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Exhibition Review: The Renaissance Nude at the Royal Academy from 3 March to 2 June 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts present a new exhibition entitled The Renaissance Nude which explores how nudes have been used in some of the world’s most renowned masterpieces. The Renaissance Nude exhibition features around 90 works in a variety of media including paintings, sculptures as well as drawings, prints and illuminated manuscripts from different regions of Europe.

The exhibition examines the emergence of the nude visual tradition and how it changed the character and values of European art. The exhibition feature works by artists including Lucas Cranach the Elder, Albrecht Dürer, Jan Gossaert, Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo da Vinci.

Although nude sculptures have been common since ancient times, nude paintings have a less obvious history. Religious organisations in particular were keen that nudes should inspire belief and not titillate the congregation. The Renaissance Nude exhibition examines art made in North and Southern Europe and considers some of the contrasts between the two approaches.

The exhibition is organised around five main themes, The Nude and Christian Art focuses on episodes from the Old and New Testament. Humanism and the Expansion of Secular Themes is devoted to mythological stories and classical art. Artistic Theory and Practice explores life drawing and the study of anatomy and proportion. Beyond the Ideal Nude looks at the vulnerability of the human condition. The final section, Personalising the Nude highlights the role of Renaissance patrons.

Even though, the exhibition covers a relatively short period between 1400 and 1530, it quickly becomes apparent that the idea of the ‘Renaissance Nude’ is a little misleading. Many people would consider Titian’s Venus Rising from the Sea (‘Venus Anadyomene’), c. 1520 as representative of this view, however the exhibition provides evidence that nudes were much more diverse and often reflected ideas of beauty within a particular cultural group.

Albrecht Dürer’s engraving Adam and Eve, 1504, Lucas Cranach the Elder’s A Faun and His Family with a Slain Lion, c. 1526 and Jan Gossaert’s Hercules and Deianira, 1517 offers a more medieval view of the nude. The remarkable Jean Bourdichon’s Bathsheba Bathing take from the Hours of Louis XII, 1498/99 illustrates that even in sacred texts, visions of womanly beauty could be included.

It was probably in the depiction of mythological stories and classical art, that the nude was used most extensively and experimentally. Agnolo Bronzino’s Saint Sebastian, c. 1533, Jan Gossaert, Christ on the Cold Stone, c. 1530 and Pietro Perugino, Apollo and Daphnis, c. 1495 offer unusual depictions.

There were a number of artists who wished to go beyond the surfaces both literary and emotionally, the exhibition includes some of Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings and drawings by Raphael and Michelangelo.

