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Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition Programme 2021

Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition Programme 2021

The Royal Academy of Arts have just released their exhibition programme for 2021, it includes a mixture of old and new which provides plenty of opportunity for visitors to enjoy the art on show.

Francis Bacon: Man and Beast
Main Galleries
30 January – 18 April 2021

In January 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present Francis Bacon: Man and Beast, the first exhibition to chart the development of the artist’s work through the lens of his fascination with animals, and how this impacted upon his treatment of his ultimate subject: the human figure. Francis Bacon (1909–1992) is recognised as one of the most important artists of the twentieth century. This important exhibition will include 45 remarkable paintings spanning his career; from his earliest works of the 1930s and 40s through to the final painting he ever made in 1991, which will be exhibited publicly for the first time in the UK. Among the works, a trio of paintings of bullfights, all made in 1969, will also be displayed together for the first time.

Michael Armitage: Paradise Edict
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
13 March – 6 June 2021

In March 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of Kenyan-born artist Michael Armitage (b. 1984). Armitage graduated from the RA Schools in 2010 and now works between Nairobi and London. In his paintings, Armitage brings together the Western painting tradition (drawing on Titian, Goya, Manet and Gauguin among others) with East African contemporary art, popular culture and politics. Also on display will be a group of works by East African artists, such as Jak Katarikawe (1938-2018), Theresa Musoke (b. 1944) and Meek Gichugu (b. 1968), selected by Armitage for their importance to the development of figurative painting in Kenya and to his artistic development. Alongside his work, Armitage recently founded the Nairobi Contemporary Art Institute, a non-profit visual arts space.

David Hockney: The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
27 March – 22 August 2021

The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020 comprises a new body of work created by David Hockney RA during a period of intense activity at his home in Normandy and charts the unfolding and progression of spring. The period in which these works were made coincided with the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, where Hockney, along with the rest of Europe and much of the world, was in a state of lockdown. Faced with an unprecedented and perplexing period, Hockney’s focus on the emergence of spring instead celebrates the natural world and urges us, as he does himself in one of his frequently used phrases, to ‘love life’. The works have been ‘painted’ on an iPad, and then printed on paper at a large-scale.

Summer Exhibition 2021
Main Galleries
15 June – 17 August 2021

The Royal Academy’s annual Summer Exhibition, the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show, is now in its 253rd year. It provides a unique platform for emerging and established artists to showcase their works to an international audience, comprising a range of media from painting, printmaking and photography, to sculpture, architecture and film. It has been held each year without interruption since 1769. Around 1200 works will go on display, the majority of which will be for sale offering visitors an opportunity to purchase original work.

Milton Avery
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
3 July – 26 September 2021

Milton Avery (1885-1965) has long been recognised in the United States as one of the most important and influential twentieth-century American artists. Avery’s compositions, taken from daily life, including portraits and landscapes, are imbued with a colour sensibility, harmony and balance which was to have a major influence on the next artistic generation. Avery played a vital role in the development of Abstract Expressionism, through his close association with some of the younger exponents of the movement, such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Adolph Gottlieb. The last retrospective of his work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1982 and this will be the first solo exhibition of Milton Avery in Europe.

Marina Abramović: After Life
Main Galleries
25 September – 12 December 2021

In September 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed performance artist Marina Abramović Hon RA. The exhibition will be Abramović’s first major survey in the UK, bringing together key works spanning her entire career. The exhibition will explore how Abramović captures and defines performance art through photographs, videos, objects, installations and live re-performances of her work, reflecting Abramović’s interest in the legacy of performance art.

Herzog & de Meuron
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
23 October 2021 – 23 January 2022

In Autumn 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of the critically acclaimed architectural practice Herzog & de Meuron, founded in Basel in 1978. With projects across the globe, the work of the practice continues to astound and inspire, as they transform what might otherwise be an ordinary condition or material into something extraordinary that engages with the senses. Notable projects include Tate Modern, London (2000 and 2016) and the National Stadium, Beijing (2008). In this exhibition at the Royal Academy, Herzog & de Meuron will explore ways of exhibiting architecture at this critical moment in time.

