Home » Posts tagged 'Sir Simon Rattle.'

Tag Archives: Sir Simon Rattle.

London Symphony Orchestra 2018/19 season at the Barbican

The London Symphony Orchestra and its Music Director Sir Simon Rattle open their 2018/19 season at the Barbican with a programme affirming a continuing commitment to British music new and old on 16 Sep 2018 in the Barbican Hall. The concert features a world premiere by Sir Harrison Birtwistle, a defining figure in British music since the 1950s, Mark-Anthony Turnage’s 1995 work Dispelling the Fears, Holst’s masterpiece Egdon Heath, and Britten’s Spring Symphony. It is the first concert in an ambitious 51-concert season which runs to the end of Jun 2019 and explores in a broad defining concept the roots, origins and the future of music.

Simon Rattle conducts 16 concerts which explore the impact that different cultural traditions have had on music, from Eastern European folk music, through the British folk traditions in Grainger and Vaughan Williams, and on to the extraordinary impact of jazz. Gianandrea Noseda explores Russian identity in music, whilst continuing his cycle of Shostakovich’s symphonies, and conducts a Strauss programme featuring the soprano Diana Damrau in the final act of his last opera Capriccio.

François-Xavier Roth looks at the extraordinary spread of music traditions from Europe at the turn of the 20th Century, and in one concert, three composers from the central European tradition who were each in the vanguard of modern music in their time, Haydn, Bartók and Ligeti. Roth also heads up the third edition of LSO Futures, the Orchestra’s new music festival which is centred around the young composers taking part in the LSO’s new music development programmes, and also features David Lang’s Public Domain, written for 1000 community voices and performed in the Barbican foyers.

Michael Tilson Thomas, and Sir Mark Elder each explore American identity with music by the maverick Charles Ives, and Sir John Eliot Gardiner continues his Schumann retrospective with his completely fresh take on Romanticism. Verdi and Puccini are brought together with Ponchielli when Sir Antonio Pappano conducts non-operatic works by these three operatic giants and Barbara Hannigan is conductor and soprano in a programme featuring Berg’s Lulu Suite and music from Gershwin’s musical Girl Crazy alongside works by Haydn and Ligeti. Hannigan is also the soloist in Hans Abrahamsen’s Let me tell you, which is conducted by Simon Rattle in Jan 2019.

The 15th Donatella Flick Conducting Competition will take place in Nov 2018 when conductors aged 30 and under compete for a cash prize and the position of Assistant Conductor with the LSO. The Competition’s final round, featuring violinist Vadim Repim, will be live-streamed from the Barbican for the first time on Medici.tv and YouTube. Bernard Haitink celebrates his 90th birthday conducting the LSO in Mahler and Bruckner in Dec 2018 and the LSO’s concerts marking the Leonard Bernstein Centenary come to a close in Dec, when Marin Alsop conducts two performances of Bernstein’s Candide, on the same stage where Bernstein himself conducted the work in 1989 with the LSO. The LSO’s Half Six Fix series which presents short, early-evening concerts will continue with four concerts this season, and there is a wealth of activity at LSO St Luke’s, the Orchestra’s music education and community centre.

The season ends in Jun 2019, with the return of the artistic partnership of Simon Rattle and the director Peter Sellars with two staged performances of Janáček’s opera The Cunning Little Vixen.

For more information , visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Sir Simon Rattle and the London Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican – 30th June 2016

rattle

For the closing concert of the 15/16 season Sir Simon Rattle conducts a programme exploring the pivotal works of three composers who each innovated in vastly different ways: Ives, Beethoven and Rachmaninov.

Ives’ The Unanswered Question is an American classic that ruminates on the ‘perennial question of existence’. Ever the progressive, Ives’ work divides his ensemble into three independent groups each playing their own distinctive music. Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No 4 broke all concerto conventions when it was first performed, opening with a simple piano solo. Rachmaninov’s Symphony No 2 re-invigorated the genre; his insistence on looking back to classical models allowed him to stand out at a time when composers were becoming increasingly obsessed with modernity.

Programme

Ives The Unanswered Question

Beethoven Piano Concerto No 4

Rachmaninov Symphony No 2

Performers

Sir Simon Rattle conductor

Krystian Zimerman piano

London Symphony Orchestra

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

All you need to know about The BBC Proms 2016 : 15th July to 10th September 2016

rah_2016

The BBC Proms 2016 is one of the largest global classical music festivals with over 90 concerts  as well as a number of other events.

