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A Walk along the Regent’s Canal in London

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although the River Thames dominates the centre of London, there are other waterways that offer plenty of interest to visitors to London. The Regent’s Canal in the north of London takes walkers into London’s industrial past, past the famous Camden market, through Regent’s Park, past London Zoo and ends with a colourful collection of narrowboats at Little Venice.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal links the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal in the west, to the Limehouse Basin in the east. This section is around 13.8 kilometres (8.6 miles) long. However it is the section from King’s Cross to Paddington that is the most popular with walkers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal was designed by famous Regency architect John Nash who named the canal after his main patron, the Prince Regent, son of King George III who later become George IV. The canal was opened in 1820 and from the the mid 19th century, the canal had become busy and profitable. It was especially important for bringing timber, building materials and coal to King’s Cross Station from the industrial north. A new retail park behind King’s Cross Station called Coal Drops Yard uses some of the old storage warehouses. The canal as a working highway declined in the late 20th century and is mainly used now for leisure cruising and the tow path is used extensively by walkers and cyclists.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many walks start from behind King’s Cross Station near to the Camley Street Natural Park where the towpath goes to Battlebridge Basin, home of the London Canal Museum.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gradually you come across to the vibrant Camden Lock, Camden markets are world famous and one of London’s major attractions. It is great place to take a break and enjoy the wonderful selection of street food.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the delights of Camden comes the more peaceful Cumberland Basin, with its moored boats and quick succession of low road and rail bridges.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

From the scenic, we go exotic with a number of wild animals on the other bank inside London Zoo, high above the towpath is a huge aviary designed by Lord Snowdon.

Look out for ‘Blow Up Bridge’, a boat full of gunpowder exploded here in 1874 demolished the bridge and the bridge had to be rebuilt.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A more peaceful section take you around Regent’s Park, a number of white mansions line the canal with large gardens running down to the water.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The relative quiet of Regent’s Park is replaced by the more busy Warwick Avenue with plenty of moored boats before finishing at the pool of Little Venice which is a picturesque open space lined with boats and surrounded by Regency houses. Boat trips run from here, there is a boat café and even a Puppet Barge theatre.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

If you are looking for something different away from the usual tourist trails, a walk along Regent’s Canal offers a great deal of variety in a walk through the north of London.

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Camden Market Street Food

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Camden Markets are one of London’s most popular visitor attraction attracting around 100,000 people each weekend. One of the attractions of the market is the amazing range of Street food throughout the market, Camden is the Street food capital of London with a wide range of cuisines from around the world.

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Dutch Pancakes, Al Turko Kebabs, Brazilian Churrasco & Wild Game BBQ, Sushi Roll and Kimbab and Bit Bourbon Steamed Burgers are just a small selection of what’s on offer. Other notable stalls include

Circus Bros

Spanish food, filled tortillas and Serrano ham.Two professional chefs from Spain who want to revolutionize the street food concept and catering.

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Mama’s Jerk Station

Mama Jerk Station specialises in Caribbean Street food

Half Hitch Gin

The only micro distillery in Camden producing unique gin  flavoured with bergamot and tea from Malawi in East Africa.

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Wild Hives Raw Honey

Wild Hives honeys offer you wide range of premium quality raw honeys sourced from small scale independent beekeepers across Europe.

Pierogi Company

Authentic Polish pierogi (dumplings) and kielbasa (sausage).

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Banana Man

London’s finest Belgian chocolate dipped fruit

Brazilian Churros

Freshly made Churros filled with homemade ‘dulce de leche’ and chocolate fudge sauces.

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Camden Octopus

The unique flavours of Spain? delicious fresh octopus and seafood.

If you would like further information, visit the Camden Market website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Review : Camden Market


The Camden markets are a number of markets in Camden Town centred around Camden Lock, a wide range of items are sold including crafts, clothing, bric-a-brac and fast food. Camden Market is one of London’s most popular visitor attraction attracting around 100,000 people each weekend.

One of the original markets in Camden Town was operated in Inverness Street at the beginning of the 20th century which provided basic foodstuffs for the local population. In the 1970s, a small weekly crafts market began to operate every Sunday near Camden Lock. This market developed into a large complex of markets in a mixture of stalls and fixed premises. These markets originally operated on Sundays only, which continues to be the main trading day. Many of the traders open on Saturdays to make it a weekend market, a small number of traders in fixed premises do operate throughout the week.

The main markets include :

Camden Lock Market

Camden Lock Market is situated next to the Regent’s Canal on a site formerly occupied by warehouses connected with the canal. By the 1970s, the small crafts market became a well-known local attraction that attracted shoppers to the location. Eventually, the range of goods widened with stalls selling books, new and second-hand clothing, and jewellery, in recent years it has attracted a wide range of street food stalls.

The Stables Market

The Stables Market is located in the historic former stables and a Grade II listed horse hospital, many of the stalls and shops are located in large arches within railway viaducts. Stables Market has a number of clothes stalls, furniture and antiques.

Buck Street Market

With ‘The Camden Market’ sign over the Buck Street Market it is often considered the heart of the market, this outdoor market focusing almost exclusively on clothes.

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Inverness Street Market

The oldest street market in Camden still continues to have traders selling their wares but food and vegetables stalls have almost disappeared.

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The Camden markets attract large numbers of young people attracted by clothing and art pieces for alternative sub-cultures. The market has attracted independent designers and dealers specialising in unusual items especially fashion and music items. The late Amy Winehouse made her name in Camden in the various music establishments, to honour this connection, the market has a statue of the singer.

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Due to the popularity of the markets, the large visitor numbers at the weekends has led to the Camden tube station to  restrict Sunday afternoon access to incoming passengers only in order to prevent dangerous overcrowding of the narrow platforms. Visitors can use the nearby Chalk Farm and Mornington Crescent stations which are not subject to restrictions

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Camden Market Opening Times

Camden Market is usually open every day from 10am – 6pm

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to The Regent’s Park

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The Regent’s Park (including Primrose Hill) covers 197 hectares and like most of the other Royal Parks, Regent’s Park was part of the large area of land appropriated by Henry VIII. Marylebone Park, as the area was known, remained a royal domain until 1646. After the Civil War, the land was leased by the crown to tenant farmers until 1811 when the rapidly developing London made the area attractive to building.

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John Nash, architect to the crown and friend of the Prince Regent developed a masterplan for Regent’s Park which included a huge circle with a lake, a canal and the new royal residence inside. There was also a plan for 56 villas in the park and a series of grand Regency terraces around it.

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Although the masterplan was never completed, many elements of Nash’s scheme survived with eight villa’s and a series of grand Regency terraces built. The park was only used originally by the residents of the villas and terraces until 1835, when the east side the park was open to the public.

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The park was little changed for 150 years until formal Rose beds were developed in Queen Mary’s Gardens in 1930s.

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Running through the northern end of the park is the Regent’s Canal and it borders on London Zoo, but much of the park is open parkland with a wide range of facilities including gardens, a lake with a boating area, sports pitches, and children’s playgrounds.

See Video Review here

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here