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Exhibition Review – Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 at The Queen’s Gallery from 9 November 2018 to 28 April 2019


The Queen’s Gallery presents the first exhibition of Roger Fenton’s Crimean works in London since 1856, the exhibition entitled Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 explores how the photographer brought the stark realities of the Crimea war to the public through more than 60 photographs from the Royal Collection.

Roger Fenton was already a respected photographer (Queen Victoria had commissioned Fenton to produce portraits of the royal family in 1854) when he travelled to the Crimea.

He had been commissioned by the publishers Thomas Agnew & Sons to photograph people of interest in the Crimea for use as source material for a painting by the artist Thomas Barker. However, Fenton’s photographs of bleak terrains and exhausted soldiers would have a profound impact and marks one of earliest examples of war photography.

When Roger Fenton arrived in the Crimea in March 1855, the war had been fought for 12 months and many of the major battles of the campaign had already been fought. Fenton spent three months producing approximately 360 photographs, travelling and working in a mobile darkroom that he had converted from a wine merchant’s van. To a public that had been given selected information about the ‘great’ campaign and the famous Charge of the Light Brigade, Fenton’s photographs were a stark reminder of the horrors of war.

In his most famous photograph, Valley of the Shadow of Death (23 April 1855), he places the viewer at the bottom of a barren ravine littered with cannonballs leaving it to the viewer’s imagination to create a picture of past events.

Britain sent 98,000 men into the conflict and Fenton spent several weeks photographing the key figures of the war. One of his best-known portraits, The Council of War (June 1855), shows the three commanders of the allied armies – Lord Raglan, Maréchal Pélissier and Omar Pasha preparing for an assault on the Russian fortifications. An exhausted looking Lord Raglan died shortly after the image was taken.

One of Fenton’s more haunting images in the exhibition is Lord Balgonie (1855), who seems to be suffering from some kind of psychological problem associated with the conflict.

The majority of Fenton’s portraits depicted senior officers, however he did photographs troops on the frontline usually around the cooking facilities or showing the after effects of battle.

Although Fenton did not produce scenes of battle and death, he photographs were a stark contrast to artistic depictions of battle which tended to glorify the conflict. Fenton returned to Britain in July 1855, and in September his Crimean photographs went on display at the Water Colour Society on Pall Mall. The images raised awareness of the conditions endured by soldiers and Queen Victoria took a personal interest in the conflict and the welfare of the troops. The exhibition features a 1856 painting by John Gilbert which shows Queen Victoria meeting wounded soldiers in Buckingham Palace in 1855.

This interest was translated into practical action when she became the first British monarch to meet and support wounded soldiers in public, personally greeting troops at Buckingham Palace and during visits to hospitals. She also instituted the Victoria Cross, which remains the highest award for gallantry in the British Armed Forces.

This thought-provoking exhibition provides some insights into how the advent of photography changed many of preconceptions of how war was presented to the public. Fenton’s photographic technical and practical skill created a body of work which amazes the modern viewer. It is important to remember that photography was still in its earliest development when Fenton travels to the Crimea and yet he produces portraits of considerable psychological depth and landscapes that live long in the memory.

Shadows of War: Roger Fenton’s Photographs of the Crimea, 1855 is at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, 9 November 2018 – 28 April 2019, with Russia: Royalty & the Romanovs.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

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Exhibition Review – Painting with Light: Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the Modern Age at Tate Britain from 11th May to 25th September 2016

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Tate Britain presents an exhibition which explores the relationship between British painters and photographers, the exhibition entitled Painting with Light covers a 70 year period in which painters and photographers began to question notions of beauty and art itself.

The exhibition brings together nearly 200 works to reveal the mutual influence of photography and painting includes works by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, JAM Whistler and John Singer Sargent. Many pioneers of early photographers are featured including David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, Roger Fenton, William Henry Fox Talbot and Julia Margaret Cameron.

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The first room explores the influence of JMW Turner on early photography, Turner’s Edinburgh from Carlton Hill is shown with a series of photographs by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson on the same subject matter. The work of photographer Robert Adamson with painter David Octavius Hill provides an early example of the two media working together for mutual benefits. David Octavius Hill’s iconic Disruption Portrait 1843-66 – a 12ft long painting featuring 457 portraits is exhibited outside of Scotland for the first time in over a century.

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The exhibition illustrates the way photography and painting began to influence each other in a wide range of subject matter,   John Everett Millais’s The Woodman’s Daughter and John Brett’s Glacier Rosenlaui inspired a number of photographers to explore nature and panoramic views.

