Home » Posts tagged 'London' (Page 2)

Tag Archives: London

Formula E Visa London ePrix at Battersea Park – June 27th and 28th 2015

Motor Racing arrives in London with The Visa London ePrix which will encompass two races – Rounds 10 and 11 – taking place at Battersea Park on Saturday 27 and Sunday 28 June.

london_original_map_extended-01

Formula E is a new FIA single-seater championship and the world’s first fully-electric racing series. The 2.922km anti-clockwise circuit has been designed using the existing perimeter roads of the park and will see the 20 Formula E drivers tackle a mixture of fast straights, high-speed bends, challenging chicanes and braking zones. It has been designed by British architect Simon Gibbons who has nine years’ experience as a circuit planner for Formula 1 . As the final two rounds of the inaugural 2014/2015 season, the Visa London ePrix could well be where the championship title gets decided.

_L5R1179

The London races are part of the Formula E’s inaugural season which started in Beijing in September 2014 and runs until June 2015, competing in 10 of the world’s leading cities including Miami, Berlin and London. A total of 10 teams, each with two drivers, race on temporary city-centre circuits creating a unique and exciting series designed to appeal to a new generation of motorsport fans. Formula E also promotes a vision for the future of the motor industry developing the electric vehicle to promote clean energy and sustainability. Next season two, Formula E will operate as an ‘open championship’, allowing teams and manufacturers the opportunity to showcase their own electrical energy innovations. Working to the technical specifications set out by the FIA, teams will focus their efforts on improving and developing the cars and battery technology.

_W2Q0166

For the London ePrix there will be facilities all around the Battersea Park but there are 3 main ticketing options – Gold, Silver, and Bronze. All tickets are general admission and allow spectators freedom to walk around the park on designated footpaths and entry to the eVillage.

The Gold ticket (£224) is a package of food, and soft drinks (served in designated area) and exclusive access to the executive raised standing platform.   Breakfast, Lunch and soft drinks throughout the day are included in this package.
This is the only ticket option that offers a seating area inside the venue however the live on-track action cannot be viewed from this location.  The race will be shown live on TV screens or if preferred to witness the on-track action a reserved raised standing platform is exclusively available to Gold ticket holders.

The Silver ticket (£56) gives standing access to a raised platform on the location you chose when purchasing your tickets.

These platforms are raised from ground level and rise up the further back you go, this is to ensure everyone has a good view of the on-track action and reduces the potential for restricted viewing.

The Bronze ticket (£22.40) allows access into one of the three designated standing zones (A, B, and C).

If you just want to experience the buzz of being at a race in London, with a limited possibility of seeing the track but with full access to the eVillage fan entertainment zone and jumbo screens, Blue tickets have also just gone on sale priced at £8.

If you would like more information or book tickets , visit the FIA Formula E website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Book Review – Make My Day : London ( Lonely Planet Publications)

Make_My_Day_London_Large

Lonely Planet  published a new series of travel guides in April, called Make My Day, the series launches with six guides (Barcelona, London, New York, Paris, San Francisco and Tokyo), with six more planned for later in the year.

Lonely Planet is one of the world leaders in travel guides and the Make My Day: London  guide is an addition to their other London guides. However this guide has a quite unique format that allows the visitor to mix and match your itinerary for the day. The spiral-bound guide is divided into three sections with options for morning, afternoon and evening activities, the reader then flips though the pages to build a customised day itinerary. With over 2000 itinerary combinations, there is plenty of choice available to suit all tastes.

Lonely Planet having a wide knowledge of London and utilise this insider information to select the city’s must-see sights and experiences. Each attraction has a short description, a full colour image, restaurants and cafes close to your chosen destinations and a small map and transport planner that help you get your bearings and navigate between sights. One of the options may be a morning at the British Museum, spend the afternoon at Tate Modern before enjoying a West End show in the evening. However the guide puts the reader in control to build an itinerary to their particular interests.

The second part of the guide is small snapshots of essential need-to-know information about transport, shopping and general information. Finally there is a free, convenient pull-out London map.

