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London Sculptures: The Young Lovers by Georg Ehrlich in the Festival Gardens in London


© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Two Lovers statue by Georg Ehrlich features a young man and woman joined in an embrace in Festival Gardens with a dramatic backdrop of St Paul’s Cathedral. It was installed in the garden in 1973.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Georg Ehrlich was a Austrian sculptor who was born and studied in Vienna, during the First World War he served in the Austrian Army. After short stays in Munich and Berlin. he began to get some recognition for his etchings and lithographs. But returned to Vienna in 1924, and began to concentrate on building a career as a sculptor.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 1930 he married the artist Bettina Bauer. After the rise of the Nazi’s, Ehrlich decided that it was too dangerous for them to be in Austria and they moved to London. Ehrlich became a British citizen in 1947 and was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy in 1962.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Ehrlich’s work was shown at the Venice Biennale in 1932, 1934, 1936 and 1958 and he won a gold medal at the Paris World Exposition in 1937.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The artist has works in the Tate Gallery, British Museum and Victoria and Albert Museum. He died in Switzerland in 1966 and was buried in Vienna.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Hidden London: The Panyer Boy in Panyer Alley

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

London is the type of city where you find the most unusual objects in the strangest places. This is most certainly the case with The Panyer Boy in Panyer Alley.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Next to St Paul’s underground station and on the wall next to a Caffe Nero coffee shop is a stone plaque of a boy sitting on a basket with written underneath ‘When you have sought the city round, Yet still this is the highest ground. August 27, 1688.’

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The plaque has been the source of mystery for centuries and has been moved to various locations in Panyer Alley as buildings have been pulled down and replaced.

Panyer Alley is located near St Paul’s Cathedral and was first mentioned in the 15th century. One of London’s early historians, John Stow in his Survey of London published in 1598 mentions the location.

At the west end of this parish church is a small passage for people on foot through the same church; and west from the said church, some distance, is another passage out of Pater Noster row, and is called, of such a sign, Panyar alley, which cometh out into the north over against St. Martin’s lane.

We do not what sign that Stow is alluding too but other sources suggest that Panyer Alley got its name from a dwelling house with outbuildings and land called the “Panyer,” or” the Panyer on the hoope”. Some have suggested this might be an Inn or tavern.

We do know that Samuel Pepys frequented the Alley in 1666 when he was looking for some stationary services.

The Diary of Samuel Pepys

13th April 1666

Thence called upon an old woman in Pannier Ally to agree for ruling of some paper for me and she will do it pretty cheap.

Monday 16 April 1666

Then I left them to come to me at supper anon, and myself out by coach to the old woman in Pannier Alley for my ruled papers, and they are done.

This was before the Great Fire of London in September 1666 which destroyed St Paul’s and large parts of the City of London. It is possible that in the rebuilding work after the fire that the plaque was attached to a new building with the boast of this being the highest spot.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

John Strype updating Stow’s Survey of London in 1720 noticed something new in Panyer Alley.

When you have sought the City round,
Yet still this is the highest Ground.
August 26. 1688.

This is writ upon a Stone raised, about the middle of this Panier Alley; having the Figure of a Panier, with a Boy sitting upon it, with a Bunch of Grapes, as it seems to be, held between his naked Foot and Hand: in token, perhaps, of Plenty.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This is one of the first mention of the Panyer Boy and provides some idea of its location. The mystery of Panyer Boy has led to a number of theories. Many people have made the connection with the name of the alley and the basket the boy seems to be sitting on. Pannier derives from the Old French panier, meaning ‘bread basket’.

Stow mentions that nearby Bread Street has long been associated with bakers.

Then is Bread street itself, so called of bread in old time there sold; for it appeareth by records, that in the year 1302, which was the 30th of Edward I., the bakers of London were bound to sell no bread in their shops or houses, but in the market, and that they should have four hallmotes in the year, at four several terms, to determine of enormities belonging to the said company. (John Stow, Survey of London).

A newspaper report of 1893 mentions that some people had their eye on the Panyer Boy.

A wealthy American is said to have offered a workman £50 to procure for him the Panyer Stone in Panyer Alley, Newgate-street, which for two centuries has marked the highest point of the City of London. The workman, who was engaged in pulling down the old warehouse in which the stone is fixed, informed the city authorities, and now a guard is placed upon the relic.

