism of his enchanted worlds inhabited by beautiful and melancholy beings. For much of the 20th century, his work has been overlooked, this exhibition is a reminder of the range and scope of his work and highlights his distinct and original approach to painting and decorative arts.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here