This innovative approach to travel guides is probably targeted  to visitors who may only have limited time to explore the many delights of London. However the guide offers a considerable amount of choice in a small portable form that is easy to slip in your pocket. Online guides are challenging the dominance of print guides, this guide has been designed to reflect that an increasing number of visitors  want quick, visual information instantly. An added bonus to customers who buy the book is that they will be able to access the corresponding in-app content for free.

If you like to spend lots of time pre-planning your itinerary, the other Lonely Planet London guides are probably better suited to your needs, but if you have limited time in London, this guide gives you all the relevant information to make the most of your stay. The informative and accessible format of the guide is an easy and fun way to plan your day.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like more information or buy Lonely Planet London Guides, visit the website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review – London: Architecture, Building and Social Change by Paul L. Knox (Merrell Publishers)

LondonJkt

London: Architecture, Building and Social Change by Paul L. Knox (Merrell Publishers)

London’s diversity is truly remarkable, not just in its population but also its urban landscape with buildings of different centuries and architectural styles often occupying the same district. It is this unique distinctiveness of London that provides the focus of this book, London: Architecture, Building and Social Change. However to fully understand London’s development, the author contends  you must consider its economic, social and architectural history.

Fundamental to any understanding of London’s development is its rather unique history, as the author points out  ‘London did not grow from a single commercial, ecclesiastical or administrative centre’ but rather ‘ has grown piecemeal from an archipelago of villages and town centres to become a conglomerate metropolis of interdependent districts with twin cores.” Over time every district within this metropolis developed its own distinctive cityscape and instantly recognisable landmarks.

To illustrate this point, the twin cores of London, the City of London and Westminster developed over time to take on particular functions, The City of London was a commercial centre from Roman times whereas it was not until the 11th Century that Westminster became the centre of royal justice and administration.

The author considers in London’s development, a series of events had a major effects on the course of that development. First of all was Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 1530s, which took land away from the church which was transferred into private hands, therefore establishing the Great Estates. The Great Fire of 1666 swept away much of medieval London and bought about considerable building works. The coming of the Railways in the 1830s and 1840s bought a disruptive technology which tore up some London suburbs and bought access to large areas of the suburbs. Just as disruptive was the Blitz and bombings of the 1940s which decimated certain areas that often took decades to recover from.

If major events changed the face of London, so did individuals and the author suggest that a particular cast of characters were mainly responsible for widespread change. Amongst this cast were landowners, developers, architects, engineers, reformers, philanthropists and mayors.

To illustrate this interplay between events, people and architectural styles in real life, the author selects twenty-seven districts to discover their own distinctive character and pedigree. In the context of London’s general development, the book then considers the district’s specific developments that highlights the continuities and change within the specific areas.

A number of the districts show little change especially those built by the great landowners of London, areas such as Belgravia, Mayfair, Chelsea, Kensington and Knightsbridge were built for the elites and due to their status managed to avoid much of the destructiveness of the railways and industrialisation. Unfortunately, the same could not be said of Camden and  Paddington whose initial rural status was decimated by the canals and railways.

If money and influence were mainly situated in the West London, there is little doubt that for much of the nineteen century, the negative effects of industrialisation such as  poverty, crime, disease and unemployment were concentrated in East London. The sections on Whitechapel, Hoxton, Shoreditch and Bethnal Green pay testament to the role that reformers and philanthropists played in these areas to create a safer and healthier environment.

In many ways the south bank of the Thames has been the poorer relation to the north and the sections on Borough, Southwark, Bankside and Lambeth illustrate that they were for centuries populated by industry and working class residential areas. However, the South Bank and Bankside’s more recent riverfront transformation as a location of entertainments is actually a return to the area’s function in medieval times onwards.

It is perhaps the areas between the extremes of wealth and poverty that show the greatest diversity, districts like Bloomsbury, Notting Hill, Bayswater and Clerkenwell have veered between various degrees of respectability and often attracted the artists, writers and academics who have documented the changing times. The same could said of Soho and Covent Garden, which became locations of respectable and not so respectable entertainments.

This is a remarkably readable and interesting book for anyone interested in the changing urban landscape of one of the world’s most enigmatic cities. It manages to be authoritative without being overly academic, the profile of the development of 27 distinctive districts, illustrated with over 500 original photographs provides a number of insights into the past, present and possible future developments of London. One of the major insights is related to the ongoing gentrification of London areas and the creation of London as a Global city.