Late Constable
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
30 October 2021 – 13 February 2022

In 2021, the Royal Academy will present an exhibition on the late work of John Constable (1776-1837). The exhibition’s point of departure is the last of Constable’s celebrated six-foot Suffolk canal scenes, The Leaping Horse, one of the highlights of the RA’s collection, first exhibited in 1825. It is in this painting that, by inserting the detail of the tower of Dedham Church, Constable first departs from the notion of topographical accuracy which had been a hallmark of his work until that date. Distinguished by its rich technical vocabulary, the artist’s late work, though often conservative in subject matter, becomes increasingly expressive in style. The exhibition will explore Constable’s late career, from 1825 until his unexpected death in 1837, through his paintings and oil sketches as well as watercolours, drawings and prints.

RA Schools Show 2021
RA Schools Studios and Weston Studio
17 – 27 June 2021

The RA Schools Show is the annual exhibition of works by artists graduating from the UK’s longest established contemporary art school, the RA Schools. The show will present work by emerging artists in a range of media with each exhibiting in solo spaces in the rarely-seen working studios within the Royal Academy.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Royal Academy of Arts Revised Exhibition Programme 2020

Following the temporary closure of the Royal Academy of Arts due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the exhibition programme for the remainder of 2020 has changed. Whilst the reopening date is still to be confirmed, the Royal Academy intends to:

Continue Léon Spilliaert throughout the summer to mid-September

Open Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection when the RA reopens, ending mid-October

Reschedule Summer Exhibition 2020 for the autumn, with a planned start in October 2020

Open Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul in early November 2020

Postpone the highly anticipated Marina Abramović exhibition until autumn 2021

Postpone Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist until 2021

Due to the closure, the Royal Academy of Arts has had to cancel two exhibitions:

Angelica Kauffman

Cezanne: The Rock and Quarry Paintings

The Royal Academy’s reopening date will be dependent upon government advice.

Exhibition Programme 2020

Léon Spilliaert

This is the first major exhibition of Belgian artist Léon Spilliaert (1881–1946) to be held in the UK. Bringing together around 80 works drawn from public and private collections across Belgium, France, Great Britain and the USA, the exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover this intriguing, singular artist who left an indelible mark on the twentieth century art of Belgium.

Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection

Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection will showcase 60 works drawn from one of the finest collections of Impressionist paintings in northern Europe, assembled in the first decades of the twentieth century by wealthy Danish couple Wilhelm and Henny Hansen.

Summer Exhibition 2020

The Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show and has been held every year without interruption since 1769, even throughout the war years.

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul

The Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of work by Tracey Emin RA, revealing her long-standing fascination with the artist Edvard Munch, of whom she states: ‘I’ve been in love with this man since I was eighteen’.

Exhibition Postponements

Marina Abramović
Postponed until autumn 2021 (exact dates to be announced)

In 2021 the Royal Academy of Arts will present a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed performance artist Marina Abramović Hon RA. The exhibition will be Abramović’s first major survey in the UK, bringing together over 50 works spanning her entire career.

Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist
Postponed until 2021 (exact dates to be announced)

Rita Angus (1908 – 1970) is justly considered one of New Zealand’s most important early modern artists. She was a pioneer in celebrating the rich and powerful landscapes of the country in a bold new way.