This intriguing exhibition gives viewers the opportunity to see the Renaissance Nude in a different light. As the nude became an increasingly dominant role in the visual arts, it was used in a variety of sacred and secular contexts. Whether used in small, intimate objects to large decorative projects that filled church interiors and palaces, the Renaissance Nude led to a series of developments that led to new ideas of humanity and the human form.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Bill Viola / Michelangelo at the Royal Academy – 26th January to 31st March 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents the work of the pioneering video artist, Bill Viola, with drawings by Michelangelo (1475 -1564) in an exhibition entitled Bill Viola / Michelangelo : Life, Death, Rebirth.  Both artists share a deep preoccupation with the nature of human experience and existence and the exhibition is  a unique opportunity to see major works from Viola’s career and some of the greatest drawings by Michelangelo, together for the first time. It is the first exhibition at the Royal Academy largely devoted to video art and follows Viola’s visit to the Print Room at Windsor Castle in 2006 to see Michelangelo’s famous drawings. The visit was a catalyst for this exhibition, which examines the affinities between the artists in seeking answers to some fundamental questions about life and death.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition is conceived as an immersive journey through the cycle of life, exploring the transience and tumult of existence and the possibility of rebirth. It opens with a group of works by both artists that reflect life and death,  Michelangelo’s The Virgin and Child with the Infant St John the Baptist, c. 1504-05, known as the ‘Taddei Tondo’ is featured opposite Viola’s Nantes Triptych, 1992 which consists of three screens that individually portray a woman giving birth, a figure floating and Viola’s own mother on her deathbed.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the highlights of the exhibition is Michelangelo’s remarkable ‘Presentation Drawings’ of the 1530s (Royal Collection, London), the drawings were produced for a Roman nobleman and feature personal ideas on the nature of love and life. The drawings feature allegories on the nature of love and life with subjects matters that include the labours of Hercules and the fall of Phaeton.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Playing opposite these drawings is the video of Viola’s Man Searching for Immortality/Woman Searching for Eternity, 2013 . Life-size images of a nude ageing man and woman are projected onto two black granite slabs like elderly Adam and Eve.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Viola’s Sleep of Reason 1988, The Reflecting Pool 1977-79 and Surrender 2001 offer differing views of reality taking the familiar but giving a glimpse of other worlds lurking in the background.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final galleries include a series of works that consider mortality and the possibility of rebirth. These include Michelangelo’s drawings of the  Crucifixion and Viola’s epic works; the five screen installation Five Angels for the Millennium, 2001 and the large projections Fire Woman, 2005  and Tristan’s Ascension (The Sound of a Waterfall Under a Mountain), 2005.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating and thought-provoking exhibition offers a contrast between Viola’s large installations and Michelangelo’s small and intimate works. In the darkness of the galleries, Michelangelo’s drawings are illuminated which builds on the religious and classical imagery.  In comparison Viola’s large videos seem abstract and less defined, although they do offers some ideas of the nature of reality.  Both artist’s are finally consumed by the idea of the body as a vehicle for that final journey, they depict bodies falling and rising in an endless cycle towards the unknown.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Bill Viola / Michelangelo at the Royal Academy – 26th January to 31st March 2019

The Royal Academy of Arts brings together the work of the pioneering video artist, Honorary Royal Academician Bill Viola, with drawings by Michelangelo (1475 -1564). Though working five centuries apart and in radically different media, these artists share a deep preoccupation with the nature of human experience and existence. Bill Viola / Michelangelo will create an artistic exchange between these two artists and will be a unique opportunity to see major works from Viola’s long career and some of the greatest drawings by Michelangelo, together for the first time. It will be the first exhibition at the Royal Academy largely devoted to video art and has been organised in partnership with Royal Collection Trust.

The exhibition will comprise 12 major video installations by Viola, from 1977 to 2013, to be shown alongside 15 works by Michelangelo. They include 14 highly finished drawings, considered to be the high point of Renaissance drawing, as well as the Royal Academy’s ‘Taddei Tondo’. It will propose a dialogue between the two artists, considering Viola as an heir to a long tradition of spiritual and affective art, which makes use of emotion as a means of connecting viewers with its subject matter. It also aims to recapture the spiritual and emotional core of Michelangelo, beyond the awesome grandeur of his works.

Viola first encountered the works of the Italian Renaissance in Florence in the 1970s where he spent some of his formative years. A residency at the J Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, in 1998 renewed his interest in Renaissance art and in the shared affinities with his own practice. In 2006, Viola visited the Print Room at Windsor Castle to see Michelangelo’s exquisite drawings, which he had known in reproduction since his youth. The meeting proved a catalyst for the exhibition, which evolved as a conversation between Viola and Martin Clayton, Head of Prints and Drawings at Royal Collection Trust. Rather than setting up direct comparisons between the artists, or suggesting that Michelangelo has been an instrumental influence on Viola’s work, the exhibition will examine the affinities between them, bringing together specific works to explore resonances in their treatment of the fundamental questions.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review : Michelangelo and Sebastiano at the National Gallery – 15th March to 25th June 2017

The National Gallery presents the first ever exhibition which explores the creative partnership between Michelangelo (1475-1564) and Sebastiano del Piombo (1455-1547).