This book is an essential reference book for anyone interested in London, written by a leading expert on urbanization. It offers a comprehensive overview of many of the major buildings and landmarks of the city  and provides the context to understand their importance in London’s general development.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended 

If you would like more information or buy a copy of the book , visit the Merrell website here.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : London, The Weekends Start Here – Fifty-two Weekends of Things to See and Do by Tom Jones (Virgin Books)

weekend

London, The Weekends Start Here: Fifty-two Weekends of Things to See and Do is the third book by Tom Jones. His two previous best-selling books, Tired of London, Tired of Life and Mad Dogs and Englishmen were inspired by his popular website entitled Tired of London, Tired of Life.

As the author points out, it is often at the weekend that the city really comes alive and to make the most of our free time, the book offers a wide range of cultural, artistic, historical and outdoor experiences.  London, The Weekends Start Here offers 52 themed weekends, organised by season, with over 250 interesting  entries for unusual and surprising attractions.

Many of the themed weekends celebrate London’s position as a global city which attracts residents and visitors from all over the world. Therefore you can explore American London, Japanese London, French London, Russian and East European London, Immigrant London, Italian London, Nordic London and discover the many contributions these groups have made and continue to make to the London story. If these particular groups are associated with London, so are individuals such as William Morris, Charles Dickens and John Betjeman who merit a section on their own.

You can discover different aspects of London History by following the guides on Wartime London, Pirates’ London, Revolutionary London, Political London and Ancient London. The book takes you away from the usual tourist spots of London by providing guides to the Countryside of Croydon, The Back Roads of Bexley and Bromley, Along the River Lea and the Highlights of Hackney.
London is famous for its cultural attractions and on your themed weekends you can discover Artistic London, Poets’ London, Musical London and Scientific London.

One of the attractions of the book is that each themed weekend offers a great deal of variety, if you explore Scientific London, suggestions include a visit to the Science Museum, Attend a lecture at the Royal Society, See the Broad Street Pump, Drink at the Devereux, Visit the Home of Time, Climb an Experimental Lighthouse and explore the Wellcome Collection.

There are over 250 interesting entries which offers a short description of the attraction with information about location and transport.  Also dotted throughout the book are a number of weekend tips including suggestions of the best places to eat and drink.

Many books about London offer a large array of attractions to visit, however the main attraction of London, The Weekends Start Here is that it applies a certain amount of logic to the enterprise. Rather than keeping you to a particular location, different themes can take you all over London following a particular interest. Alternatively if you do not wish to follow a particular theme, the book offers over 250 intriguing places to visit within the confines of the capital.

This well designed and informative book really does have something for everyone, whether you are a Londoner or a visitor. The weekend is a great time to explore London’s large number of attractions and even the most ardent lovers of London will find that the author has provided a number of unusual and relatively unknown attractions to explore.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more about the book or buy a copy, visit the Virgin Books website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

WOW – Woman of the World Festival at the Southbank Centre – 1st to 8th March 2015.

wow2015-poster_0

WOW – Women of the World is a global festival (1 – 8 March 2015) celebrating the achievements of women and girls and also looks at the obstacles that prevent them from achieving their potential and contributing to the world. With a diverse range of talks and debates, music and performance, parties, a marketplace, networking and much more, the festival brings together women and men to speak about how they are making the world a fairer place and why it matters.

WOW – Women of the World has happened in London, Derry-Londonderry, Cardiff, Cambridge, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ethiopia, New York, Australia and Baltimore.

This festival celebrates the achievements of women and girls and also looks at the obstacles that prevent them from achieving their potential and contributing to the world. The festival is celebrating  its fifth year and offers  a week of talks, debates, concerts, film, comedy and workshops.

Edinburgh Comedy Award winner Bridget Christie leads the comedy line-up, while WOW’s annual night of laughs and music, ‘Mirth Control’, will star Sarah Millican, Sandi Toksvig and Sue Perkins. Speakers will include Caitlin Moran, Eve Ensler, Annie Lennox, Juliet Stevenson, Gemma Cairney and Kirsty Wark and BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour will broadcast live from the festival.

There will be a large number of events with the following ticketing:

Free events, just turn up.
Everyone can attend these. You don’t need a WOW Day Pass* or additional ticket.

