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The Trooping of the Colour 2016 on Horse Guards Parade – 11th June 2016

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The Trooping of the Colour is a colourful and spectacular celebration of the Sovereign’s official birthday. Its origins lie in a military tradition of showing the ‘Colours’ to your regiment, the reason was to make your troops familiar with your regiments flags and insignia. The principal role of a regiment’s Colours was to provide a rallying point on the battlefield. Displaying the ‘Colours’ at various ceremonies was called ‘trooping’, therefore the tradition of Trooping of the Colour began with a practical and important purpose.

The Guards are amongst the oldest regiments of the British Army and have served as the personal bodyguards of the Sovereign since the monarchy was restored after the English Civil War in 1660. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have been performed first during the reign of King Charles II . In 1748, it was decided that this parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign and it became an annual event after George III became King in 1760.

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The ceremony of Trooping the Colour has developed into an impressive display of pageantry that takes place on a Saturday in June by her personal troops, the Household Division, on Horse Guards Parade, with Her Majesty the Queen herself attending and taking the salute. Over 1400 officers and men will be on parade, together with two hundred horses; over four hundred musicians from ten bands and corps of drums march. The parade route extends from Buckingham Palace along The Mall to Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall and back again.

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During the ceremony, The Queen is greeted by a Royal salute and carries out an inspection of the troops. After the massed bands have performed a musical ‘troop’, the escorted Regimental Colour is carried down the ranks. The Foot Guards and the Household Cavalry then march past Her Majesty, and The King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, rank past. The Queen rides in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of her Guards, before taking the salute at the Palace. The troops then return to barracks. Her Majesty then joins other members of the Royal Family on the palace balcony for a fly-past by the Royal Air Force.

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There are two rehearsals that provide some entertainment for visitors, The first rehearsal known as The Major General’s Review usually takes place two weeks before the actual Birthday Parade. The second rehearsal known as The Colonel’s Review usually takes place a week before the actual Birthday Parade.

 The actual ceremony itself attracts large crowds which stand on the Mall or St James Park overlooking Horse Guards Parade, the Events begin at approximately 10.00am, with the fly-past at 1.00pm.

Tickets for seated stands around Horse Guards Parade are allocated by ballot. Up to a maximum of 3 tickets can be applied for Trooping the Colour.  Ticket prices are as follows for successful applicants: £30.00 each for Trooping the Colour; £10.00 each for The Colonel’s Review and tickets are free of charge for The Major General’s Review.  Applications should be made in January or February only.

If you are successful with tickets for the seated stands you are expected to dress in smart casual attire. No denim allowed. Hats are optional but recommended in the case of hot weather.

The Trooping of the Colour is especially popular with visitors to London with its colourful pageantry and Royal connections and large crowds begin to develop from around 9.00am.

For more information on The Trooping of the Colour, visit the website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Trooping of the Colour 2015 on Horse Guards Parade – Saturday 13 June 2015

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The Trooping of the Colour is a colourful and spectacular celebration of the Sovereign’s official birthday. Its origins lie in a military tradition of showing the ‘Colours’ to your regiment, the reason was to make your troops familiar with your regiments flags and insignia. The principal role of a regiment’s Colours was to provide a rallying point on the battlefield. Displaying the ‘Colours’ at various ceremonies was called ‘trooping’, therefore the tradition of Trooping of the Colour began with a practical and important purpose.

smallpath_300

The Guards are amongst the oldest regiments of the British Army and have served as the personal bodyguards of The Sovereign since the monarchy was restored after the English Civil War in 1660. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have been performed first during the reign of King Charles II . In 1748, it was decided that this parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign and it became an annual event after George III became King in 1760.

smallpath_299

The ceremony of Trooping the Colour has developed into an impressive display of pageantry that takes place on a Saturday in June by her personal troops, the Household Division, on Horse Guards Parade, with Her Majesty the Queen herself attending and taking the salute. Over 1400 officers and men will be on parade, together with two hundred horses; over four hundred musicians from ten bands and corps of drums march. The parade route extends from Buckingham Palace along The Mall to Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall and back again.

