Home » Posts tagged 'Royal Academy'

Tag Archives: Royal Academy

Exhibition Review: Picasso and Paper at the Royal Academy from 25 January to 13 April 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents an exhibition entitled Picasso and Paper which is the most comprehensive exhibition devoted to Picasso’s imaginative and original uses of paper ever to be held. The exhibition brings together over 300 works and covers Picasso’s remarkable 80-year career, the exhibition illustrates the ways in which the artist worked both on and with paper, and provides new insights into this little known aspect of the artist’s work.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) is considered one of the most important artists of the 20th century and he worked in a large range of mediums including painting, sculpture, ceramics and graphic arts.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition is organised chronologically and explores all stages of Picasso’s career working with paper and features works like Women at Their Toilette, winter 1937-38, which is exhibited in the UK for the first time in over 50 years; Cubist papiers-collés such as Violin, 1912; studies for his famous work Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features many of Picasso’s drawings, including Self-portrait, 1918 and Seated Woman (Dora), 1938.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a number of drawings, displayed alongside closely related paintings and sculptures. La Vie, 1903 , is displayed with preparatory drawings. Picasso’s Cubist bronze Head of a Woman (Fernande), 1909 is exhibited together with associated drawings. The large sculpture, Man with a Sheep, 1943 is displayed together with a group of large ink and wash drawings.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All through the exhibition is evidence of the enormous range of Picasso’s experimental work over the course of his career. Woodcuts printed by hand, photograms made with Dora Maar and later with André Villers, designs for the ballet, experimental graphic designs and illustrated books.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Within the exhibition is a room showing the film Le Mystère Picasso of 1955, a documentary showing the artist drawing with with felt-tip pens, some of those original drawings are on show.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The closing section focuses on Picasso’s last decade which focuses on his work as a printmaker. Drawings, prints and copper plates are displayed near Picasso’s printing press from the period.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This remarkable and fascinating exhibition offers people the opportunity to understand the creative genius of Pablo Picasso in all its guises. Whilst many people will be familiar with certain aspects of the artist’s career, very rarely do you see the full range of his talent. His relentless and dynamic creativity and experimentation illustrated in the exhibition provides compelling insights into the artist’s working methods and techniques. Whether it is a large painting, sculpture or small paper figures, Picasso creates a very original style that often hypnotises even the casual viewer. Although the title of the exhibition may not set the pulse racing, this is probably one of the most important Picasso exhibitions in recent years.

The exhibition sponsored by the City of Malaga runs from the 25 January to 13 April 2020

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review- Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits at the Royal Academy from 27 October 2019 to 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits is the first exhibition to focus on the artist’s self-portraits, the works covering almost seven decades provide a remarkable opportunity to chart Freud’s (1922-2011) artistic development. The exhibition brings together around 50 works, many from private collections and a number have not been seen publicly for several decades.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lucian Freud is considered as one of the foremost 20th century British painters, he was the grandson of Sigmund Freud and arrived in Britain in 1933 after leaving Germany to escape the rise of Nazism. Freud moved to London in 1943 and over the next few years he became closely involved with the London arts scene, and formed a close friendship with fellow artist Francis Bacon.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The start of the exhibition contrasts his first major self-portrait, Man with a Feather, 1943 alongside his late work Self-portrait, Reflection, 2002.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The second section at Freud’s explores his early works, including his drawings and sketchbooks. They reveal that Freud uses his own self-image in a playful way with the mythological guise of Actaeon (Self-portrait with Antlers), 1949 and as a character in illustrations for plays and stories such as Flyda and Arvid, 1947.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Freud’s work from the 1950s began to take his self portraits and painting much more seriously illustrated by Hotel Bedroom, 1954 and Self Portrait 1956.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Unusually, Freud often used mirrors to capture his self image which allowed him to change his perspective which is seen in Hand Mirror on Chair, 1966 and Interior with Hand Mirror (Self portrait), 1967.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The 1980s and 1990s saw Freud’s artistic reputation rising in the UK and internationally and his work gained a self assurance and a new honesty,