Exhibition Cancellations

Unfortunately, due to the coronavirus pandemic the following 2020 exhibitions at the Royal Academy of Arts have been cancelled: Angelica Kauffman and Cezanne: The Rock and Quarry Paintings.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Picasso and Paper at the Royal Academy from 25 January to 13 April 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents an exhibition entitled Picasso and Paper which is the most comprehensive exhibition devoted to Picasso’s imaginative and original uses of paper ever to be held. The exhibition brings together over 300 works and covers Picasso’s remarkable 80-year career, the exhibition illustrates the ways in which the artist worked both on and with paper, and provides new insights into this little known aspect of the artist’s work.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) is considered one of the most important artists of the 20th century and he worked in a large range of mediums including painting, sculpture, ceramics and graphic arts.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition is organised chronologically and explores all stages of Picasso’s career working with paper and features works like Women at Their Toilette, winter 1937-38, which is exhibited in the UK for the first time in over 50 years; Cubist papiers-collés such as Violin, 1912; studies for his famous work Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features many of Picasso’s drawings, including Self-portrait, 1918 and Seated Woman (Dora), 1938.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a number of drawings, displayed alongside closely related paintings and sculptures. La Vie, 1903 , is displayed with preparatory drawings. Picasso’s Cubist bronze Head of a Woman (Fernande), 1909 is exhibited together with associated drawings. The large sculpture, Man with a Sheep, 1943 is displayed together with a group of large ink and wash drawings.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All through the exhibition is evidence of the enormous range of Picasso’s experimental work over the course of his career. Woodcuts printed by hand, photograms made with Dora Maar and later with André Villers, designs for the ballet, experimental graphic designs and illustrated books.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Within the exhibition is a room showing the film Le Mystère Picasso of 1955, a documentary showing the artist drawing with with felt-tip pens, some of those original drawings are on show.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The closing section focuses on Picasso’s last decade which focuses on his work as a printmaker. Drawings, prints and copper plates are displayed near Picasso’s printing press from the period.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This remarkable and fascinating exhibition offers people the opportunity to understand the creative genius of Pablo Picasso in all its guises. Whilst many people will be familiar with certain aspects of the artist’s career, very rarely do you see the full range of his talent. His relentless and dynamic creativity and experimentation illustrated in the exhibition provides compelling insights into the artist’s working methods and techniques. Whether it is a large painting, sculpture or small paper figures, Picasso creates a very original style that often hypnotises even the casual viewer. Although the title of the exhibition may not set the pulse racing, this is probably one of the most important Picasso exhibitions in recent years.

The exhibition sponsored by the City of Malaga runs from the 25 January to 13 April 2020

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review : Oceania at the Royal Academy – 29th September to 10th December 2018

The Royal Academy of Arts presents Oceania, the first ever major survey of Oceanic art to be held in the United Kingdom. This exhibition celebrates the art of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia, encompassing the Pacific region from New Guinea to Easter Island, Hawaii to New Zealand.

The exhibition brings together around 200 works from public and private collections worldwide, and will span over 500 years and offers a rare opportunity to  explore the art and culture of an area that is rich in history, ritual and ceremony.

The exhibition marks the 250th anniversary of the Royal Academy, founded in 1768, the same year Captain James Cook set sail on his first expedition to the Pacific on the Endeavour. When Captain James Cook left on the first of three voyages he found in the Pacific, highly sophisticated cultures with networks of communication between islands due the skill of sailors from the various islands using ocean-going canoes and navigational aids.

People from the various Pacific islands would travel long distances which enabled an exchange of technologies and culture. The exhibition explores how new discoveries are leading historians and art experts to present many historic collections in new contexts to gain a better understanding.

The exhibition begins by focusing on the art associated with voyaging and the importance of not only the canoes and navigational aids but of the sacred designs on the carved prows and paddles. Canoes also featured in origin stories and death rituals.

As new islands were reached and settled, a complex networks of communities were established, while many islanders lived from the food of the ocean, gradually land was cultivated and political systems developed.

Along with the physical world, many communities developed a divine world with a series of gods that were represented by statues, masks and other objects.

Ceremonies were often complex and organised with precision, music was played  and elaborate dances took place with specific costumes, shields and masks. The exhibition features an extraordinary 19th century Ceremonial Feast Bowl from the Solomon Islands. Measuring nearly 7 metres in length, this bowl has never been exhibited before.

One important feature of Pacific life was gift giving and many of the items in the exhibition were freely given to Europeans when they began to explore the Pacific. The gifts given were often of great symbolic meaning, prized items like a Hawaiian feather god image or a Samoan fine mat took months to make and were very valuable items and created for the nobility of the island communities.

A late 18th century Feather god image (akua hulu manu) from the Hawaiian Islands (British Museum) is likely to have been collected on Cook’s third voyage.