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It was not just in Britain that the mutual influence of painting and photography was expressed, both artists and photographers travelled around Europe and the Holy Land to create work that was very popular in Victorian Britain. James Graham’s Nazareth from the North and William Holman Hunt’s Nazareth provide evidence of the close collaboration that often occurred.

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Gradually, photographers began to realise the commercial benefit of reproducing paintings, some of the highlights of the show is examples of three-dimensional photography, which incorporated the use of models and props to create a tableaux from popular works of the time, Henry Wallis’s Chatterton was a popular work to be used in this way and these stereographs became widely available to the general public, often being used as a form of after-dinner entertainment for middle class Victorian families.

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The relationship between photography and painting was sometimes based on the personal relationship of the photographer and the artist. Julia Margaret Cameron’s artistic friendships with George Frederic Watts and Dante Gabriel Rossetti are explored in a room devoted to their enigmatic portraits of each other and shared models, where works include Cameron’s Call, I Follow, I Follow, Let Me Die and Rossetti’s Beata Beatrix.

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Other areas covered include Life and Landscape, Atmosphere and Effect that compares Whistler’s and Langdon Coburn’s smoky Thames nocturnes . The room entitled Into Light and Colour illustrates it was not all doom and gloom, John Singer Sargent’s iconic Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose and Whistler’s Three Figure: Pink and Grey inspired photographers to look for beauty in gardens and flowers.

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In the final room, Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s iconic Proserpine hangs near to Zaida Ben-Yusif’s The Odor of Pomegranates to offer evidence of how in this period the definitions of beauty were being challenged and overthrown.

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This intriguing exhibition explores the little known relationship between painters and photographers and how it developed over a 70 year period. Like any new technology, photography looked to other media for inspiration and began to see the artistic and commercial merits of reproducing works of art and following popular trends. Artists began to see photography as a useful tool and often used photographs for inspiration. Gradually photographers began to be seen as artists in their own field and a number of collaborations with painters allowed for mutual benefit. This exhibition features a number of iconic paintings and photographs which provides plenty of interest for visitors and give valuable insights into one of the most exciting periods of British Art history.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the modern age

11 May – 25 September 2016

Adult £18.00 (without donation £16.30)

Concession £16.00 (without donation £14.50)

Under 12s go free (up to four per parent or guardian). Family tickets available

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Exhibition Review : Salt and Silver, Early Photography 1840 – 1860 at the Tate Britain – 25 February to 7 June 2015

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For those interested in early photography, recent exhibitions at the Science Museum and Queen’s Gallery have provided considerable interest. However this exhibition at Tate Britain entitled Salt and Silver, Early Photography 1840 – 1860 concentrates on the short period in which William Henry Fox Talbot creates and develops his photography process using paper coated in silver salts.
This is the first exhibition in Britain devoted to salted paper prints, one of the earliest forms of photography. This British invention, unveiled by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839 quickly spread around the world and created a whole series of photography genres that would eventually transform photography  into one of the most successful mediums in the world.

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The first room is mainly dedicated to photographs by William Henry Fox Talbot, his experiments created a series of photographs on paper that displayed the benefits of the method over the rival ‘daguerreotype’ method which recorded the image onto a silver plate.

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David Hill and Robert Adamson, Newhaven fisherman 1845

Soon others began to experiment and refine the salted paper method creating the beginning of an industry, one of the first successful photographic studios was established by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson in the mid 1840s.

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Edouard Baldus , Floods of 1856, Brotteaux Quarter of Lyon 1856

Variants of the salt print soon spread to Europe and was particularly popular in France , Edouard Baldus became specially well known and was commissioned by the French state to record historic landmarks. Many photographers explored the many aspects of everyday life and buildings, streets and people became popular subjects.

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Frederick Fiebig, Sugar Mill, Plain William, Mauritius

If modern life was a popular subject, so was the past, photographers took their camera’s all over the world to record ancient texts and monuments . One of the best known of these international photographers was Maxime Du Camp who travelled the world by train and ships , he often was the first person to photograph a number of important historical monuments.

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John S Johnson , One of Dr Kane’s Men. 1857

Photographing outside presented a number of problems, therefore it is perhaps not surprising that the earliest most popular use of the new medium was portraiture. It also offered considerable innovation, immortalising a wide array of people from all over the world.

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Unknown artist, Victor Hugo, 1853

The period  offers  some of the earliest celebrity portraits with Victor Hugo photogaphed in 1853, nude photographs also made an appearance  in the 1850s.