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985 possesses the penetrating stare for which Freud was famous. In 1993, Freud completed Painter Working, Reflection, 1993 which exposes his ageing body, depicting himself naked but for a pair of boots.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The section entitled Reflections in the Studio show Freud’s portraits of other people, including a large scale painting of his son, Freddy Standing, 2000-1.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Some of the final self-portraits, show the artist now in his 80s, world weary but defiant his face gaunt and built up with thick layers of paint.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although many artists have portrayed their life’s journey in self portraits, Freud has an unusual relationship with his self image. He stated that “ I don’t accept the information that I get when I look at myself and that’s where the trouble starts” and ” I am not very introspective but I was very shy, so I tried to overcome it by being exhibitionistic.”

This fascinating exhibition explores these contradictions in Freud’s self portraits, the viewer traces the artist’s life from his youthful playfulness to the sombre reflections of ageing. Strangely considering his family connections, Freud is more concerned with the physical than the psychological. Known as an intensely private man, it is his portraits which are the vehicle that exposes him to the world outside his studio.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review: Antony Gormley at the Royal Academy from 21 September to 3 December 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed British sculptor Antony Gormley. In one of the artist’s most significant exhibitions in the UK for over a decade, Gormley uses all 13 rooms  in the RA’s Main Galleries to experiment with scale, darkness, light, and using a variety of materials.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The early galleries feature rarely-exhibited works from the late 1970s and early 1980s Works l include Land, Sea and Air, 1977-79 and Fruits of the Earth, 1978-79 in which natural and man-made objects are wrapped in lead.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is also a series of concrete works from the 1990s including Flesh, 1990 . Each volume contains the body form as a void in a position that tests the enclosing mass. The interior is only visible through the hands, feet or head that break the surface of the block.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors are encouraged to engage with a number of whole-room installations like Cave 2019, some installations have been specially  reconfigured for the RA’s galleries.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lost Horizon I, 2008  features 24 cast iron figures set in different orientations on every wall, floor and ceiling.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Clearing VII, 2019 consists of kilometres of coiled, flexible aluminium tubing arcing from floor to ceiling and wall to wall; a ‘drawing in space’ which encircles the visitor.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Matrix III, 2019 is a cloud of intersecting rectangular dark steel mesh suspended above head height.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Host, 2019 fills an entire gallery to a depth of 23cm with a vast expanse of seawater and clay.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

At the centre of the exhibition in the Central Hall are two of Gormley’s early ‘expansion’ works; Body and Fruit, both from 1991-3, these hollow pieces have the characteristics of both bomb and fruit that weighs several tonnes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although known for his sculptures, the exhibition explores Gormley’s  works on paper which illustrate the importance of drawing for the artist. The exhibition features early drawings such as Mould, 1981. Body and Light drawings, the Linseed Oil Works (1985-1990) such as Double Moment, 1987, and the Red Earth drawings (1987-1998). The displays of Gormley’s workbooks reveal the artist’s continual investigation experimentation of ideas that often lead to the sculptural works.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition provides an opportunity to explore the range of works by Antony Gormley. Although the artist is widely known for the Angel of the North and Another Place sculptures, this exhibition takes the visitor on a journey in which they are asked to interact with their surroundings in a number of ways. Gormley fills some of the exhibition spaces with a series of installations that take over the entire room and questions our perception of ourselves and pieces of art.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review: Helene Schjerfbeck at the Royal Academy from 20 July to 27 October 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts presents an exhibition which covers the long and productive career of Finnish artist Helene Schjerfbeck (1862 – 1946). The exhibition is the first solo exhibition of Schjerfbeck’s works to be held in the UK.  Schjerfbeck is considered one of the most famous and highly regarded artists in Finland and is known in Nordic countries and across mainland Europe, but is little known in the UK.