The exhibition provides evidence that the rich artistic traditions in Oceania are alive and well with a modern twist, contemporary Oceanic art that speaks of the  past as well as the challenges of the present. Contemporary work in the exhibition will include the vast panoramic video In Pursuit of Venus [infected], 2015-17, by the New Zealand multi-media artist, Lisa Reihana (Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki) and John Pule’s, Kehe tau hauaga foou (To all new arrivals), 2007 (Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki).

This fascinating exhibition illustrates that artistic traditions in Oceania have a long and distinguished history before Europeans began to explore the region. Contrary to European belief, the Pacific islanders were not isolated from each other and the rest of the world but were part of a vast network made possible by the remarkable skills in boat building and navigation. The exhibition provides evidence that despite the vast distances, different artistic styles were shared as the Islanders traveled around the Pacific. For centuries, traditional art from the area was considered decorative but naïve, however recent research is beginning to challenge this misconception and exhibition like these show the rich artistic traditions from the area and some of the latest developments.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended   

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings at the Royal Academy of Arts from 15th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts present an exhibition of the internationally-renowned architect and Honorary Royal Academician Renzo Piano. The exhibition entitled Renzo Piano: The Art of Buildings is the first comprehensive survey of Piano’s career to be held in London since 1989, and is located in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens.

Renzo Piano  is one of the world’s leading architects and is primarily known for his work on the Centre Pompidou in Paris, The Shard in London and the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.  In 1981 the architect founded the Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), located in Paris, Genoa and New York, which, with a team of 150 staff, has realised over 100 projects that include large cultural and institutional buildings, housing and offices, as well as urban plans for entire city districts.

Born into a family of Italian builders, Piano has incorporated the practical aspects of this background with experimentation with form, material and engineering to create a coherent whole. Piano is known for his attention to detail in the design process, constantly testing the way that the buildings will look and feel.

The exhibition offers  an overview of the architect’s practice through sixteen of his most significant projects, dating from his early career when he was experimenting with innovative structural systems, to some of his best known buildings of the present day. Highlights include Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971), Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa (1998), The New York Times Building (2007), The Shard, London (2012), Jérôme Seydoux Pathé Foundation, Paris (2014) and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).

The projects are laid out on tables in a couple of the galleries and are a mixture of archival material, models, photographs and drawings. Each project display gives some insights into the design process but perhaps more importantly into the conceptual theme of each particular building.

To understand more about how Piano sees the world and the role of architecture within it, there is a specially commissioned film by Thomas Riedelsheimer in the central gallery.

Also in the central gallery is large centrepiece that is a sculptural installation designed by RPBW especially for the exhibition, illustrating 100 of Piano’s projects on an imaginary island.

Around the walls of the gallery are 32 photographs by Gianni Berengo Gardin, large drawings of various projects and hanging from the ceiling are various models of different pieces of materials used in the design process.

Architecture is often quite a difficult form to show in art galleries, very often models do not do justice to the large-scale of the actual buildings. However this fascinating exhibition is more concerned in providing some insights into the work, aspirations and achievements of an architect who believes in the many possibilities of architecture.  The new Royal Academy is committed to raising the profile and appreciation of architects and architecture, this high-profile exhibition provides a wonderful launching board for many other exhibitions on the subject.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended   

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings at the Royal Academy of Arts – 15th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

In autumn 2018, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of the internationally-renowned architect and Honorary Royal Academician Renzo Piano. This will be the first comprehensive survey of Piano’s career to be held in London since 1989, and will be presented in the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens, on the occasion of the 250th anniversary of the Royal Academy.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop,
The Shard, London Bridge Tower and London Bridge Place, London, 2012.
© RPBW. Photography: William Matthews.

Renzo Piano  is one of the world’s leading architects and his buildings have enriched cities and spaces across the globe. From designing the Centre Pompidou in Paris as a young architect with Richard Rogers, to projects including The Shard in London and the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, Piano’s work continues to pioneer ground-breaking architecture that touches the human spirit. In 1981 the architect founded the Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW), located in Paris, Genoa and New York, which, with a team of 150 staff, has realised over 100 projects that include large cultural and institutional buildings, housing and offices, as well as urban plans for entire city districts.