The exhibition features loans from some of the most prestigious art galleries in the world including the only marble sculpture by Michelangelo in Great Britain – The Virgin and Child with the Infant St John, also known as the Taddei Tondo from the Royal Academy, some of the paintings and objects have not left their collections for centuries. There are around seventy works in the exhibition including paintings, drawings, sculptures and letters related to Michelangelo and Sebastiano.

It was in 1511, Sebastiano, a talented Venetian painter, arrived in Rome. He met Michelangelo, who was working on the Sistine Chapel ceiling at the time and the two quickly became friends. The friendship developed into a working collaboration with Michelangelo providing drawings and conceptual ideas. The work produced by Michelangelo and Sebastiano rivalled the work of rival Raphael who had dominated painting in Rome in this period. The friendship between the two artists lasted over twenty-five years before they fell out apparently arguing over a painting technique

One of the highlights of the exhibition is the Lamentation over the Dead Christ, also known as the Viterbo Pietà (about 1512–16). This painting was Michelangelo and Sebastiano’s first collaboration and represents their combined vision of a large-scale nocturnal landscape. The Lamentation will be united with Sebastiano’s Christ’s Descent into Limbo (1516) from the Museo del Prado, Madrid, and Francisco Ribalta’s 17th-century copy of Sebastiano’s lost Christ Appearing to the Apostles. The three paintings will be presented in their original triptych format for the first time since they were separated in 1646.

The success of the Viterbo Pietà led to two major commissions, both of which were completed with the help of Michelangelo, the decoration of the Borgherini Chapel in S. Pietro in Montorio, Rome (1516–24) and The Raising of Lazarus (1517–19).

The exhibition includes a three-dimensional reproduction of the Borgherini Chapel in S. Pietro in Montorio, Rome created using state of the art digital imaging and reconstruction techniques.

The Raising of Lazarus is an important part of the National Gallery history becoming part of the foundational group of paintings in the Gallery in 1824, where it was given the very first inventory number, NG1. Scientific research on The Raising of Lazarus suggests that Sebastiano’s contribution to be more substantial than previously assumed with Michelangelo revising drawing at a relatively advanced stage.

Among other exhibition highlights is The Risen Christ by Michelangelo, a larger-than-life-size marble statue carved by Michelangelo in 1514–15 lent by the Church of S. Vincenzo Martire, Bassano Romano (Italy). The Risen Christ will be shown with a 19th-century plaster cast after Michelangelo’s second version of the same subject (1528–21), which usually resides in the S. Maria sopra Minerva, Rome.

Sebastiano’s Visitation from the Louvre, Paris, and the Lamentation over the Dead Christ from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, leave their collections for the first time to travel to the exhibition.

This fascinating exhibition charts the two artists friendship against the background of considerable political, religious and social turmoil in Italy. Whilst Michelangelo’s reputation is still strong , Sebastiano has been largely forgotten under the assumption that he played a minor role in the collaborations with his more well-known partner. This exhibition goes some way to reappraise the importance of an artist considered the equal of Raphael in his time.

Our Video Review available here

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Painters’ Paintings : From Freud to Van Dyck at the National Gallery from 23rd June to 4th September 2016

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The National Gallery presents an exhibition that explores great paintings from the perspective of the artists who owned them. The eighty works on display span over five hundred years of art history and allows visitors a rare opportunity to enter the private world of these painters and to try to understand the motivations of artists as collectors of paintings.

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The National Gallery since its creation has acquired a number of important paintings which once belonged to celebrated painters: Van Dyck’s Titian; Reynolds’s Rembrandt, and Matisse’s Degas among many others. For the exhibition it was decided to bring together a series of case studies each devoted to a particular painter-collector. The artists included in the exhibition are Freud, Matisse, Degas, Leighton, Watts, Lawrence, Reynolds, and Van Dyck. Works from these artists’ collections are juxtaposed with a number of their own paintings, highlighting some of the connections between the artist and the art they possessed.

