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Exhibition Review: Among the Trees at the Hayward Gallery from 4 March to 17 May 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Hayward Gallery presents Among the Trees that celebrates works of art that are inspired by trees and forests. The exhibition spans the past 50 years and brings together works by 38 leading international artists from five different continents. Timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the exhibition explores how trees have shaped human civilisation and how they play an indispensable role in our lives and imaginations.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition includes a wide variety of media from immersive video installations, life-sized sculptures, large-scale paintings, drawings and black-and-white photographs. Participating artists are: Robert Adams, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Yto Barrada, Johanna Calle, Gillian Carnegie, Tacita Dean, Peter Doig, Jimmie Durham, Kirsten Everberg, Anya Gallaccio, Simryn Gill, Rodney Graham, Shi Guowei, Hugh Hayden, Eva Jospin, Kazuo Kadonaga, William Kentridge, Toba Khedoori, Luisa Lambri, Myoung Ho Lee, Zoe Leonard, Robert Longo, Sally Mann, Steve McQueen, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Mariele Neudecker, Virginia Overton, Roxy Paine, Giuseppe Penone, Abel Rodríguez, Ugo Rondinone, George Shaw, Robert Smithson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Thomas Struth, Rachel Sussman, Pascale Marthine Tayou and Jeff Wall.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition takes place in five galleries, each one having a variety of works. Gallery 1 features a series of photographs by Robert Adams which examines the impact of present-day human activity on nature. A tree sculpture by Anya Gallacio draws the attention as does a six-metre-high wooden sculpture by Giuseppe Penone.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Crowhurst II by Tacita Dean evokes a mysterious old tree.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 2 is dominated by Eva Jospin’s Foret Palatine and the ghostly drawings of Toba Khedoori.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 3 features a 16-metre-long video portrait of a Finnish spruce by Eija-Liisa Ahtila.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 4 introduces us to the wood itself with works by Giuseppe Penone and Ugo Rondinone’s sculpture of an ancient olive tree.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 5 has Jennifer Steinkamp’s 15-metre-long animated video projection which places us in the midst of a birch forest as it cycles through the four seasons.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This unusual exhibition provides viewers with a unique chance to go for a walk in the woods and forests of contemporary art, the enormous diversity of nature has long been a subject for artists and many of the works reflect the beauty and the complexity of the natural world around us. Some artists bring attention to the effects that human activity are having on nature and the importance of maintaining the delicate balance of the natural world.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan in Broadgate Arena

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Broadgate near Liverpool Street station is the location of a number of fascinating works of art, one of the most popular is Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan. Flanagan was born in 1941, in North Wales. In the 1950s, he studied architecture at Birmingham College of Art and Crafts and sculpture at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London from 1964 to 1966.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

He was best known for several permanent public sculptures, such as his giant bronze Hare on Bell in Man in New York, Thinker on a Rock in Washington, D.C and Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell at Broadgate. The sculpture in Broadgate is made of patinated bronze and was unveiled in 1988.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All these sculptures show the playfulness of Flanagan’s work, play was an important aspect of his work. He had his first solo show in London in 1960s followed by exhibitions in Amsterdam, in Berne and the Hayward Gallery.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In his later work, the hare became Flanagan’s emblem, he was fascinated by its fun and symbolic nature. Flanagan’s hares are well known public sculptures all around the world. Flanagan died in 2009 of motor neurone disease.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review: Bridget Riley at the Hayward Gallery from 23 October 2019 to 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Hayward Gallery presents a major retrospective exhibition devoted to the work of acclaimed British artist Bridget Riley, spanning 70 years of the artist’s working life. Bridget Riley at the Hayward Gallery is the largest and most comprehensive exhibition of her work to date and runs from 23 October 2019 to 26 January 2020.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bridget Riley achieved an international reputation for her pioneering works that explored the nature of abstraction and perception. In the 1960s, her iconic black-and-white paintings became associated with the emerging Op Art movement. Riley won the International Prize for Painting at the XXXIV Venice Biennale in 1968 and was the feature of a 1971 exhibition at the Hayward Gallery entitled Bridget Riley: Paintings and Drawings 1951-71. This exhibition includes over 200 works and 50 key paintings, it also features several large canvases that have seldom been seen in this country.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition starts in the Upper Galleries with ‘Beginnings’ which includes some of her early works before she moved into abstraction. Riley was influenced by the work of Bonnard, Matisse and Paul Klee and used drawing as a key component in finding out how to organise visual information.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

An illustration of how Riley decoded others work is the section called ‘Looking at Seurat’, Riley made a study of Seurat’s painting The Bridge at Courbevoie in 1959. Rather than just a reproduction, she followed Seurat’s method in relation to colour, light and contrast.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

By the beginning of the 1960s, Riley was ready to follow her own path with her Black and White series which includes Kiss, (1961), Movement in Squares, (1961) and Blaze 1, (1962). Riley seemed to have tapped into the spirit of the times and her work was acclaimed by critics and the public in the UK and internationally.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the mid 1960s, Riley began to move on with ‘Curves’ with Drift 2 (1966) and towards the full use of colour in Aubade, (1975), Clepsydre (1976) and Streak 2 (1979).

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Riley’s experimentation continued in the 1970s with ‘Stripes and Diagonals’, the use of colour became more complex and diagonal lines are used to break up the stripes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Since the 1980s, Riley has experimented and refined her approach with a series of works, the unique nature of the Hayward Gallery, with its large spaces allow the installation of several key wall works (Composition with Circles 4, 2004, Rajasthan, 2012, Quiver 3, 2014).