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During the ceremony, The Queen is greeted by a Royal salute and carries out an inspection of the troops.After the massed bands have performed a musical ‘troop’, the escorted Regimental Colour is carried down the ranks.The Foot Guards and the Household Cavalry then march past Her Majesty, and The King’s Troop, Royal Horse Artillery, rank past.The Queen rides in a carriage back to Buckingham Palace at the head of her Guards, before taking the salute at the Palace. The troops then return to barracks.Her Majesty then joins other members of the Royal Family on the palace balcony for a fly-past by the Royal Air Force.

smallpath_286

There are two rehearsals that provide some entertainment for visitors,The first rehearsal known as The Major General’s Review usually takes place two weeks before the actual Birthday Parade.The second rehearsal known as The Colonel’s Review usually takes place a week before the actual Birthday Parade.

The actual ceremony itself attracts large crowds which stand on the Mall or St James Park overlooking Horse Guards Parade, the Events begin at approximately 10.00am, with the fly-past at 1.00pm.

Tickets for seated stands around Horse Guards Parade are allocated by ballot. Up to a maximum of 3 tickets can be applied for Trooping the Colour.  Ticket prices are as follows for successful applicants: £30.00 each for Trooping the Colour; £10.00 each for The Colonel’s Review and tickets are free of charge for The Major General’s Review.  Applications should be made in January or February only. Please write in to:

Brigade Major
HQ Household Division
Horse Guards
Whitehall
London
SW1A 2AX

Please enclose a self-address stamped envelope in your application and do not send any money until requested to do so.

If you are successful with tickets for the seated stands you are expected to dress in smart casual attire. No denim allowed. Hats are optional but recommended in the case of hot weather.

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The Trooping of the Colour is especially popular with visitors to London with its colourful pageantry and Royal connections and large crowds begin to develop from around 9.00am.

The Trooping of the Colour 2015 : Sat 13 June

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Remarkable Story of the Temple Bar

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Standing near to St Paul’s Cathedral, mostly ignored by visitors is an arch that has a remarkable history. The arch is known as the Temple Bar and was commissioned by King Charles II, and designed by Sir Christopher Wren. Constructed from Portland Stone between 1669 and 1672 it occupied one of the most important locations in London, separating the  City of London and the City of Westminster.

This location was the point where Fleet Street becomes the Strand, a site now near the Royal Courts of Justice, it was at this spot that a Temple Bar stood from the 13th century. Originally just a wooden structure with a chain, it possessed considerable symbolic importance. Temple Bar was the  scene of a large number of historical pageants celebrating coronations and paying homage to dead Kings and Queens, through the Temple Bar passed Henry V, Anne Boleyn, Edward VI and  Mary Tudor. Before Queen Elizabeth the first’s  coronation, Gogmagog the Albion, and Corineus the Briton, the two Guildhall giants, stood next to the Bar.

In the late Middle Ages a wooden archway stood on the spot and although it escaped damage in the Great Fire of London , it was decided  by the City to rebuild the structure.

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The Wren designed Temple Bar is constructed in two stories with  one wide central arch for the road traffic, flanked on both sides by narrower arches for pedestrians.
During the 18th century, the heads of traitors were mounted on pikes and exhibited on the roof and  upper story room was leased to the neighbouring banking-house of Child and Co for records storage.

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Temple Bar, London, 1878 by A & J Bool

In 1878 the City of London Corporation decided that the arch was becoming a bottleneck for traffic and decided to dismantle the structure. It dismantled it piece-by-piece over an 11-day period and the Corporation stored the 2,700 stones. In 1880, at the instigation of his wife, Valerie Meux, the brewer Henry Meux bought the stones and re-erected the arch as a gateway at his house, Theobalds Park in Hertfordshire. Lady Meux used it to entertain friends but after she died, it became derelict and abandoned  until 2003.

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Temple bar at Theobolds Park (Photo M Newnham 1968)

In 1984, it was purchased by the Temple Bar Trust from the Meux Trust for £1. It was carefully dismantled and returned on 500 pallets to the City of London, where it was painstakingly re-erected as an entrance to the Paternoster Square redevelopment just north of St Paul’s Cathedral. It opened to the public on the 10 November 2004.

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London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here