Highlights for the 2016 season include concerts featuring world-famous conductors like Gustavo Dudamel, Sir Simon Rattle, Vladimir Jurowski, Valery Gergiev, Sir Andrew Davis, Bernard Haitink, Thomas Adès and Daniel Barenboim.

The Proms attracts some of the finest orchestras and this year will include Munich Philharmonic Orchestra, Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra, Halle, West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic and Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela.

Although classed as a classical music festival, the Proms features a wide range of music especially in the late night Proms, this year will feature Quincy Jones, a tribute to David Bowie, John Wilson Orchestra will be performing the best of Ira Gershwin, A celebration of Latin American music and A night of Gospel music. There are Proms that feature the dance music from Strictly Come Dancing, Bryn Terfel will be performing the title role in Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov, all three of Stravinsky’s landmark ballets for the Ballet Russes will be performed over one weekend, a season of music inspired by Shakespeare, marking 400 years since the playwright’s death and Ten cello concertos, starting with Elgar’s Cello Concerto performed by Sol Gabetta on the First Night.

A Brief History of the Proms

This is the 120th year of the Proms and tries to stay true to its original aim: to present the widest possible range of music, performed to the highest standards, to large audiences.

Proms were originally ‘promenade concerts.’ These were outdoor music performances during which the audience could walk (or ‘promenade’) around. The first Proms concert took place on 10 August 1895 and was created by Robert Newman, manager of the newly built Queen’s Hall in London.

Newman was keen to reach a wider audience by offering more popular programmes, adopting a less formal promenade arrangement, and keeping ticket prices low. He recruited Henry Wood to be the first conductor of the first Proms season and both Newman and Wood decided offer a mixture of popular and adventurous works. Financial problems threatened to end the Proms following the First World War until the newly formed BBC took over the running of the event. The BBC began to broadcast the concerts and significantly widened its appeal, and although there were financial problems during the Second World War have promoted the Proms ever since. One of the major changes was when the Queen’s Hall was destroyed by bombing in 1941 , the event was switched to the Royal Albert Hall where it has remained till the present day.

Promming

One of most unusual aspects of the Proms is the large amount of tickets available to people who wish to stand, the popular tradition of Promming (standing in the Arena or Gallery areas of the Royal Albert Hall) is central to its unique and informal atmosphere.

Up to 1,400 standing places are available for each Proms concert at the Royal Albert Hall. The traditionally low prices allow you to enjoy world-class performances for just £6.00 each (or even less with a Season Ticket or Weekend Promming Pass). All spaces are unreserved.

Over 500 Arena and Gallery tickets (priced £6.00) are available for every Prom. These tickets are available on the day and cannot be booked in advance, so even if all seats have been sold, you always have a good chance of getting in (although early queuing is advisable for the more popular concerts). You must buy your ticket in person and must pay by cash.

A limited number of Arena tickets will usually be sold to the Day Queue from two and a half hours before each performance. For Arena tickets join the queue on the west side of the South Steps. The remaining Day Promming tickets will then be sold from Door 11 for the Arena and Door 10 for the Gallery (queue along Bremmer Road) from 45 minutes before the performance. Tickets for Late Night Proms are available only on the doors, from 30 minutes before the performance. Arena and Gallery tickets are available only at Door 11 and Door 10, not at the Box Office.

If you are unable to get tickets for a popular Prom, be aware that returns often become available. In addition, many boxes and some seats at the Royal Albert Hall are privately owned, and these seats may be returned for general sale in the period leading up to the concert. The Royal Albert Hall does not operate a waiting list.

Last Night of the Proms

The final concert in the series is the Last Night of the Proms  which is very popular and has it own ticketing method.

The majority of tickets for the Last Night of the Proms will be allocated by ballot to customers who have bought tickets to at least five other Proms concerts at the Royal Albert Hall. A further 200 tickets are allocated by the Open Ballot.

The Five-Concert Ballot closes on  26 May and you will be informed by 3rd of June whether or not you have been successful.

The Open Ballot

One hundred Centre Stalls seats  and 100 Front Circle seats for the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall will be allocated by Open Ballot. The Open Ballot takes place on 1st July and successful applicants will be contacted by 9th July.

Any tickets not allocated by the Five-Concert Ballot or the Open Ballot will go on sale on 7th July. There is exceptionally high demand for Last Night tickets, but returns occasionally become available, so it is always worth checking with the Box Office.

Promming at the Last Night.

Day Prommers and Weekend Promming Pass-holders who have attended five or more other concerts (in either the Arena or the Gallery) are eligible to purchase one ticket each for the Last Night (priced £6.00) on presentation of their used tickets (which will be retained) at the Box Office.