Free events, but ticket required.
These events are also free, but take place in smaller venues or spaces. We ticket them to keep an eye on numbers. You can get a ticket for free online or in person from our Ticket Office.

Day Pass* & 3 Day Pass** events.
A wristband is required to attend these. You are provided with one when you buy either a WOW Day Pass* or WOW 3 Day Pass**. (Please note, your Day Pass or 3 Day Pass does not give you access to Stand Alone events.)
Buy WOW Friday Day Pass (6 March only) – £20
Buy WOW Saturday Day Pass (7 March only) – £20
Buy WOW Sunday Day Pass (8 March only) – £20
Buy WOW 3 Day Pass (6 – 8 March) – £45

Stand Alone events.
These are not included in any WOW Day Pass* or the WOW 3 Day Pass**. A separate ticket needs to be purchased for these events.

For information about the many events, visit the Festival website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

London Top Restaurants – The Delaunay

delaunay_home
Location –  55 Aldwych, London, WC2B 4BB

The Delaunay follows the winning formula of the Wolseley and creates a version of the Grand European café with leather seating, dark wood, brass rails and  antique mirrors. However the food is anything but old fashioned whether it is in the café or the dining room. For those in a hurry, next door is the Counter (a café with takeaway facility).

897-headerimg

The Delauney offers a extensive range of Breakfast options including English and Viennese, brunch starts with typical breakfast Viennoiserie and egg dishes, and moving onto lunch-time classics. There is an extensive All Day à La Carte menu that includes a wide choice of dishes from platters of crustacea, to salads, and café classics such as choucroute à l’Alsacienne, moules frites and steaks, as well as a special selection of Wieners and Schnitzels. For those with a sweet tooth, there is  large array of cakes, slices, desserts and ice cream coupes.

474-the-delaunay-clock-tables

The Delaunay’s Viennese Afternoon Tea offers assorted savouries, poppy seed Gugelhupfs with apricot jam and whipped cream, a selection of classic Viennese cakes and choice of teas (or coffees) every day, as well as ice cream coupes, milkshakes and floats. All the pastries are made on the premises, with an ever-changing selection of cakes and slices, which might include a Lemon and Pistachio Millefeuille, a Sachertorte or a Coffee and Stroh Rum Cake.

718-the-delaunay-afternoon-tea-01-low-res

The Delaunay Viennese Afternoon Tea is £23.75 per person. Those wanting a lighter alternative can choose the Austrian Cream Tea at £10.75 per person or if you are celebrating The Delaunay Champagne Tea at £33.50 per person.

778-counter-collage10

The Counter at The Delaunay has its own separate entrance on Aldwych and serves take-out or eat-in food throughout the day. It still retains the grand cafés of Europe theme with  Viennoiserie, hot bacon sandwiches & homemade granola or bircher muesli for breakfast. Chicken soup with noodles, frankfurters, salads, salt beef pretzels, sandwiches available throughout the day. There are also cakes, savouries, scones and blend coffees, hot chocolates and teas.

The popularity of The Delaunay is that they do cover all the bases offering wonderful surroundings and high quality food and service. For all the nods to the past,  the establishment caters for the modern customer with plenty of options of meals and snacks throughout the day.

Opening hours

Monday – Friday7.00 am – last orders Midnight
Saturday8.00 am – last orders Midnight
Sunday9.00 am – last orders 11.00 pm

Dining times

Breakfast

Monday – Friday 7.00 am – 11.30 am
Saturday8.00 am – 11.00 am
Sunday9.00 am – 11.00 am

All Day à La Carte
Monday – Saturday 11.30 am – midnight
Sunday11.30 am – 11.00 pm

Afternoon Tea
Monday – Sunday3.00 pm – 6.30 pm

Brunch
Saturday – Sunday 11.00 am – 5.00 pm
Bank Holidays11.00 am – 5.00 pm

The Counter at The Delaunay

Monday 7.00 am – 7.30 pm
Tuesday to Friday7.00 am – 10.30 pm
Saturday10.30 am – 10.30 pm
Sunday11.00 am – 5.30 pm
Bank Holidays8.00am – 7.30 pm

 If you would like to find out more about The Delauney , visit the website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