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Felix Nadar, Mariette , 1855

Roger Fenton was one of the early pioneers of photography and can be considered one of the first war photographers when he visit the Crimea. His photographs from the area are noted for their technical expertise and inventive compositions.

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Roger Fenton, Group of Croat Chiefs, 1855

As with most technologies, new developments render previous methods obsolete, however in the relatively short period of 20 years the salt print method dominated the world and showed the world in ways that had never been seen before.

It is very difficult for the modern viewer to understand a world without photographs, the medium is so much part of everyday life that few think about its origins. This fascinating exhibition illustrates that many of the photographic genres were present from the very beginning and the early pioneers were just as creative as their modern counterparts. In one respect it is remarkable that there is enough quality salt prints to exhibit, they are notoriously fragile and deteriorate badly over time.

This exhibition will appeal to those with an interest in early photography or photography in general and represents a rare opportunity to see some of the rarest and best early photographs of this type in the world.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

 If you would like further information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

Tickets

Adult £12.00 (without donation £10.90)
Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50)
Under 12s go free (up to four per parent or guardian). Family tickets available by telephone or in the gallery.

Combined tickets are available with Sculpture Victorious, and can be booked online via Sculpture Victorious.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Book Review : Drawn by Light ( Science Museum )

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To accompany  the new Drawn by Light exhibition at the Science Museum, the museum has produced a Drawn by Light Exhibition Catalogue book  which features many of the highlights of the exhibition.

In collaboration with the Reiss-Engelhorn-Museen in Mannheim, Germany, and with the support of The Royal Photographic Society, the Science Museum has made a selection of key treasures from the Royal Photographic Society (RPS) Collection’s extraordinary collection of over 250,000 images, 8,000 items of photographic equipment and 31,000 books, periodicals and documents.

The exhibition brings together the selected  200 highlights from the collection of the world’s oldest surviving photographic society and features  some of the greatest names in photography, past and present.

Gathering Water-Lilies, 1886, Peter Henry Emerson © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Gathering Water-Lilies, 1886, Peter Henry Emerson © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

The history of  The Royal Photographic Society is intrinsically tied to the development of photography itself.  Although  William Henry Fox Talbot  declined the presidency of the new society, there were a number of other photograph pioneers who did get involved, most notably Roger Fenton. Starting with printing a journal and holding exhibitions, the society began to promote photography to its many new participants and the wider public. Royal patronage from Queen Victoria and  Prince Albert added to the prestige of the society as the media began to develop  through the late 19th century. However the lack of suitable permanent headquarters and the failure to include all aspects of the media did mean that progress for the society in the 20th century was ad hoc and sporadic.

The steady growth of the society’s collection often led to problems of finding suitable spaces for exhibitions. The second section of the book illustrates the relationship between The Royal Photographic Society and the Science Museum  is a long and productive one. In 1858, the first exhibition  of photographs to be held in any British museum was held at the South Kensington Museum. Eventually the South Kensington Museum split into the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Science Museum.  In the 20th century especially the Society and the Science Museum collaborated on a number of exhibitions.

In the third section of the book consideration is given to the development of photography and how ‘the magic of a moment in time’ has became the outstanding pictorial medium of the last 175 years. Over that time  The Royal Photographic Society  collection has become a treasure trove of camera technology, photographic processes and examples of the many applications of photography. This diversity illustrates how what was seen as nothing more than a mechanical reproductive process has developed into an independent art form.

The rest of the book is taken up with plates that show this process in action, from its earliest photographs there have been photographers who have used the media for creative purposes.

Once processes and equipment became more widely available, the many different movements within the media began to take shape, early pioneer Roger Fenton was considered the first war photographer with his photographs of the Crimean War.  Linnaus Tripe began to experiment with architecture and light and Oscar Gustav Rejlander began to experiment with photomontage.

The Two Ways of Life, 1857, Oscar Rejlander © National Media Museum SSPL

The Two Ways of Life, 1857, Oscar Rejlander © National Media Museum SSPL

As in the exhibition, the book often shows photographs from different time periods about the same subject matter. Therefore we have an a study of architecture and light  by Linnaus Tripe from 1858 contrasted with a similar subject taken in New York by Paul Strand in 1916. Steve McCurry’s famous photograph Afghan Girl is contrasted with Walter Bird’s Eastern Madonna, whilst Roger Fenton’s The Valley of the Shadow of Death and Larry Burrows Operation Prairie show images of war taken over a century apart.

Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1984 © Steve McCurry

Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1984 © Steve McCurry

Photographer’s creativity in the medium is illustrated by Leon Demarchy’s impressionist photogaphs, Rudolf Koppitz’s stunning Bewegungsstudie, Philippe Halsman’s surreal picture of Salvador Dali, Angus McBean’s unusual portrait of Audrey Hepburn and Ansel Adams striking Aspen.