Born into a family of Italian builders, Piano places great importance on the crafting of elegant structures that embody a sense of lightness. Designing buildings “piece by piece”, Piano’s practice makes deft use of form, material and engineering to achieve a precise yet poetic elegance. He has a command of the entire process, from the structural systems to individual building components, designed for optimum technical performance as well as aesthetic and haptic qualities. Such is the importance of these aspects of the architecture, that full-scale mock-ups of sections of the buildings are created during the design process to test how they will look and feel, from the composition as a whole, to smaller technical details.

Renzo Piano Building Workshop,
Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa, 1998.
© RPBW. Photography: Sergio Grazia / ADCK – centre culturel Tjibaou.

Renzo Piano: The Art of Making Buildings will offer an overview of the architect’s practice through sixteen of his most significant projects, dating from his early career when he was experimenting with innovative structural systems, to the signature buildings of the present day. Highlights include Centre Pompidou, Paris (1971), Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre, Nouméa (1998), The New York Times Building (2007), The Shard, London (2012), Jérôme Seydoux Pathé Foundation, Paris (2014) and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2015).

Rarely seen archival material, models, photographs and drawings will reveal the process behind the conception and realisation of Piano’s best known buildings. For example, on display will be one of the original models made during the design process for the Menil Collection in Houston (1986), showing how Piano and his team rigorously explored creative ways to bring natural light into the galleries, creating spaces that would be ideal for viewing art. Other highlights will include the white ceramic rods from the 1:1 mock-up of The New York Times Building, produced to test their scale, surface and reflectivity, as well as the original competition drawings for the Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre in Noumea that captivated the jury.

At the heart of the exhibition, there will be a focus on the architect himself through 32 photographs by Gianni Berengo Gardin and a specially commissioned film by Thomas Riedelsheimer highlighting Piano’s personal sensibilities and attitude to architecture  The centrepiece of this space will be a sculptural installation designed by RPBW especially for the exhibition, bringing together 100 of Piano’s projects on an imaginary island.

The exhibition will provide an exceptional insight into the work, aspirations and achievements of a man who believes passionately in the possibilities of architecture. It will demonstrate that far from being a straightforward art-form, architecture is a complex profession that carries social, political and financial responsibilities.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review: The New Royal Academy of Arts 2018

The Royal Academy of Arts will open its new campus to the public on Saturday 19 May 2018 as part of the celebrations of its 250th anniversary year. The redevelopment, designed by internationally-acclaimed architect Sir David Chipperfield has enable the Royal Academy to open up and reveal parts of the building and some of its historic treasures from its Collection. The changes will also enable the RA to further highlight the work of its Royal Academicians and the Royal Academy Schools.  

The redevelopment has created a link between Burlington House and Burlington Gardens which unites the buildings and creates up to 70% more space than the RA’s original Burlington House footprint.  

One of the highlights of the redevelopment is the creation of a new Royal Academy Collection Gallery which presents The Making of an Artist: The Great Tradition highlighting works from the RA Collection, including the ‘Taddei Tondo’ by Michelangelo and the RA’s almost full-size sixteenth century copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, along with paintings by Reynolds, Kauffman, Thornhill, Constable, Gainsborough and Turner.

The Architecture Studio provides a creative space that invites audience engagement with innovative and critical ideas on architecture. The space opens with Invisible Landscapes which explores the impact of technology in people’s environments.

Learning from the past has been enabled by displaying a series of historical architectural casts in The Dorfman Architecture Court.

Near to Weston Bridge, which now connects Burlington Gardens into Burlington House, The Ronald and Rita McAulay Gallery will stage site-specific installations by Royal Academicians. The first major work will be Tips for a Good Life by Bob and Roberta Smith RA (September 2018 – September 2019), on the subject of gender in the history of the RA.

The Weston Studio which is within the Royal Academy Schools complex will be the site for displays and projects developed by students and graduates, it opens with a group exhibition of works by first year students.  