All you need to know about the London New Year’s Day Parade – 1st January 2015

nye1111

After the New Year Eve celebrations in London, events for New Years Day always seem a little low key. However the London New Year’s Day Parade has grown considerably from its origins in 1987.

nye4444

The Parade offers an eclectic mix of pageantry, marching bands and contributions from all of the London Boroughs. Over 8,500 performers representing 20 countries world-wide will assemble for the 2015 Parade.

nye2222

There is always a number of American marching bands and cheerleaders who add a bit of razzmatazz to the proceedings. Although many people may be suffering hangovers from the night before, the parade regularly attracts crowds of two thirds of a million and has a large worldwide television audience.

nyeroute

The Parade starts at 12 midday on Piccadilly at the junction with Berkeley Street near Green Park Tube Station and finishes at 3.30 pm in Parliament Square. The Parade route is – Piccadilly, Piccadilly Circus, Lower Regent Street, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, Cockspur Street, Trafalgar Square, Whitehall and Parliament Street.

nye3333

An important part of the parade is raising money for charity and various charities have benefitted over the years. This year there will be series of concerts before and after the event involving a selection of bands and orchestras performing in different venues.

For more information visit the London New Year’s Day Parade website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Christmas in London’s Oxford Street 2014

DSCN8478

The West End of Oxford Street tends to be the location of many of the flagships stores of the main London department stores.

DSCN8462

Selfridges, House of Fraser, Debenhams, Mark’s and Spencer’s amongst others go to town with Christmas decorations to attract shoppers to their stores.

DSCN8471

However it is worth remembering in the weekends leading up to Christmas, Oxford Street gets incredibly busy and if you can shop at other off peak times you will probably get a better shopping experience.

DSCN8474

Many of the stores hold special Christmas Events and special promotional offers.

DSCN8466

 

CHRISTMAS OPENING TIMES

Monday – Friday

9.am – 9pm

Saturday

9:30am – 10pm

Sunday

11:30am-6pm

Christmas Eve

9am – 6pm

Christmas Day

Closed

Boxing Day

9am – 10pm

New Years Eve

9.30am – 6.30pm

New Years Day

11am – 7pm
*Some stores may vary

Typical bank holiday opening hours:
12pm-6pm

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : London, A Literary Anthology edited by Richard Fairman ( British Library Publishing)

london lit

It was Dr Samuel Johnson who said “when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.”  The many writers and poets who have written about London on the whole have agreed with his statement.

This literary anthology features a collection of poems and scenes from novels which range from the 15th century to the present day.

The anthology begins with the words of William Wordsworth ‘composed upon Westminster Bridge’  which describes the capital at peace in the morning, ” The City now doth, like a garment, wear.   The beauty of the morning : silent, bare.”

The peace is often a prelude to the mass influx of people coming into the city and the next section of the book considers the many impressions 0f the city recorded by numerous writers. These impressions range from Olivier Twist who considered the city ” A dirtier or more wretched place he had never seen”  to Charlotte Bronte’s Villette who states ” The city is getting its living – the West End but enjoying its pleasure. At the West End you may be amused, but in the city you are deeply excited.”

For many who enter the capital with no guide or friend, it is the sheer crush of people which highlight their feelings of loneliness. This is especially so if you stand out from the crowd, new Black Londoners, James Berry and Samuel Selvon illustrate these feelings of alienation in post war London.

London has always had a wide disparity of wealth and the book considers the ‘High Life’ with excerpts from Vanity Fair, The Way We Live Now and Vile Bodies. Many of these novels are concerned about fitting into the higher levels of British Society, where background and manners are the prerequisites for acceptance.

In contrast , the section into the ‘Low Life’ explores the dark sides of London life where the fight for survival  leads to the hidden depths of human existence. Not surprising Charles Dickens is our greatest guide with an excerpt from Bleak House. Virginia Woolf, Robert Louis Stevenson and Arthur Morrison also provide  evidence from the dingy streets and alleys.

Even from its  earliest days, London has been a multicultural city and the section named Living Together in London explores how waves of immigrants have made the city their home and left their impact in the many of the capital’s neighbourhoods.