The exhibition features around 65 portraits, landscapes and still lifes and charts the artistic development of Schjerfbeck’s work from a more naturalistic style , to a more abstracted and modern approach from the turn of the twentieth century.

The exhibition is organised in five sections. Paris, Pont Aven and St Ives shows Schjerfbeck’s early works which demonstrate the influence of the naturalistic painting. The earliest work in the exhibition is Two Profiles, 1881, depicting Schjerfbeck’s lifelong friend and fellow painter Marianne Preindelsberger. There  are examples from her time spent in the artists’ colony of St Ives, Cornwall in the late 1880s. One of Schjerfbeck’s early successes was The Convalescent, 1888 exhibited at the Paris Salon.

The second section, Moments of Intimacy illustrates a change of emphasis with larger canvases capturing creating private moments like Maria, 1909. Schjerfbeck moved  back to Finland in 1896 and began teaching at the Finnish Art Society’s drawing school in Helsinki.  Schjerfbeck then moved with her mother to the rural town of Hyvinkää in 1902, where she used her mother as a model and her style began to evolve into a more modernist approach.

The central gallery features a series of Self-portraits from the age of 22 to 83, Schjerfbeck seemed to be fascinated by the process of aging and many of the self-portraits offer a opportunity to see the artist’s style changing from the more traditional naturalistic to  the more abstract ghostly and confrontational presence.

The section entitled the Modern Look features portraits of family, friends and models made between 1909 and 1944. Schjerfbeck was inspired by magazines and journals and many of the paintings are similar to magazine illustrations but based on real people. She often names the portrait as types rather than real people like The Skier (English Girl) 1909 which actually looks like a clown. As women’s roles began to change in society, Schjerfbeck seems fascinated with these changes and often referred to paintings from earlier centuries like Profile of Madonna after El Greco, 1943.

The exhibition concludes with Still Life, a group of pictures that perhaps senses the artist’s own mortality and uses nature to illustrate the process of life and decay, Three Pears on a Plate, 1945 is the final painting she ever made.

This fascinating exhibition introduces the work of Helene Schjerfbeck to a wider audience and offers the rare opportunity to view a large number of the artist’s work. Schjerfbeck is one of those artists that seem to operate in their own world and follow their intuitions rather than the fads and fashions of art. She was particularly interested in women and women’s role in society, her later paintings in particular seem to suggest that women were becoming asked to be various types rather than individuals. The paintings often blur the distinctive features of the portraits as if the person was losing their individuality.  Is this why her later self portraits seem so confrontational as if to say this is the ‘real me’ not a stereotype.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review- Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet at the Royal Academy from 30 June to 29 September 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents a survey of paintings and prints by the Swiss artist Félix Vallotton (1865–1925). This will be the first exhibition of the artist’s work in the UK since 1976. Although the artist is admired in his native Switzerland, Vallotton remains relatively little known elsewhere.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features around 100 works from public and private collections across Europe and the U.S and includes representations from every period of the artist’s career.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The first section of the exhibition presents a number of Vallotton’s work from the 1880s, following his arrival in Paris at the age of sixteen. Although he was influenced by contemporary movements such as Impressionism, the artist followed more closely artists of the Northern and Dutch traditions with works like his earliest known self-portrait, Self-portrait at the Age of Twenty, 1885 and the painting The Sick Girl, 1892.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Vallotton at this time had yet to find his own particular artistic style, however in the early 1890s he formed ties with the Nabis, a group of avant-garde artists including Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard. It was around this time that Vallotton began to experiment with print making especially Japanese woodblock printing. These type of illustrations were very popular in newspapers and magazines and Vallotton made a steady income from magazine illustrations, he became the principal illustrator for the influential journal La Revue blanche.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many of his prints were satirical, the series Intimités, 1897–98 and paintings of interior scenes, 1898–99, such as The Visit, 1899  exposes some of hypocrisies of the Parisian bourgeoisie.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