Teaching has been at the forefront of the RA since the RA Schools’ foundation in 1769. In the Vaults area is an exhibit entitled The Making of an Artist: Learning to Draw which displays a remarkable selection of plaster casts from the early years of the RA Schools with works on paper from the RA’s teaching collection.

Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE inaugurates the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens which will complement the other exhibition spaces and allow a wider breadth of exhibition space to enable the RA to expand its exhibition programme and to create new and free displays of art and architecture across the campus for visitors year-round.

The new RA will encourage a public discussion and debate with a new 250 seat Benjamin West Lecture Theatre with a series of talks, festival and educational programmes.

Attending the Royal Academy is always a pleasure because there is so much history ingrained into the fabric of the building. It was reassuring the new development has not tried to bring the building up to date but rather highlighted some of the idiosyncratic aspects of the building. So the brickwork in the Vaults provides a welcome relief from the more classical aspects of the entrances and stairways.  

The Royal Academy of the Arts has great traditions but because it is run by artists is well aware that it is often about paying homage to the past but not being constricted by it. In recent years, the RA has built a great reputation by maintaining the often fragile balance between promoting new art and preserving the traditions of the organisation. This new development is yet another milestone in the illustrious history of the organisation and provides evidence that it can celebrate its 250th anniversary year with confidence in its future.

Royal Academy will unveil the new and transformed campus to the general public on the 19th May 2018.

For more information , visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

The New Royal Academy of Arts will open on 19th May 2018

The Royal Academy of Arts will open its new campus to the public on Saturday 19 May 2018 as part of the celebrations of its 250th anniversary year. Following redevelopment, designed by internationally-acclaimed architect Sir David Chipperfield CBE RA and supported by the National Lottery, the new Royal Academy will open up and reveal more of the elements that make the RA unique – sharing with the public historic treasures from its Collection, the work of its Royal Academicians and the Royal Academy Schools, alongside its world-class exhibitions programme.

One of the most significant outcomes of the redevelopment is the link between Burlington House and Burlington Gardens, uniting the two-acre campus. This will provide 70% more space than the RA’s original Burlington House footprint, enabling the RA to expand its exhibition programme and to create new and free displays of art and architecture across the campus for visitors year-round. From dedicated galleries to surprising interventions, a dynamic series of changing exhibits and installations will present the living heritage of the Royal Academy; exploring its foundation and history in training artists as well as showcasing contemporary works by Royal Academicians and students at the RA Schools. To bring life to  the displays, a new range of free tours, taster talks and object handling stations will be available to visitors.

Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE (19 May – 12 August 2018) will inaugurate the new Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries in Burlington Gardens. The exhibition is part of an unprecedented collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery and the National Gallery in London. It will showcase the internationally-renowned visual artist and Royal Academician Tacita Dean.

The new Royal Academy Collection Gallery will present The Making of an Artist: The Great Tradition highlighting works from the RA Collection, including the ‘Taddei Tondo’ by Michelangelo and the RA’s almost full-size sixteenth century copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s The Last Supper, along with paintings by Reynolds, Kauffman, Thornhill, Constable, Gainsborough and Turner.

The Architecture Studio within The Dorfman Senate Rooms will provide a creative space that invites audience engagement with innovative and critical ideas on architecture and its intersection with the arts. It will open with Invisible Landscapes (19 May 2018 – March 2019), explored in three ‘Acts’ of immersive interventions looking at the impact and future of technology in people’s environments. In contrast, recently conserved historical architectural casts on display in The Dorfman Architecture Court will convey the history of teaching architecture: the tradition of learning to draw from casts of buildings.

Located at the entrance to the Weston Bridge, which connects Burlington Gardens into Burlington House, The Ronald and Rita McAulay Gallery will stage site-specific installations by Royal Academicians. The first major work will be Tips for a Good Life by Bob and Roberta Smith RA (September 2018 – September 2019), on the subject of gender in the history of the RA.