Hanif Kureishi, Israel Zangwill and Zadie Smith gives voice to various communities who struggled to make the city their  own. If the integration of the many immigrants has not been seamless, it is remarkable that for most of the time  this integration  usually takes place without major problems.

London may inspire Hymns and Laments in equal measure but it is the capital’s ability to overcome the various disasters that have provided many writers with inspiration.

The chapter entitled Survival through Plague and Fire charts the two great calamities of the 17th century, the Great Fire of  London of 1666 and the visitation of the Plague.

John  Dryden recalls in verse, the Great Fire out of control , ” the flames impelled soon left their foes behind; and forward with a wanton fury went.”  Daniel Defoe offers some scenes from an altogether different unseen threat,  the plague decimated London but Defoe offers the humourous story of a piper who after a nights drinking is lying on the street and is thrown onto the dead cart to be taken away for burial. Fortunately he wakes up time but not without frightening the life out of the bearers carrying  the dead.

In the twentieth century, the threat to London was even greater, with the two World Wars and poets D H Lawrence, Robert Bridges and Mervyn Peake describe a city and country on the brink of the abyss.

In the Second World War especially , for many Londoners it must have seemed that the City was witnessing Visions of the Apocalypse and some writers used this precept as the theme for their novels, Richard Jeffries in ‘After London’ and H G Wells in ‘The War of the Worlds’ offers visions of London as a deserted city finally beaten into submission.

The reality is that whatever the challenges over the past two thousand years, London has survived and is ever-changing, the chapter taking up this theme includes the works of Tobias Smollett, Charles Dickens, John Galsworthy and Angela Carter.

As it was the dawn and morning that began the book it is the City at Night that brings it to its conclusion, W S  Graham poem The Night City offers a person walking though the city thinking of its connection with literature and the arts. ” The fire has burnt out. The Plague pits had closed; and gone into literature.”

This ending is rather apt because literature is part of the fabric of London life, we are constantly being reminded of writers and poets descriptions of the city.  Many people follow in the footsteps of the great writers both literally and metaphorically as they seek to find some understanding of London life.

This anthology is a combination of well-known texts and others that may be less familiar gives an intriguing balance that offer many insights into the London story. The texts are complimented by the illuminating  illustrations of London life taken from the British Libraries large collection. There are a number of anthologies on the market but this book offers more than most with interesting narratives, wonderful illustrations and attractive design.

This anthology would appeal to those who like to understand the connection between the city and literature, but also can be used as an introduction into this fascinating subject matter.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more about the book or buy a copy , visit the British Library shop here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

London Gastropubs – The Princess of Shoreditch

princess

76–78 Paul Street, London, EC2A 4NE

‘The Princess’ is the award winning Gastropub in Shoreditch clearly demonstrates that in the best Gastropubs you get the best of all worlds, a great pub and a great dining area all in  the same place

Refurbished in 2010 The  270 year old pub was refurbished in 2010 and has a downstairs bar which is available to both drinkers and diners alike and a walk up the spiral staircase leads you to the dining room.

Princess of Shoreditch

Food is sourced locally if possible, and meat is sourced from quality producers around the UK.

Princess of Shoreditch

Starters may include Chilled tomato & basil soup, Smoked haddock & salmon fishcake, poached egg, bearnaise  and Cod cheek scampi with wild garlic aioli .

Mains may include Chargrilled mackerel fillets, wild garlic, new potatoes & green sauce, or Trio of Kentish lamb; cutlet, rump & Shepherds pie, roasted carrots and Chart Farm venison haunch, Portobello mushroom & asparagus tart, split cherry tomato jus.

Desserts include Apple & rhubarb crumble, custard, or Chocolate fondant, vanilla ice cream  and Sticky toffee pudding, toffee sauce, vanilla ice cream.

Princess of Shoreditch

The Princess of Shoreditch has an extensive wine list and is well known for its Craft ales.

Opening Hours:

Monday to Saturday: Midday–11pm
Sunday: Midday–10.30pm

Kitchen Opening Hours:

Monday–Friday: Midday–3pm / 6.30pm–10.00pm
Saturday: Midday–4pm / 6.30pm–10.00pm
Sunday: Midday–9pm

BAR MENU

Tuesday–Friday: until 5.30pm

For more information , visit the Princess of Shoreditch Website here