When La Revue blanche closed, Vallotton entered into marriage with a wealthy widow Gabrielle Rodrigues-Henriques in 1899 and concentrated on painting. His work from this time often featured psychological dramas in domestic interiors, the artist plays with perspective and lighting to create idea that behind the familiar lurks all kinds of dark secrets.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This theme is carried on from around 1904  when the female nude became Vallotton’s principal subject. This section of the exhibition presents works such as Nude Holding her Gown, 1904 and Models Resting, 1905. The nudes seem consumed by shame and unwilling to play the game of being alluring, this style was very different from other painters of the period.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Often the nudes are in pairs and look to be in conversation whilst in the background mirrors and reflections offer a dark background to the light foreground.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A section focuses on paintings and prints produced during the First World War, the artist’s initial enthusiasm for the war was changed by a visit to the trenches and his portfolio This is War!, 1916 features splattered red ink on the cover, while the six images, in black and white, capture the danger and terror of the ordinary soldier fighting at the front.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition concludes with a selection of Vallotton’s landscapes and still-life paintings. The landscapes like Sandbanks on the Loire, 1923 have a surreal quality with limited colour and simple compositions.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover the often original and innovative work of Felix Vallotton, this often overlooked artist provides a very different perspective of Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Vallotton indicates with his work that it is a city that underneath its bonhomie harbours dark secrets. This psychological interplay plays a major part in Vallotton’s later works especially his nudes series. It is possible that the artist’s painting and prints were a little too close to the mark for the wealthy patrons from the Parisian bourgeoisie which exposed many of their less pleasing qualities. This may be part of the reason, why his work was not highly valued at the time and why it is only in recent years that his originality and innovation have been more widely recognised.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Summer Exhibition 2019 at the Royal Academy from 10 June to 12 August 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is one of the great English Art traditions, it is the world’s oldest open-submission exhibition being established in 1768 whose long line of exhibitors reads like a Who’s Who of British Art. Some of the earliest exhibitors included the likes of Reynolds, Constable and Turner, however the exhibition prides itself that it offers a snapshot of contemporary art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This year, the Royal Academy celebrates its 251st Summer Exhibition and acclaimed British painter, Jock McFadyen has been awarded the role of co-ordinator. McFadyen with the Summer Exhibition Committee have tried to create a show that builds a unique platform for artists at all stages of their career to present recent work.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The artwork begins before you enter the building  with artist Thomas Houseago  showing  a group of large-scale sculptural works in the Royal Academy’s Annenberg Courtyard next to Academy’s statue of Joshua Reynolds, which has stood in the courtyard since 1931.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors enter the exhibition through the Central Hall which features a ‘menagerie’ of animals of all shapes and sizes including Polar Bear by Shira Zelwer, D.F.W.T.W 2 by Ron Arad and Easy Tiger – Mach Brothers by David Mach.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Against the wall is Keep Ou by Banksy, this features a custom arch salvaged from Heathrow airport with a small painting at the bottom.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Spencer de Grey RA curates the Architecture Gallery, which explores the theme of sustainability. Many notable architects have summitted models and prints including Lord Foster, Arup, Lord Rogers and Sir Nicholas Grimshaw.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Part of the fun is walking around the exhibition and spotting work by established artists, work that particularly caught my eye were Lily and Quaye by Ishbel Myerscough, We are all Immigrant Scum by Jeremy Deller and A Kind of Blue by Allen Jones.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Other artists exhibiting in this year’s Summer Exhibition include Tracey Emin , Gary Hume , David Nash , Wolfgang Tillmans and Anselm Kiefer. The celebrated German filmmaker and photographer Wim Wenders has taken over the free McAulay Gallery, with a series of panoramic photographs.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Each room offers a kaleidoscope of colour and images in a range of media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Summer Exhibition offers a platform for emerging and established artists and architects to showcase their work in front of a large international audience. The Summer Exhibition also plays a practical role in training young artists, it raises funds to finance the current students of the RA Schools. The RA Schools is the longest established art school in the UK and offers the only free three-year postgraduate programme in Europe.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show which has taken place every year without interruption since 1769. Works from all over the world are judged on merit and the final selection is made during the eight-day hang in the galleries. This year the Royal Academy received over 16,000 entries with around 1200 works going on display.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition has a large number of wonderfully eclectic works on display, there is really something for everyone regardless of your particular artistic taste. The Summer Exhibition is one of the highlights of the art world’s summer and attracts a wide range of visitors. It also offers a rare opportunity to buy works from well-known and not so well-known artists with prices ranging from a few hundred to over a hundred thousand pounds.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet at the Royal Academy from 30 June to 29 September 2019

