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London Zoo reopened on Monday 12 April 2021

Photographs (c) ZSL London Zoo

The ZSL London Zoo reopened on Monday 12 April, three months after it closed to the public for the third national lockdown.

Photographs (c) ZSL London Zoo

Eager visitors who secured one of the limited sold-out tickets to the reopening formed a socially-distanced queue to enter the iconic 36-acre park, before safely following one of three carefully mapped out nature routes laid out across the site and enjoying the spring sunshine.

Photographs (c) ZSL London Zoo

The Zoo is limiting visitors to ensure social distancing and are accepting pre-booked tickets only. A one-way system is in place, with three prescribed routes ensuring guests remain socially-distanced while exploring. Catering outlets are takeaway only, and all payments will be contactless. Indoor exhibits, including the Reptile House and Rainforest Life will remain closed for now.

Photographs (c) ZSL London Zoo

ZSL London Zoo Social Distancing Measures

All visitors must book tickets in advance 

Contactless entry 

Limited visitors per day, split into morning and afternoon slots 

Takeaway food only available 

2m distancing markers in place around the zoo 

Three one-way trails to keep visitors flowing in the same direction 

Handwashing facilities and sanitiser available throughout the zoo 

Outdoor benches and tables meticulously cleaned throughout the day 

Animal talks have been suspended to avoid gathering crowds 

Indoor and walkthrough exhibits such as the Reptile House will not yet be accessible to the public. 

For more information or book tickets, visit the London Zoo website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Walk along the Regent’s Canal in London

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although the River Thames dominates the centre of London, there are other waterways that offer plenty of interest to visitors to London. The Regent’s Canal in the north of London takes walkers into London’s industrial past, past the famous Camden market, through Regent’s Park, past London Zoo and ends with a colourful collection of narrowboats at Little Venice.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal links the Paddington Arm of the Grand Union Canal in the west, to the Limehouse Basin in the east. This section is around 13.8 kilometres (8.6 miles) long. However it is the section from King’s Cross to Paddington that is the most popular with walkers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Regent’s Canal was designed by famous Regency architect John Nash who named the canal after his main patron, the Prince Regent, son of King George III who later become George IV. The canal was opened in 1820 and from the the mid 19th century, the canal had become busy and profitable. It was especially important for bringing timber, building materials and coal to King’s Cross Station from the industrial north. A new retail park behind King’s Cross Station called Coal Drops Yard uses some of the old storage warehouses. The canal as a working highway declined in the late 20th century and is mainly used now for leisure cruising and the tow path is used extensively by walkers and cyclists.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many walks start from behind King’s Cross Station near to the Camley Street Natural Park where the towpath goes to Battlebridge Basin, home of the London Canal Museum.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gradually you come across to the vibrant Camden Lock, Camden markets are world famous and one of London’s major attractions. It is great place to take a break and enjoy the wonderful selection of street food.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the delights of Camden comes the more peaceful Cumberland Basin, with its moored boats and quick succession of low road and rail bridges.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

From the scenic, we go exotic with a number of wild animals on the other bank inside London Zoo, high above the towpath is a huge aviary designed by Lord Snowdon.

Look out for ‘Blow Up Bridge’, a boat full of gunpowder exploded here in 1874 demolished the bridge and the bridge had to be rebuilt.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A more peaceful section take you around Regent’s Park, a number of white mansions line the canal with large gardens running down to the water.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The relative quiet of Regent’s Park is replaced by the more busy Warwick Avenue with plenty of moored boats before finishing at the pool of Little Venice which is a picturesque open space lined with boats and surrounded by Regency houses. Boat trips run from here, there is a boat café and even a Puppet Barge theatre.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

If you are looking for something different away from the usual tourist trails, a walk along Regent’s Canal offers a great deal of variety in a walk through the north of London.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review: Land of the Lions at ZSL London Zoo – July 2016

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Land of the Lions is ZSL London Zoo’s biggest and most ambitious new attraction which was unveiled to the public at Easter and quickly has become a firm favourite.