Moving through to Burlington House, visitors will arrive at the Weston Studio. Located within the heart of the Royal Academy Schools, the Weston Studio will bring the ethos and thinking of the RA Schools’ postgraduate programme to a changing contemporary series of two displays a year and projects developed by students and graduates. It will open with a group exhibition of works by first year students, revealing their rich use of subjects, approaches, methods and materials.

Going back in time, The Vaults will exhibit The Making of an Artist: Learning to Draw a formidable selection of plaster casts from the early years of the RA Schools displayed together with works on paper from the RA’s teaching collection, illustrating the RA’s role in the teaching of art since the RA Schools’ foundation in 1769.

For more information , visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Charles I: King and Collector at the Royal Academy from 27th January to 15th April 2018

The Royal Academy presents a new exhibition entitled Charles I: King and Collector which reunites some of the greatest masterpieces of the king’s collection for the first time. The exhibition features over 100 works of art including classical sculptures, Baroque paintings, remarkable miniatures and monumental tapestries.

The theme of the exhibition is how the political turmoil in 17th-century Europe provided opportunities to collect masterpieces from private collections and Charles I in particular, built his art collection by using these methods.  

The exhibition explores how the  king’s collection was used to illustrate a monarch’s power, his authority and good taste in the arts. Many of the great powers of Europe had built up great collections of art and had commissioned some of the great artists of the period to work for them. It was not just the competition from abroad that inspired the king to build up his collection, he was surrounded by aristocrats in his court most notably his friend, the Duke of Buckingham who were building their own collections.

When Charles reached nineteen, he inherited Queen Anne’s art collection when she died in 1619. He then travelled to Spain with the Duke of Buckingham and began to explore some of the great European collections. Titian in particular was a favourite as were many of the Italian masters and he returned to England with a number of works including paintings by Titian, Correggio and Veronese.

The exhibition features Titian’s The Supper at Emmaus and Veronese’s Mars, Venus and Cupid. 

When Charles became King in 1625, he sent Nicolas Lanier to buy paintings in Italy, whilst in Venice, Lanier was told that one of the great collections in Europe may be for sale. The Gonzaga’s in Mantua had fallen on hard times and in 1628 they were persuaded to sell their famous collection. The Gonzaga hoard included classical and modern sculptures, paintings by Titian, Correggio and Jan van Eyck. It also included the nine large canvases of Mantegna’s Triumph of Caesar (c.1484-92), with its scenes of elephants and trumpeters, chariots and crowds. The canvases are included in the exhibition and are featured in a dedicated gallery of their own.

Equally monumental are the Mortlake tapestries of Raphael’s Act of the Apostles which are considered some of the most spectacular tapestries ever produced in England.

The spectacular Gonzaga purchase made Charles’ reputation as a serious collector, however his vast expense on art was not so popular at home and his great friend, the Duke of Buckingham was assassinated in 1628.  Charles carried on building his collection and began to commission paintings and portraits from famous artists Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck. One of the highlights of the exhibition is the monumental portraits of the king and his family.

In all, Van Dyck painted about 40 portraits of Charles, his triple portrait of the King was sent to Rome for Bernini to model his bust. Van Dyck use of horses made the rather small king seem tall and heroic.

In the exhibition is a room dedicated to the Cabinet Room in Whitehall Palace, this was the king’s inner sanctum which housed smaller items such as bas-reliefs, miniatures, books, engravings, drawings, medals and precious objects.

It is with some irony that considering Charles’ collection was amassed by taking advantage of political turmoil in Europe that it would be dispersed by similar events much closer to home. The fall of Charles in the English Civil War led to the collection being used to repay royal debts, many of the works being sold to European courts.

This fascinating and remarkable exhibition illustrates how art was used in the 17th century for the self-aggrandisement of monarchs and leaders. Charles I was not the first and will not be the last leader to learn the lesson that using the nation’s wealth to finance your own vanity projects usually ends in disaster. 

The exhibition launches the Royal Academy  250th celebrations and runs in parallel with Charles II: Art and Power at the Queens Gallery. 

Video Review available here

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended 

For more information and book tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Royal Academy of Arts celebrate its 250th Anniversary with a programme of Exhibitions and Events

In 2018, museums, galleries and art institutions across the United Kingdom will take part in RA250 UK, a major nationwide programme of talks, exhibitions and events to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the Royal Academy of Arts.