On the Night A limited number of standing tickets are available on the Last Night itself (priced £6.00, one per person). No previous ticket purchases are necessary. Just join the queue on The Queen’s Steps, east side (Arena), or the top of Bremner Road, north side (Gallery), and you may well be lucky.

If you are not fortunate to secure Last Night of the Proms tickets  there are a number of celebrations at venues around the UK. Known generally as Proms in the Park the events are held in London, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Each show is centred around a live concert with its own high-profile artists, BBC orchestras and presenters. The evening culminates in a live big-screen link-up to the Royal Albert Hall for the traditional singalong.

If you want to find further information about the Proms or book tickets , visit the Proms website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Sir Simon Rattle conducts Bruckner at the Royal Festival Hall – 22nd April 2016

prom 75

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Principal Artist Sir Simon Rattle joins the  OAE’s 30th birthday celebrations at the Royal Festival Hall.

Having been associated with the Orchestra almost since its inception, Sir Simon Rattle leads the Orchestra in a performance of Bruckner.

Although Bruckner’s Sixth Symphony is considered one of his lighter works, it maintains the depth and majesty that are associated with many of his compositions.

It is accompanied by the Mahler-like Scherzo from Symphony in E by Hans Rott, a composer who studied organ with Bruckner himself.

Programme

Johannes Brahms: Tragic Overture

Hans Rott: Scherzo from Symphony in E

Interval

Anton Bruckner: Symphony No.6

Performers

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

Sir Simon Rattle conductor

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Southbank website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Debussy Pelléas et Mélisande at the Barbican – 9th and 10 January 2016

pelleas

An innovative new production of Debussy’s evocative opera Pelléas et Mélisande, produced in collaboration by two of the boldest creative minds in music and theatre today.

This concert sees long-term collaborators and Barbican regulars Sir Simon Rattle and Peter Sellars, return to Debussy’s iconic opera for the first time since their ground-breaking re-imagining over two decades ago. This all-new semi-staged production co-promoted by the London Symphony Orchestra and Barbican promises to confound all pre-conceptions, and will undoubtedly cast an exciting new light on Debussy’s sensuous score.

Programme 

Debussy Pelléas et Mélisande (semi-staged performance)

Performers

Sir Simon Rattle conductor

Peter Sellars director

Ben Zamora lighting installation

Magdalena Kožená Melisande

Christian Gerhaher Pelléas

Gerald Finley Golaud

Bernarda Fink Genevieve

Franz-Josef Selig Arkel

London Symphony Chorus

Simon Halsey chorus director

London Symphony Orchestra

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Sir Simon Rattle and the London Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican – 13th January 2016

rattle

Sir Simon Rattle conducts an evocative programme showcasing French music composed on the cusp of modernity, featuring masterful works by three pre-eminent French composers.

French repertoire is characterised by its unique sense of clarity and balance coupled with an innate sense of craftsmanship, as a conductor Rattle embodies these very same ideals. His approach to this repertoire matches that of the composers themselves, lavishing care and attention on every note.

Delage’s rarely heard Four Hindu Poems, is a set of sparse, jewel-like miniatures for small ensemble and soprano which forms the centrepiece of this programme. It is set alongside masterpieces by Ravel and Dutilleux, including Dutilleux’s exalted violin concerto L’arbre des songes (Tree of Dreams), performed by Leonidas Kavakos, and Ravel’s Daphnis and Chloe Suite No 2, which the composer described as a ‘symphonie choreographique’.

Programme 

Ravel Le tombeau de Couperin

Dutilleux L’arbre des songes

Delage Four Hindu Poems

Dutilleux Métaboles

Ravel Daphnis and Chloe – Suite No 2

Performers

Sir Simon Rattle conductor

Leonidas Kavakos violin

Julia Bullock soprano

London Symphony Orchestra

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

 

All you need to know about The Proms : 17th July to 12th September 2015

header_image_2014
A Brief History of the Proms

This is the 120th year of the Proms and tries to stay true to its original aim: to present the widest possible range of music, performed to the highest standards, to large audiences.
Proms were originally ‘promenade concerts.’ These were outdoor music performances during which the audience could walk (or ‘promenade’) around. The first Proms concert took place on 10 August 1895 and was created by Robert Newman, manager of the newly built Queen’s Hall in London.