Half the works in the exhibition are loans from public and private collections, from New York and Philadelphia to Copenhagen and Paris. A number of them have not been seen in public for several decades.

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In the first room is the painting that provided the inspiration for this exhibition, Corot’s Italian Woman, was left to the nation by Lucian Freud following his death in 2011. It was the interest that surrounded this painting when its was acquired by the National Gallery that provided the focus on the many connections between artists.

Other Lucian Freud’s work in the room illustrate how the artist used some of his collection to explore his own work, most obviously if you compare Cézanne’s (Afternoon in Naples, 1876–77) with Freud’s After Breakfast (2001). Perhaps a surprise is this particular room is the Constable portrait (Laura Moubray, 1808).

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Henri Matisse started acquiring pictures long before he had encountered success and his collection includes many gifts and exchanges with fellow artists. He exchanged pictures with Picasso and the exhibition features Picasso’s Portrait of Dora Maar (1942). One of the works by Cézanne, Three Bathers (1879–82 ) which had a huge significance for Matisse who kept it for 37 years and regarded it has one of the great pieces of art. Dominating the Matisse room is the remarkable Degas’s Combing the Hair (about 1896) whose rich and vivid colours provided inspiration for Matisse’s own work.

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Edgar Degas was considered one of the greatest collectors of his time, buying paintings from artists he admired from the past including Ingres and Delacroix. He also bought from his contemporaries especially Manet collecting the dispersed sections of The Execution of Maximilian (about 1867–8,) after the death of his friend.

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Whilst the French painters in the exhibition were happy to buy work from their own time, the British painters tended to look to the past especially the Italian Renaissance. Frederic, Lord Leighton and George Frederic Watts were well-known figures in the British art establishment, Leighton in his Holland Park house assembled of pictures and objects he had purchased. Among them were Italian Renaissance painting , Jupiter and Semele ( possibly by Tintoretto about 1545). Watts, Leighton’s friend  had his own striking Renaissance painting, Knight of S. Stefano (probably Girolamo Macchietti, after 1563). Sir Thomas Lawrence was one of the leading British portraitist of the early 19th century and built a vast collection, once again he tended to look to the past with Carracci’s A Woman borne off by a Sea God (?) (about 1599 ), Raphael’s Allegory (about 1504) and Reni’s Coronation of the Virgin, (about 1607).

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Sir Joshua Reynolds was the inaugural President of the Royal Academy and was one of the most significant figures of the British art world in the 18th century. His collection was formed as a resource for his teaching and supported his ideas about what constituted great art. Works by Van Dyck, Giovanni Bellini, Michelangelo, Poussin and Rembrandt all reflect the high status of Reynolds, however a painting from his rival Gainsborough’s Girl with Pigs (1781–2) suggests a competitive streak to his nature.

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Sir Anthony van Dyck was England’s leading court painter in the first half of the 17th century and had worked in the studio of Rubens. Van Dyck built up an impressive collection of Italian pictures, his real passion was the work of Titian whose Vendramin Family (1540–5) and Portrait of Gerolamo (?) Barbarigo (about 1510) dominate the final room.

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This is a fascinating exhibition that features a number of remarkable works from artists that span five hundred years of art history. However it is often the intriguing stories behind the painting that illustrates the many ways that art can inspire other artists. Artists are susceptible to many influences from the past and the present and it is often possible to trace moves in their own artistic development from the works of art they possessed. This exhibition offers a unique perspective into the multi-layered connections between artists and the how collecting pieces of art can often provide a wide variety of financial and artistic reward.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Opening hours

Daily 10am–6pm (last admission 5pm)

Fridays 10am–9pm (last admission 8.15pm)

Admission

Full price                                                                                          £12.00

Senior/Concession/Disabled visitors (carers FREE)             £10.00

Job seeker/Student/Art Fund/12–18s                                       £6.00

Under 12s (ticket required)                                                           FREE

Members go free           

For more information or to book tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Defining beauty: the body in ancient Greek art at the British Museum from 26 March to 5 July 2015

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The British Museum’s major exhibition on the human body in ancient Greek art explores the Greek’s relationship  and  preoccupation with the human form.  The works of art in the exhibition covers a  wide range from the simplicity of prehistoric figurines to the complex realistic figures from  the age of Alexander the Great.