Bewengungsstudie, 1926, Rudolf Koppitz © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Bewengungsstudie, 1926, Rudolf Koppitz © National Media Museum, Bradford SSPL

Undoubtedly the ‘poster girl’ of the book and the exhibition is the extraordinary series of photographs of a young woman named Christina in 1913 by Lieutenant Colonel Mervyn O’ Gorman. The photographs were taken in 1913 yet seem  so contemporary they would not be out-of-place in a modern fashion magazine.

The exhibition and the book charts the development of photography from its origins to the present day, they both illustrate that at different stages of the media’s development it has produced remarkable photographers and iconic photographs. The Royal Photographic Society Collection is rightly considered one of the world’s greatest photography collections and rarely do the public have a chance to view many of their most treasured photographs at one time.

This interesting and lavishly illustrated book is a wonderful introduction to the collection and is invaluable to those interested in the development of a medium that has become such an important part of everyday life that it’s origins are often overlooked.

 Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like more information or buy a copy of the book, visit the Science Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Drawn by Light (The Royal Photographic Society Collection) at the Science Museum – 2 December 2014 to 1 March 2015

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The Science Museum presents a history of photography with their Drawn by Light: The Royal Photographic Society Collection exhibition, it includes over 200 iconic images from the last 160 years of photographic art.

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In 1858, the Royal Photographic Society held an open exhibition at The South Kensington Museum, which later became the Science Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum. Pioneers of photography whose work was exhibited at this first show from Roger Fenton to Lewis Carroll and Hugh Welch Diamond will now be displayed in Media Space alongside remarkable images from some of modern photography’s most influential figures such as Don McCullin, Terry O’Neill and Martin Parr.

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This exhibition will also showcase key artefacts from the history of the medium – Nièpce heliographs, Talbot’s camera lucida sketchbook, The Pencil of Nature (the first commercially published book to be illustrated by photographs) and seminal images such as Oscar Rejlander’s The Two Ways of Life.

The Royal Photographic Society, the world’s oldest surviving photographic society played an integral role in the development of Photography as a medium providing exhibitions, professional recognition and advice on the latest techniques. Its collection of 250,000 images is considered one of the world’s greatest photography collections and the highlights of the collection have selected for this widely anticipated exhibition.

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Lewis Carroll

Photography in its many guises is such an accepted part of the modern world, that it is difficult to comprehend a time when photography didn’t exist. However looking at many of the earlier photographs, it is important to remember that in its early stages most people were concerned with mechanical process of the photographs rather than being seen as an art form in its own right. Not surprisingly portraits and still life were often the most popular genres in a media that relied on the subject staying motionless to get  better quality photographs.

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Niepce heliographs  are considered the first photographs using light-sensitive materials to produce images directly on printing plates. The exhibition has three of these extremely rare heliographs, 25% of all the known heliographs that have survived.

Although it is widely considered that William Henry Fox Talbot is the father of modern Photography,  Louis Daguerre had developed his daguerreotype process at roughly the same. As usually happens with competing processes it was the ease of Fox Talbot against the more complex chemical process of Daguerre that proved more popular. One of the more interesting artefacts in the exhibition is an experimental ‘mousetrap’ camera used by Fox Talbot in 1835.

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The Valley of the Shadow of Death – Roger Fenton 1855

Once processes and equipment became more widely available, the many different movements within the media began to take shape, early pioneer Roger Fenton was considered the first war photographer with his photographs of the Crimean War. Linnaus Tripe began to experiment with architecture and light and Oscar Gustav Rejlander began to experiment with photomontage.

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As the media developed, so did the myriad of uses it was applied to, it became used for staged portraits, photojournalism especially exposing the ills of the society, documentary photography and towards the end of the 19th century avant garde experimental photography.

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The exhibition explores all these various movements up to the present day with a whole series of iconic photographs from photography’s most influential figures often pairing similar subject photographs of different time periods.

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Many of the photographs may be familiar, however there are some real surprises, the Chinese landscape by Chin San Long and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor jumping in the air by  Phillipe Halsman.

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The biggest surprise is series of photographs of a young woman named Christina in 1913 by Lieutenant Colonel Mervyn O’ Gorman. They are so contemporary, they could have been taken last week, she even wears a ‘hoodie’.