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The £5.7m attraction Land of the Lions transports visitors to the Lions wild home in the Gir Forest region, in the Indian state of Gujarat. Rickshaws, bicycles, sacks of spices, maps, rangers’ huts, and even a life-size truck – researched, sourced and shipped from India – are dotted around Land of the Lions, both inside and out of the lions’ domain, which will highlighting the uniquely close relationship in which Asiatic lions live with people in their native Indian habitat.

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Visitors to the attraction enter through a stone archway, before picking up their ‘park pass’ at the Gir Tourist Information centre. They’ll then explore Sasan Gir Train Station or embark on a journey on the overhead walkway, to discover the troop of lively Hanuman langur monkeys, and watch the lions in their forest home.

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Visitors have an almost ‘windowless-view’ of the big cat’s enclosure, as visitors enter the crumbling ruin of an amphitheatre-style Lion Temple.

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Part of the attraction feature interactive adventures that replicate what some of the issues that rangers in the wild have to deal with.  Wild Asiatic lions are found only in the Gir Forest region and are protected by law, however they are under threat due to disease outbreaks and conflict with human developments.

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The Land of the Lions is part of London Zoo’s drive to bring a more authentic understanding of an animal’s habitat and how the relationship between animal and humans is often quite complex. The recreation of the Lions wild home in the Gir Forest region and how local guides, rangers and people react to sharing their home with lions gives some insights into how people can often threaten nature but also provide sanctuary. This particular attraction is part of the London Zoo experience and is included in the main ticket, however for a very different experience,  Gir Lion Lodge in the Land of the Lions development allows some visitors to stay overnight  as part of a package deal.

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Land of the Lions will support and promote ZSL’s international conservation efforts to protect Asiatic lions.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the London Zoo website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to London Zoo

Penguin-Beach-Live-new-site

London Zoo was officially open in 1828 as the world’s first scientific zoo, when it was opened it was only intended for scientific study and was only open to fellows of the Zoological Society of London. It was not opened to the public until 1847.

Located near to Regent’s Park, the grounds of London Zoo were designed by Decimus Burton and included a number of features including the Clock Tower, the Giraffe House and the East Tunnel that links the north and south parts of the zoo together. Later other architectural features were built including the mountain landscape of the Mappin Terraces in 1914, the Round House in 1933, The Penguin Pool in 1934 and the Snowdon Aviary in 1964.

Snowdon-2015

As well as the scientific interest the first 150 years of the Zoo was more about education and entertainment, many animals had never been seen live in the United Kingdom. A hippopotamus caused great interest when it arrived in 1850 as did Jumbo, the largest Elephant in captivity at the time. Guy the gorilla arrived at the Zoo in 1947 and was a great favourite up till his death in 1978. More recently, Chi Chi the giant panda’s arrival in 1958 made her into a star attraction.

The large number of animals kept at the Zoo especially the large animals in small spaces began to be a source of concern as the general public’s attitude to Zoos began to change. In the 1980s and 90s, dwindling number of visitors led to financial problems and the threat of closure. The decision was made by the Zoological Society of London which runs the Zoo to concentrate more on conservation and breeding programmes and to have fewer animals and begin to build environments that was more suitable for the animals that lived in them.

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Land of the Lions is the latest new enclosure for London Zoo’s Asiatic lions, which opened in Spring 2016. The enclosure is designed to resemble the Gir Forest National Park in India. Other enclosures include Tiger Territory , Gorilla Kingdom, Into Africa, Rainforest Life and The Outback located on the Mappin Terraces.

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Other highlights of the Zoo include the Aquarium, Animal Adventure for children, the Reptile House , B.U.G.S, Penguin Beach , In with the Lemurs, Meet the Monkeys and Butterfly Paradise.

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The Zoo runs a series of events throughout the year including opportunities to stay in London Zoo overnight.

Ticket Prices

Adults – £24.25

Children (3-15 years) – £17.60

Children under 3 years – Free

For more information and tickets, visit the London Zoo website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to The Regent’s Park

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The Regent’s Park (including Primrose Hill) covers 197 hectares and like most of the other Royal Parks, Regent’s Park was part of the large area of land appropriated by Henry VIII. Marylebone Park, as the area was known, remained a royal domain until 1646. After the Civil War, the land was leased by the crown to tenant farmers until 1811 when the rapidly developing London made the area attractive to building.