The exhibition will feature around 150 objects, including some of the most impressive Greek sculpture to have survived from antiquity.  Much of the knowledge we have of Greek sculpture is usually not from the originals but from copies made by the Romans. The exhibition  includes many of these copies  but  there are many original  works in terracotta, bronzes and  vases that demonstrate the skill of ancient Greek craftsmen. The British Museum possesses one of the most important collections of Greek art in the world and for the first time six Parthenon sculptures will be taken out of the permanent Parthenon gallery  and  shown alongside extraordinary loans from other world-class collections.

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In the first room we are confronted initially by the backside of Aphrodite and by an original Greek bronze sculpture of a nude athlete raised off the seabed near Lošinj, Croatia in 1999, this rare survivor  is shown for the first time in Britain after years of conservation.

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As an example of the work of the sculptor Phidias, the river god Ilissos is shown  together with the work of two of the sculptor’s contemporaries; the Townley Discobolus, a Roman copy of the lost original by Myron, and Georg Römer’s reconstruction of the Doryphoros by Polykleitos. The three great sculptors of the age, Myron, Polykleitos and Phidias, were said to have been trained by the same master and  competed amongst themselves  to raise the standard of  Greek sculpture to extraordinary levels.

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The next few rooms seek to place these works in the context of the Greek world and offer some insights into the development of Greek art over time. After the classic sculptures of the first room, the brightly coloured statues of the second room as a bit of a surprise. However, there is considerable evidence that many statures were painted and decorated with jewellery, weapons and armour.

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The room entitled Men like gods explores the relationship between the Greek people and their gods. Herakles was one of the most popular heroes and is often portrayed on vases and friezes. Gods and Goddesses  were usually in human form and often possessed superpowers but also had flaws that would often bring about their downfall.

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Within the exhibition, it is often the smaller pieces and images on pots that show  the everyday life of Greek society. Pieces were often produced for comedic effects with grotesques and other traits shown, small sculptures of Socrates were often produced to poke fun at his life and ideas.

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It is within the next few rooms  that you perhaps get closer to the Greek mind-set , the pursuit of beauty was part of a wide world view that  pursued a balance and harmony between different forces.  The section on Beauty and the beast plays with images of mythical monsters but often suggest that it is fight between civilisation and barbarism that is really at stake.

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This idea of civilised ideas and culture survived the collapse of the various Greek Empires and became a dominant  thread in European history.

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During the Renaissance, Greek art greatly influenced many of the artists and the final room brings together these two strands. Michelangelo considered  the Belvedere Torso,  the finest fragment of classical sculpture that could be seen in his day.  He used to visit the figure in the Vatican to produce pictures of Adam for the Sistine Chapel ceiling, one of the drawings is next to the sculpture.  To compliment the Torso, there is an important piece of Greek Art in the room,  a reclining nude figure from the East pediment of the Parthenon from the school of Phidias .

This extensive and intriguing  exhibition  reminds us of the ways in which Greek art and ideas have been responsible for defining beauty and ideas of a civilised life.  Even in the present age, attractive men and women are considered to look like ‘Greek gods’ or ‘goddesses’. But as the exhibition illustrates that is only a small part of a civilisation whose pursuit of ideals and beauty were a part of a larger world view in which order, balance and harmony were the main goals.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more about the Exhibition or buy tickets, visit the British Museum website here

Defining beauty: the body in ancient Greek art

26 March – 5 July 2015

British Museum

Tickets £16.50, children under 16 free
Opening times
Monday–Thursday 10.00–17.30
Friday 10.00–20.30
Saturday–Sunday 09.00–17.30

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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A Short Guide to the National Gallery

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In April 1824 the House of Commons agreed to pay £57,000 for the picture collection of the banker John Julius Angerstein. His 38 pictures were intended to form the core of a new national collection which would be housed in a new building.
In 1831, Parliament agreed to construct the building for the National Gallery at Trafalgar Square which finally opened in 1838. The National Gallery had free admission and wished to appeal all sections of society. However its success led to calls to expand the building and subsequent wings were added in 1876, 1907, 1975 and 1991.