The real mystery is how the plaque has survived over 330 years of political turmoil, bombing and buildings being pulled down and redeveloped. It has certainly led a charmed life and although ignored by thousands as they pass by, for some Londoners it is part of the fascination of the capital.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Review: The London Landmarks Half Marathon 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A month before the London Marathon, runners had the opportunity of racing around the capital’s streets with the second London Landmarks Half Marathon organised by baby charity Tommy’s.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A warm spring morning bought out around 13,000 runners and an estimated 50,000 spectators on the 13-mile course that runs through the heart of London.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The route passes 12 key landmarks and numerous other places of interest including Nelson’s Column, Big Ben, the London Eye, St Paul’s Cathedral, Bank of England and the Tower of London. Runners start at Pall Mall, before ending up at Downing Street in Whitehall to collect their coveted medals.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Alongside the many thousands of runners, a number of celebrities will also be attempting the 13.1 mile course, including Call the Midwife actress Jennifer Kirby, TV presenter Jenni Falconer, Radio 1 broadcaster Cel Spellman and Britain’s Got Talent judge Amanda Holden.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

To keep the runners and spectators entertained there are lots of cheer stations featuring choirs, bands, dance acts and DJs.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Like the London Marathon, many of the runners are running for a variety of charities and last year the inurgral event raised over 4 million pounds.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The London Landmarks Half Marathon is already a firm favourite with runners, many who will be returning at the end of April to take on the London Marathon.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review: Prudential RideLondon FreeCycle in London – 28th July 2018

This weekend, cyclists take over the streets of London with the sixth edition of Prudential RideLondon which is considered the world’s greatest festival of cycling. Over the weekend of 28-29 July 2018, there will be a large number of events all over the capital.

Like the London Marathon, there is the excitement of watching the world’s best professional cyclists race in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey Classic and Prudential RideLondon Classique. However, amateur cyclists can participate in the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 – a 100-mile challenge on the same closed roads as the professionals or they can ride the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 46 – a 46-mile sportive created specifically for newer and also younger cyclists.

The weekend started off more sedately with Prudential RideLondon FreeCycle which offers riders a wonderful opportunity to experience the fun and freedom of cycling on traffic-free roads in central London.

The event showcases the capital as part of a festival of cycling with the route open from 09:00-16:00 and takes in the Strand and Lincoln’s Inn Fields and returns to the Victoria Embankment, taking in a section of the newly opened East-West Cycle Superhighway (CS3).

The eight-mile circuit passes iconic London landmarks including Buckingham Palace, Trafalgar Square, St Paul’s Cathedral and the Bank of England and again goes south of the river with a loop over Waterloo Bridge, offering views of London.

More than 70,000 cyclists enjoyed the traffic-free roads of central London in 2017 and it is expected this year will see even more cyclists along the route.

If riders want to take a break from the cycling, there is plenty of entertainment at the Festival Zones in Southbank, Guildhall Yard, Leadenhall Market, St Paul’s Churchyard, Aldwych, Lincoln’s Inn Fields and Green Park. At the zones there are a wide range of bike-based entertainment and activities throughout the day.

In Green Park, top stunt rider Andrei Burton and his world class team of male and female champions take on the world championship standard course which includes a series of replica iconic buildings as obstacles.

Interest in cycling has grown and grown in the last decade and the Prudential RideLondon is a great festival of cycling with a large number of events and attractions. Like the London Marathon there is something for everyone and is a wonderful day out for everyone especially families.

For more information , visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

The Remarkable Story of the Temple Bar

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Standing near to St Paul’s Cathedral, mostly ignored by visitors is an arch that has a remarkable history. The arch is known as the Temple Bar and was commissioned by King Charles II, and designed by Sir Christopher Wren. Constructed from Portland Stone between 1669 and 1672 it occupied one of the most important locations in London, separating the  City of London and the City of Westminster.

This location was the point where Fleet Street becomes the Strand, a site now near the Royal Courts of Justice, it was at this spot that a Temple Bar stood from the 13th century. Originally just a wooden structure with a chain, it possessed considerable symbolic importance. Temple Bar was the  scene of a large number of historical pageants celebrating coronations and paying homage to dead Kings and Queens, through the Temple Bar passed Henry V, Anne Boleyn, Edward VI and  Mary Tudor. Before Queen Elizabeth the first’s  coronation, Gogmagog the Albion, and Corineus the Briton, the two Guildhall giants, stood next to the Bar.