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For anyone interested in early photography or the history of photography, this exhibition is a ‘must see.’ It clearly illustrates that at different stages of the media’s development it has produced remarkable photographers and iconic photographs. The Royal Photographic Society Collection is rightly considered one of the world’s greatest photography collections and rarely do the public have a chance to view many of their most treasured photographs at one time.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more about the exhibition or to buy a ticket, visit the Science Museum website here

2 December 2014 – 1 March 2015, Media Space, Science Museum, London

Admission £8, Concessions £5 (including donation)

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Conflict, Time, Photography at Tate Modern – 26 Nov 2014 to 15 March 2015

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The Conflict, Time, Photography exhibition at Tate Modern brings together photographers who have looked back at moments of conflict, from the seconds after a bomb is detonated to 100 years after a war has ended. Staged to coincide with the centenary of the First World War, this major exhibition goes beyond the familiar notions of war reportage and photojournalism, by seeking to understand how the passing of time inspires photographers  to reflect on past events.

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The exhibition features conflicts from around the world, from the Crimean War up to the present day, but is concerned with revealing the impact of war over time, days, weeks, months and years after the fact. because the  works are ordered according to how long after the event they were created: images taken weeks after the end of the American Civil War are hung alongside those taken weeks after the atomic bombs fell on Japan in 1945.

Photographs from Nicaragua taken 25 years after the revolution are grouped with those taken in Vietnam 25 years after the fall of Saigon. The exhibition concludes with new and recent projects by British, German, Polish and Syrian photographers which reflect on the First World War a century after it began.

The exhibition time lines offer a interesting mix of photographic records which deal with the consistent theme that the consequences of conflict are immediate and far reaching. From the trauma of war can be seen in the eyes of Don McCullin’s Shell-shocked US Marine 1968 to  Shomei Tomatsu’s images of objects found in Nagasaki , the photographs offer a chilling reminder that for all our technological advances, war has been an unfortunate constant over  history and particularly in the last 100 years.

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The  horrors of war are not just illustrated by the destruction of buildings and landscapes. It is  documented by seemingly ordinary events and objects captured by Stephen Shore’s account of displaced Jewish survivors of the Second World War in the Ukraine,

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The exhibition offers the insight that the reminders of past conflicts are with us all the time and play an important part in many societies cultural make-up .

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Different conflicts  reappear from multiple points in time throughout the exhibition, whether as rarely-seen historical images or recent photographic installations. Each offering us a particular viewpoint.  Whether it is tanks in Berlin at the onset of the Cold War or the more personal reminders

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of  Nick Waplington’s 1993 close-ups of cell walls from a Prisoner of War camp in Wales.

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As part of Conflict, Time, Photography, a special room within the exhibition has been guest-curated by the Archive of Modern Conflict. Drawing on their unique and fascinating private collection, the Archive presents a range of photographs, documents and other material to provide an alternative view of war and memory.

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Artists included in the exhibition are:

Jules Andrieu, Pierre Antony-Thouret, Nobuyoshi Araki, George Barnard, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Luc Delahaye, Ken Domon, Roger Fenton, Ernst Friedrich, Jim Goldberg, Toshio Fukada, Kenji Ishiguro, Kikuji Kawada, An-My Lê, Jerzy Lewczyński, Emeric Lhuisset, Agata Madejska, Diana Matar, Eiichi Matsumoto, Chloe Dewe Mathews, Don McCullin, Susan Meiselas, Kenzo Nakajima, Simon Norfolk, João Penalva, Richard Peter, Walid Raad, Jo Ratcliffe, Sophie Ristelhueber, Julian Rosefeldt, Hrair Sarkissian, Michael Schmidt, Ursula Schulz-Dornburg, Indre Šerpytyte, Stephen Shore, Harry Shunk and János Kender, Taryn Simon, Shomei Tomatsu, Hiromi Tsuchida, Marc Vaux, Paul Virilio, Nick Waplington, Jane and Louise Wilson, and Sasaki Yuichiro.

The Tate Modern in this exhibition uses photography to record the immediate and historical effect of conflicts. Using timelines offers a view of the same conflicts from many different perspectives, it also offers an opportunity to contrast conflicts over time. It also illustrates that you can repair buildings and landscape but the psychological trauma can last a lifetime. This exhibition of the work of many top photographers offers something quite different in a year that has seen many conflict related exhibitions to coincide with the centenary of the First World War.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more or buy tickets to the exhibition, visit the Tate Modern website here

Conflict, Time, Photography
26 November 2014 – 15 March 2015
Tate Modern, The Eyal Ofer Galleries, Level 3
Admission £13.10 (£11.30 concessions) or £14.50 (£12.50 concessions) with Gift Aid donation

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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