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Although the collections of John Julius Angerstein and Sir George Beaumont provided the bulk of the National Gallery, in 1855 the new director Sir Charles Eastlake travelled throughout Europe to purchase pictures for the collection. Within 10 years  the Gallery’s collection of Italian painting was considered  one of the best in the world.

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When the artist Joseph Mallord William Turner bequeathed over 1000 paintings, drawings and watercolours to the collection in 1856, it was  decided to exhibit British works in a separate premises. Eventually a site was found at Millbank and the Gallery opened in 1897. The new gallery was officially known the National Gallery of British Art, changing its name to the National Gallery, Millbank in 1917. The wealthy industrialist, Henry Tate, offered his collection to the nation and funded the gallery which led to the gallery later becoming known as the Tate Gallery. Therefore ironically the National Gallery at Trafalgar Square only possessed a small selection of British pictures as the majority were transferred to the Tate which up to 1955 was under the administration of the National Gallery.

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The National Gallery Collection contains over 2,300 works, including many famous works, such as van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait, Velázquez’s Rokeby Venus, Turner’s Fighting Temeraire and Van Gogh’s Sunflowers.

All major traditions of Western European painting are represented from the artists of late medieval and Renaissance Italy to the French Impressionists.
13th- to 15th-century paintings
Duccio, Uccello, van Eyck, Lippi, Mantegna, Botticelli, Dürer, Memling, Bellini
16th-century paintings
Leonardo, Cranach, Michelangelo, Raphael, Holbein, Bruegel, Bronzino, Titian, Veronese
17th-century paintings
Caravaggio, Rubens, Poussin, Van Dyck, Velázquez, Claude, Rembrandt, Cuyp, Vermeer
18th- to early 20th-century paintings
Canaletto, Goya, Turner, Constable, Ingres, Degas, Cézanne, Monet, Van Gogh

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Highlights

A Young Woman standing at a Virginal -Johannes Vermeer about 1670-2

Bacchus and Ariadne – Titian  1520-3

Bathers at Asnières – Georges Seurat  1884

Doge Leonardo Loredan – Giovanni Bellini  1501-2

Equestrian Portrait of Charles I – Anthony van Dyck  about 1637-8

Mr and Mrs Andrews – Thomas Gainsborough about 1750

Samson and Delilah – Peter Paul Rubens about 1609-10

Seaport with the Embarkation of Saint Ursula – Claude 1641

Self Portrait at the Age of 34 – Rembrandt 1640

Sunflowers – Vincent van Gogh 1888

The Ambassadors – Hans Holbein the Younger 1533

The Arnolfini Portrait – Jan van Eyck 1434

The Battle of San Romano – Paolo Uccello probably about 1438-40

The Entombment – Michelangelo about 1500-1

The Fighting Temeraire –Joseph Mallord William Turner 1839

The Hay Wain – John Constable 1821

The Madonna of the Pinks (‘La Madonna dei Garofani’) – Raphael about 1506-7

The Toilet of Venus (‘The Rokeby Venus’) – Diego Velázquez 1647-51

The Virgin of the Rocks from Panels from the S. Francesco Altarpiece, Milan

Leonardo da Vinci about 1491/2-9 and 1506-8

The Wilton Diptych – English or French (?)about 1395-9

Venus and Mars – Sandro Botticelli about 1485

Admission Free
Opening hours: Daily 10am – 6pm
Friday 10am – 9pm
The National Gallery
Trafalgar Square, London WC2N 5DN

 For more information visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here