The wide ranging programme will run throughout 2018, celebrating the Royal Academicians, past and present, showing the impact they have had across the UK. An interactive online map outlining the events and exhibitions taking place is now live at royal academy.org.uk/ ra250uk.

The main focus of the celebrations is a series of 12 events with Royal Academicians in 12 different locations across 12 months. These will include Gilbert & George RA at The New Art Gallery, Walsall; Alison Wilding RA at Leeds Art Gallery; Eva Rothschild RA at the Pier Art Centre, Orkney; and Christopher Le Brun PRA at The Munnings Art Museum, Essex.

RA250 UK also includes:

In the North West, Manchester Art Gallery, Manchester – Annie Swynnerton Painting Light and Hope (23 February 2018 – 6 January 2019), the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool – Sean Scully: 1970 (14 July – 14 October 2018) and Abbot Hall Art Gallery, Kendal – History of the Royal Academy (2 March – 9 June 2018) and Women of the Royal Academy (11 May – 28 July 2018).

In the North East, the Great North Museum, Newcastle – The Great Exhibition of the North (22 June – 9 September 2018); Laing Art Gallery and Hatton Gallery, Newcastle – Sean Scully: 1970 (10 February – 28 May 2018) and the South Shields Museum & Art Gallery, Newcastle – Capturing a Star: Dame Flora Robson and other works by Dame Ethel Walker (22 September 2018 – 2 March 2019).

In the Midlands, Nottingham City Museums & Galleries, Newstead Abbey, Nottinghamshire – Harmonising Landscapes – Paul Sandby RA (16 June 2018 – 6 January 2019).

In the South West, Castle Drogo, National Trust, Exeter – Peter Randall-Page RA at Castle Drogo (Until 18 September 2018) and Russell-Cotes Art Gallery & Museum, Bournemouth – Making and Breaking the Rules: The Royal Academy 250 at the Russell-Cotes (4 May – 14 October 2018).

In the South East, Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge – RA250 at the Fitzwilliam Museum (5 February – 31 December 2018); Pallant House Gallery, Chichester – Cathie Pilkington RA (6 October 2018 – TBC February 2019) and Leonard Rosoman: Painting Theatre (3 February – 24 April 2018); and Southampton Art Gallery – Christopher Le Brun: Composer (15 September 2018 – 13 January 2019).

In London, the Royal Academy is partnering in an unprecedented collaboration with the National Gallery and National Portrait Gallery to present three exhibitions of Royal Academician Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE, PORTRAIT, STILL LIFE.

Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE, PORTRAIT, STILL LIFE

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT, National Portrait Gallery, 15 March – 28 May 2018

Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE, National Gallery, 15 March – 28 May 2018

Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE, Royal Academy of Arts, 19 May – 12 August 2018

In Scotland, the Scottish Maritime Museum, Glasgow – William Lionel Wyllie RA: War and the Sea (31 May – 25 September 2018) and The Royal Scottish Academy of Art and Architecture, Edinburgh – Barbara Rae RA RSA – Any Ordinary Journey: Following in the footsteps of Dr John Rae (4 August – 9 September 2018).

In Wales, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth – Discourse: Reynolds to Rego, 250 Years of Royal Academicians in Print (11 June – 31 August 2018).

In addition, The Space has commissioned Objects of Obsession, a series of filmed in-conversations with Royal Academicians and the RA’s Artistic Director Tim Marlow, which will be live streamed to a global audience. The series will explore the relationship between the RAs and the work of other artists who are important to their practice and will be hosted by the gallery or museum which houses the piece the artists have chosen. It will feature Cornelia Parker RA at Bethlem Museum of the Mind, 16 February; followed by Sonia Boyce RA at Manchester Art Gallery, 8 March; and Bob and Roberta Smith RA at The New Art Gallery Walsall, March. The events will be streamed on each gallery’s website, YouTube and Facebook, establishing a network of shared content for online audiences.

For more information , visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here