In the late Middle Ages a wooden archway stood on the spot and although it escaped damage in the Great Fire of London , it was decided  by the City to rebuild the structure.

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The Wren designed Temple Bar is constructed in two stories with  one wide central arch for the road traffic, flanked on both sides by narrower arches for pedestrians.
During the 18th century, the heads of traitors were mounted on pikes and exhibited on the roof and  upper story room was leased to the neighbouring banking-house of Child and Co for records storage.

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Temple Bar, London, 1878 by A & J Bool

In 1878 the City of London Corporation decided that the arch was becoming a bottleneck for traffic and decided to dismantle the structure. It dismantled it piece-by-piece over an 11-day period and the Corporation stored the 2,700 stones. In 1880, at the instigation of his wife, Valerie Meux, the brewer Henry Meux bought the stones and re-erected the arch as a gateway at his house, Theobalds Park in Hertfordshire. Lady Meux used it to entertain friends but after she died, it became derelict and abandoned  until 2003.

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Temple bar at Theobolds Park (Photo M Newnham 1968)

In 1984, it was purchased by the Temple Bar Trust from the Meux Trust for £1. It was carefully dismantled and returned on 500 pallets to the City of London, where it was painstakingly re-erected as an entrance to the Paternoster Square redevelopment just north of St Paul’s Cathedral. It opened to the public on the 10 November 2004.

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London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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A Short Guide to St Paul’s Cathedral

St Paul’s Cathedral occupies a special place in the English identity especially in the Second World War when it managed to survive the Blitz and became a symbol of resistance.

There has been a Cathedral on this site since AD 604, The present Cathedral built in a English baroque style by famous architect Sir Christopher Wren is at least the fourth to have stood on the site. It was built between 1675 and 1710, after its predecessor was destroyed in the Great Fire of London.

St Paul’s Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral, the seat of the Bishop of London and the mother church of the Diocese of London. The cathedral has been at the centre of many famous events including the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington, Sir Winston Churchill and Margaret Thatcher; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; and the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer.

At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London for many centuries and its dome is among the highest in the world.

St Paul’s has a large number of memorials and artworks including William Holman Hunt’s copy of his painting The Light of the World, in the north choir aisle is a sculpture of the Madonna and Child by Henry Moore, carved in 1943. The largest monument in the cathedral is the memorial to the Duke of Wellington. The tomb of Horatio, Lord Nelson is located in the crypt, next to that of Wellington. At the eastern end of the crypt is the Chapel of the Order of the British Empire, instigated in 1917, and designed by Lord Mottistone.There are many other memorials commemorating the British military, including several lists of servicemen who died in action, the most recent being the Gulf War.

Also remembered are Florence Nightingale, J. M. W. Turner, Hubert Parry, Samuel Johnson, Lawrence of Arabia and Sir Alexander Fleming as well as clergy and residents of the local parish. There are lists of the Bishops and cathedral Deans for the last thousand years. One of the most remarkable sculptures is that of the Dean and poet, John Donne.

St Paul’s Cathedral is a busy church with three or four services every day, including Matins, Eucharist and Evening Prayer or Evensong. In addition, the Cathedral has many special services associated with the City of London, its corporation, guilds and institutions. The cathedral, as the largest church in London, also has a role in many state functions such as the service celebrating the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. The cathedral is generally open daily to tourists, and has a regular program of organ recitals and other performances.

The price of admission includes entry to the Cathedral floor, crypt and the three galleries in the dome. Admission also includes multimedia guides and guided tours (for individuals and family visitors, subject to guide availability on the day).

Sightseeing opening hours – Monday to Saturday

8.30am  Doors open for sightseeing
9.30am  Galleries open to visitors
4pm  Last tickets
4.15pm  Last entry to galleries
4.30pm  Doors close for sightseeing
Most visitors spend in the region of 1.5 – 2 hours inside St Paul’s.
On Sunday the Cathedral is open for worship only.

Filming and photography is not allowed inside the Cathedral, but is permitted on the external galleries, without tripods, on a non-commercial basis.

Special services or events may occasionally close all, or part, of the Cathedral.

For more information or book tickets, visit the St Paul’s Cathedral website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here