Newman was keen to reach a wider audience by offering more popular programmes, adopting a less formal promenade arrangement, and keeping ticket prices low. He recruited Henry Wood to be the first conductor of the first Proms season and both Newman and Wood decided offer a mixture of popular and adventurous works. Financial problems threatened to end the Proms following the First World War until the newly formed BBC took over the running of the event. The BBC began to broadcast the concerts and significantly widened its appeal, and although there were financial problems during the Second World War have promoted the Proms ever since. One of the major changes was when the Queen’s Hall was destroyed by bombing in 1941 , the event was switched to the Royal Albert Hall where it has remained till the present day.

opera singer

The Proms 2015

The Proms is one of the largest global classical music festivals with over 75 concerts  as well as a number of other events.

Highlights for the 2015 season include concerts featuring world-famous conductors Sir Andrew Davis, Bernard Haitink, Daniel Barenboim and Sir Simon Rattle. The Proms attracts some of the finest orchestra’s and this year will include St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic, Danish National Symphony Orchestra and West-Eastern Divan Orchestra.

Although classed as a classical music festival, the Proms features a wide range of music especially in the late night Proms, this year will feature Bollywood and bhangra music, Urban, dance music and the John Wilson Orchestra performs Frank Sinatra. There are Proms that feature the Story of Swing, Bernstein – Stage and Screen, Bryn Terfel will leads the cast in a production of Fiddler on the Roof and Sir David Attenborough presents a Prom exploring composer Murray Gold’s music for the  BBC TV series ‘Life Story’.

One of most unusual aspects of the Proms is the large amount of tickets available to people who wish to stand, the popular tradition of Promming (standing in the Arena or Gallery areas of the Royal Albert Hall) is central to its unique and informal atmosphere.

Up to 1,400 standing places are available for each Proms concert at the Royal Albert Hall. The traditionally low prices allow you to enjoy world-class performances for just £5.00 each (or even less with a Season Ticket or Weekend Promming Pass). All spaces are unreserved.

Over 500 Arena and Gallery tickets (priced £5.00) are available for every Prom. These tickets are available on the day and cannot be booked in advance, so even if all seats have been sold, you always have a good chance of getting in (although early queuing is advisable for the more popular concerts). You must buy your ticket in person and must pay by cash.

A limited number of Arena tickets will usually be sold to the Day Queue from two and a half hours before each performance. For Arena tickets join the queue on the west side of the South Steps. The remaining Day Promming tickets will then be sold from Door 11 for the Arena and Door 10 for the Gallery (queue along Bremmer Road) from 45 minutes before the performance. Tickets for Late Night Proms are available only on the doors, from 30 minutes before the performance. Arena and Gallery tickets are available only at Door 11 and Door 10, not at the Box Office.

If you are unable to get tickets for a popular Prom, be aware that returns often become available. In addition, many boxes and some seats at the Royal Albert Hall are privately owned, and these seats may be returned for general sale in the period leading up to the concert. The Royal Albert Hall does not operate a waiting list.

somethingelse

Last Night of the Proms

The final concert in the series is the Last Night of the Proms  which is very popular and has it own ticketing method.

The majority of tickets for the Last Night of the Proms will be allocated by ballot to customers who have bought tickets to at least five other Proms concerts at the Royal Albert Hall. A further 200 tickets are allocated by the Open Ballot.

The Five-Concert Ballot closes on  28 May and you will be informed by 5th of June whether or not you have been successful.

The Open Ballot
One hundred Centre Stalls seats  and 100 Front Circle seats for the Last Night of the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall will be allocated by Open Ballot. The Open Ballot takes place on 3rd July and successful applicants will be contacted by 9th July.

Any tickets not allocated by the Five-Concert Ballot or the Open Ballot will go on sale on 9th July. There is exceptionally high demand for Last Night tickets, but returns occasionally become available, so it is always worth checking with the Box Office.

Promming at the Last Night.

Day Prommers and Weekend Promming Pass-holders who have attended five or more other concerts (in either the Arena or the Gallery) are eligible to purchase one ticket each for the Last Night (priced £5.00) on presentation of their used tickets (which will be retained) at the Box Office.

On the Night A limited number of standing tickets are available on the Last Night itself (priced £5.00, one per person). No previous ticket purchases are necessary. Just join the queue on The Queen’s Steps, east side (Arena), or the top of Bremner Road, north side (Gallery), and you may well be lucky.

If you are not fortunate to secure Last Night of the Proms tickets  there are a number of celebrations at venues around the UK. Known generally as Proms in the Park the events are held in London, Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland. Each show is centred around a live concert with its own high-profile artists, BBC orchestras and presenters. The evening culminates in a live big-screen link-up to the Royal Albert Hall for the traditional singalong.

If you want to find further information about the Proms or book tickets , visit the Proms website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here