In June 2019, the Royal Academy of Arts will present a survey of paintings and prints by the Swiss artist Félix Vallotton (1865–1925). This will be the first exhibition of the artist’s work in the UK since 1976. Greatly admired in his native Switzerland, Vallotton remains relatively little known elsewhere. The exhibition will serve as a rare opportunity to discover the highly original and innovative work of this often overlooked artist.

Comprising around 100 works from public and private collections across Europe and the U.S., the exhibition will demonstrate the intensity of Vallotton’s unique vision by bringing together outstanding examples from every period of the artist’s career.

The exhibition will be organised in thematic sections. The first will present Vallotton’s work from the 1880s, following his arrival in Paris at the age of sixteen. He avoided the contemporary movements such as Impressionism and turned instead to artists of the Northern and Dutch traditions with works like his earliest known self-portrait, Self-portrait at the Age of Twenty, 1885 (Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne) and the linear clarity of the painting The Sick Girl, 1892 (Kunsthaus, Zürich).

The second section will bring together work from a period of radical development for Vallotton. In the early 1890s he formed ties with the Nabis, a group of avant-garde artists including Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard. Like them, Vallotton was an attentive observer of contemporary life in Paris, though his unsparing caricatural illustrations and satires of Parisian society set him apart.

Vallotton distinguished himself as one of the great printmakers of his age. Magazine illustrations provided a stable income for the artist and La Revue blanche was a ready vehicle for his prints. Simple in design and bold in their use of black, his woodcuts provide sharply reductive imagery, owing in part to Japanese woodblock printing. Technically daring and bitingly satirical, the series Intimités, 1897–98, best articulates the artist’s unvarnished voyeurism and his exploration of the subtle power struggles and hypocrisies of the Parisian bourgeoisie. These are themes that are echoed in the celebrated paintings of interior scenes, 1898–99, such as The Visit, 1899 (Kunsthaus, Zürich), a masterpiece of enigmatic narrative.

The closing of La Revue blanche coincided with Vallotton’s marriage to the wealthy widow Gabrielle Rodrigues-Henriques in 1899, bringing with it a new financial security that allowed him to concentrate on painting. His early claustrophobic, psychologically charged interiors open up to light-filled rooms of well-appointed apartments, and the synthetic style of the prints is replaced with a broad, painterly realism.

From around 1904 onwards, the female nude became Vallotton’s principal subject. This section of the exhibition will present works such as Nude Holding her Gown, 1904 (Private Collection) and Models Resting, 1905, (Kunst Museum Winterthur). Here the subjects are depicted in a distinctive, hard-edged style, indebted to artists of the Northern tradition such as Cranach and, again, Ingres in the classical coolness and smooth surfaces.

A section will focus on paintings and prints produced during the First World War, an event that profoundly affected the artist. The cover of his portfolio This is War!, 1916 (Musée d’art et d’histoire, Geneva), Vallotton’s last series of woodcuts, features splattered red ink on the cover, while the six images, in strongly contrasting blacks and whites, capture the danger and terror of the ordinary soldier fighting at the front.

The exhibition will conclude with a survey of Vallotton’s landscapes and still-life paintings. This selection includes the artist’s remarkable paysages composés, landscapes based more on memory and imagination than composed from real life observation.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here