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John Nash, architect to the crown and friend of the Prince Regent developed a masterplan for Regent’s Park which included a huge circle with a lake, a canal and the new royal residence inside. There was also a plan for 56 villas in the park and a series of grand Regency terraces around it.

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Although the masterplan was never completed, many elements of Nash’s scheme survived with eight villa’s and a series of grand Regency terraces built. The park was only used originally by the residents of the villas and terraces until 1835, when the east side the park was open to the public.

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The park was little changed for 150 years until formal Rose beds were developed in Queen Mary’s Gardens in 1930s.

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Running through the northern end of the park is the Regent’s Canal and it borders on London Zoo, but much of the park is open parkland with a wide range of facilities including gardens, a lake with a boating area, sports pitches, and children’s playgrounds.

See Video Review here

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Rare Sumatran Tigers at London Zoo

Melati-checks-on-cubs-outside-(c)ZSL-(1)

Photo (c)ZSL

The extremely rare three Sumatran tiger cubs at London Zoo underwent a medical to determine their sex and well being at ZSL London Zoo.

Tiger keepers Paul Kybett and Teague Stubbington had to first separate mum Melati from the cubs her brood before the vets could begin their medical, and were then in charge of rounding up the cubs – which has the pictures show was not an easy task , as the tiger triplets already have sharp claws and feisty personalities.

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Photo (c)ZSL

It was discovered that Melati the mother had given birth to two males and one female, each tiger cub is priceless in the battle to protect this critically-endangered species.

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Photo (c)ZSL

Chief vet Nic Masters closely examined each cub before declaring them all fit and healthy.

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Photo (c)ZSL

Vet nurse Jo Korn then had the  task of micro-chipping each cub, recording their sexes and vital statistics on to the chip, which in turn will be added to the studbook records for the worldwide breeding programme

Zookeeper Paul Kybett said: “Our three Sumatran tiger cubs are doing incredibly well and their first health check is a major milestone for them; I’m delighted to say that they all look fantastic.

The ZSL London Zoo’s keepers will be running a competition with Channel 5’s Milkshake programme, with the winner helping to choose names for the three cubs.

Three of world’s rarest tigers born at ZSL London Zoo

Melati and Cubs at ZSL London Zoo (c)ZSL

Melati and Tiger Cubs  (c)ZSL

Three critically endangered Sumatran tigers born at ZSL London Zoo

Three of the world’s rarest tigers have been born at ZSL London Zoo, the as-yet unsexed triplets were born to five-year-old Sumatran tigress Melati, on Monday 3 February 2014, after a 106-day pregnancy.

Born in the early hours of the morning and arriving within an hour of each other, the first cub arrived at 12:28am, the second at 12:59am, and the last was delivered at 1:18am, with keepers monitoring the whole birth using remote camera technology.

Melati cleaning her cubs (c)ZSL

Melati and Tiger Cubs  (c)ZSL

The hidden camera has provided some remarkable pictures of the Mother and three cubs within the special cubbing dens.

Melati and Tiger Cub Hug (c)ZSL

Melati and Tiger Cubs  (c)ZSL

One of the  Zookeepers Teague Stubbington said: “We couldn’t be more delighted with our new arrivals, and with how Melati is responding to her three cubs.

Melati relaxing with tiger cubs (c)ZSL (1)

Melati and Tiger Cubs  (c)ZSL

The birth of the three cubs represents a major achievement for ZSL London Zoo as the Wild Sumatran Tiger population is estimated to be as low as 300 . It is also a major boost for global breeding programme of this critically endangered species. Hopefully these births and others will arrest the decline in the wild, otherwise  Sumatran tigers will face the very real threat of extinction within the next decade..

Cubs suckling with mum Melati (c)ZSL

Melati and Tiger Cubs  (c)ZSL

Visitors to ZSL London Zoo can still see six-year-old dad Jae Jae hanging out in Tiger Territory and zookeepers will be revealing exclusive footage of the cubs on ZSL’s YouTube channel throughout March.

For more information visit www.zsl.org