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Rodin: The Birth of Modern Sculpture at Bowman Sculpture – 7th June to 27th July 2017

Bowman Sculpture celebrates Auguste Rodin’s contribution to the history of art with The Birth of Modern Sculpture, an exhibition of over thirty works including a rare lifetime cast of the artist’s famed Eternal Spring (conceived in 1884) as well as a selection of his most renowned pieces such as The Thinker, The Kiss, Balzac and Man with a Broken Nose. The exhibition will also include original copies of letters written by Rodin and a number of drawings unseen in public.

Coinciding with the centenary of the death of Rodin (b. 1840 – d. 1917), The Birth of Modern Sculpture aims to underline Rodin’s enduring sculptural legacy with significant works ranging from the early years to his late abstracted figures.

Amongst Rodin’s earlier work, visitors will be able to see Maquette for The Burghers of Calais, which the sculptor first conceived in 1884 as the inspiration for his emblematic monument. Created as a homage to the brave citizens of Calais who sacrificed themselves to the invading English forces during the Hundred Years’ War (1337-1453), this rare model (cast in 1975) offers us a fascinating insight into the artist’s early concept for this commemorative public sculpture.

Among the extremely rare works on show is Rodin’s Fugit Amor, originally conceived in marble in 1887, and later cast in bronze for the Musée Rodin by the Alexis Rudier foundry in 1944. First realised as part of The Gates of Hell and inspired by the story of Paolo and Francesca from Dante’s Inferno, the two figures known as Fugit Amor can be seen twice on the right hand door. Another example of a notable work on display is The Abduction of Hippodamie (c1871), an early work part modelled by Rodin under the mentorship of Albert-Ernest Carrier-Belleuse (1824–1887). Depicting a centaur carrying a young woman, The Abduction of Hippodamie is a remarkable example of two sculptors collaborating with surprising effect.

The Birth of Modern Sculpture will also showcase three works from the later part of Rodin’s career such as his Mouvement de danse figures. The artist’s late dance figures have enjoyed a marked revival in interest, particularly in the UK, and the exhibition at Bowman Sculpture will be an opportunity to see a number of rarely-seen bronzes. Works such as Pas de Deux – Mouvement de Danse Type G, conceived in 1911, showing dancers with exaggerated poses is an excellent example of Rodin’s later move towards abstraction.

The Birth of Modern Sculpture will be staged in September at 1 Canada Square in London’s Canary Wharf, offering visitors another unique opportunity to see these beautiful works.

Bowman Sculpture is based at 6 Duke Street, St James’s, London, and is one of the foremost gallery’s in the world for sculpture by Auguste Rodin.

If you would like further information , visit the Bowman Sculpture website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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A Short Guide to the Victoria and Albert Museum

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The Victoria and Albert Museum (often called the V&A),  is the world’s largest museum of Decorative Arts and Design, housing a permanent collection of over 2.5 million objects.
The Museum owes its existence to the success of the Great Exhibition of 1851, profits from the Exhibition were used to establish the Museum of Manufactures and provide money to purchase exhibits.

The Museum moved to its present site in 1857 and was renamed the South Kensington Museum. The Museum buildings grew rapidly as did the collections including many forms of decorative art from all periods. It also acquired fine art especially paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture.

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In 1899, Queen Victoria laid the foundation stone of a new building designed to give the Museum a grand façade and main entrance. To mark the occasion, it was renamed the Victoria and Albert Museum, in memory of Prince Albert.

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Throughout the 20th century, the collections continued to grow until the present day and the Museum’s collections of ceramics, glass, textiles, dress, silver, ironwork, jewellery, furniture, sculpture, paintings, prints and photographs are considered some of the most important in the world.

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The museums incredibly diverse collections are not all related to the past, contemporary design is an important part of the V&A’s newer collections and exhibitions by modern designers are very popular.

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The Museum is vast and full of interesting objects, therefore it is worth going on a guided tour to discover some of the museums highlights.

Highlights

Tipu’s Tiger  is one of the V&A’s most popular exhibits. The wooden model of a tiger attacking a European was made for Tipu Sultan, ruler of Mysore in India, in the 1790s.

The Luck of Edenhall is a 13th-century Syrian glass beaker

Famous 12th-century Gloucester candlestick

A writing box  which belonged to Henry VIII and was made in 1525.

There are approximately 16,000 objects from China including a spectacular Qing dynasty carved lacquer imperial throne.

The Ardabil carpet at the V&A is the world’s oldest dated carpet (made in Iran in 1539)

The ‘Three Graces’ sculpture by Antonio Canova

The Great Bed of Ware is Britain’s most famous bed; made in the 1590s, it is over 11 feet long and ten feet wide, and is mentioned in Shakespeare’s ‘Twelfth Night’.

The museum has around 20 works by the sculptor Rodin, making it one of the largest collections of the sculptor’s work outside France; these were given to the museum by the sculptor in 1914, as acknowledgement of Britain’s support of France in World War.

One of the most unusual collections is the Cast Courts, two very large rooms that houses hundreds of plaster casts of sculptures, friezes and tombs. One of the rooms is dominated by a full-scale replica of Trajan’s Column, cut in half in order to fit under the ceiling.

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The V&A Café

The V&A Café is a popular spot for lunch with  hot dishes, salads, sandwiches, pastries and cakes, as well as hot and cold drinks, wine and beer. it is located in  the V&A’s original refreshment rooms, the Morris, Gamble and Poynter Rooms. These three rooms formed the first museum restaurant in the world. In the summer there is a Garden Café for drinks and snacks.

The V&A Shop

Equally popular is the  V&A Shop which offers a wide range of unusual products inspired by the V&A’s extensive collections. It has a series of gifts to suit all ages and pockets which include Jewellery, furniture, books, prints, textiles, toys, ceramics, fashion, design, glass and accessories.

Admission to the V&A is free

Although some exhibitions and events may carry a separate charge.
Museum opening hours
10.00 to 17.45 daily
10.00 to 22.00 Fridays (selected galleries remain open after 18.00)
Closing commences 10 minutes before time stated

Closed 24, 25 and 26 December

For more information about the V and A Museum, visit their website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here