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the more unusual pieces of work is the only three-dimensional work that the artist ever realised, Continuum (1963/2005). The work allows the viewer to enter and enjoy an immersive experience.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The section called ‘Recent Developments’ explore Riley’s recent work using the disc has the primary form, the monumental wall painting Messengers has recently been installed at the National Gallery and here we have a small section of the same design and works from the Measure to Measure series.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating and entertaining exhibition provides a comprehensive study of one of Britain’s most original artists, Bridget Riley takes many of the ideas of perception and form and takes them to a different level. Many of her works are full of energy and action with a dynamic yet precise use of colour and form. Close inspection proves a challenge to the viewers who begins to question what they are actually seeing. This interaction is part of Riley’s mission to bring attention to the way that we percieve ourselves and the world around us.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review – Kader Attia: The Museum of Emotion at the Hayward Gallery from 13 February to 6 May 2019

The Hayward Gallery presents the first major survey in the United Kingdom of leading international artists: Kader Attia. The exhibition entitled The Museum of Emotion explores Attia’s work art from the past two decades. Attia grew up in Paris as the son of Algerian immigrants and in the first room Attia draws on the experience of often living between two very distinct cultural environments.

A recent video projection (La Tour Robespierre, 2018) investigate the ‘inhuman modernism’ of the Parisian banlieues where the artist grew up. Suggesting that the effects of colonialism are often replicated within the ‘mother country’.

Room two takes this idea a stage further by Attia with a focus on his work on people who are marginalised or live on the periphery of society – whether transsexuals, illegal immigrants, or the mentally or physically disabled. His photographic series, La Piste d’atterrissage (Landing Strip) (2000–2002) offers complex and intimate portraits of a community of transgender Algerian prostitutes in Paris, many of whom were illegal immigrants.

As a contrast The Field of Emotion (2018) juxtaposes images of male politicians and dictators including Hitler and Stalin with famous female singers known for their emotional or affective delivery like Aretha Franklin and Maria Callas. Underlying all these images is the idea that emotion can be mobilised for good or evil.

Room Four includes artworks, such as The Scream (2016) or Mirrors and Masks (2013), which suggests there is an under-acknowledged influence of African culture in Western art history and Measure and Control (2013) which looks at the way that the West uses classification as a way of making sense of the world.

Room Five is the most complex space and features Attia’s work that questions traditional museum presentation and how Western societies represent and engage with non-Western cultures.

The artist’s interest in the legacies of violent conflict is portrayed in his multi-channel video installation Shifting Borders (2018) which comprises of three separate videos as well as sculptures mostly dealing with conflicts in South Korea and Vietnam.

This complex and thought-provoking exhibition introduces the work of Kader Attia to a wider UK audience. His underlying theme to his work is the world today cannot be understood without taking into account the psychological and emotional aspects of society. With large-scale migration a reality across the globe, it is an important message that many move location but the psychological and emotional aspects of a person’s identity is often based in their homeland. Using the idea of repair, he seems to be suggesting that we should be building bridges rather than burning them.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review – diane arbus: in the beginning at the Hayward Gallery from 13 February to 6 May 2019


The Hayward Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled diane arbus: in the beginning, which includes nearly 100 photographs. The exhibition takes an in-depth look at the formative first half of Diane Arbus’ career, from 1956 to 1962, when the artist began to develop the style for which she later became celebrated.

Presented across the upper floor of the Hayward Gallery, this exhibition includes some fifty photographs which have never been shown in Europe, all vintage prints from the Diane Arbus Archive at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

In the exhibition, each photograph is presented on an individual free-standing wall and visitors are encouraged to navigate their own individual routes through the exhibition. Walking around these small mazes, visitors can give full attention to the portraits of a wide spectrum of post war American society. Arbus discovered the majority of her subjects in New York City and depicts a cross-section of urban life which including portraits of couples and children, local characters, carnival performers, strippers, and transvestites.

Diane Arbus first began taking pictures in the early 1940s when she was working with her husband, Allan Arbus in a fashion photography business. She studied photography with Berenice Abbott in the 1940s and Alexey Brodovitch in the mid-1950s. After attending Lisette Model’s photographic workshop in 1956, Arbus decided to pursue her own style of work.

In the early sixties, Arbus began to turn her back on her 35mm camera and started working with a square format (2 1/4-inch twin-lens reflex) camera. Her portraits using this new format began to be recognised as a distinctive feature of her work. The photographs range from the mundane, Boy stepping off the curb, N.Y.C. 1957–58 to the bizarre, Jack Dracula at a bar, New London, Conn. 1961 and often offer a grainy surreal quality.

Whilst some photographs have the instant quality of street photography, others tend to be more traditional portraits. Arbus’ style began to get noticed and she was awarded Guggenheim Fellowships in 1963 and 1966 for her project on ‘American Rites, Manners, and Customs.’ However her work was not widely known and was not financially rewarding.

To create more financial security, Arbus made a portfolio of original prints entitled ‘A box of ten photographs’, which was meant to be the first in a series of limited editions of her work. The exhibition concludes with a separate gallery presenting A box of ten photographs, the portfolio Arbus produced in 1970 and 1971 comprising some of her best known works in square format including Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1967 and A Jewish giant at home with his parents in the Bronx, N.Y. 1970.

Arbus committed suicide in 1971 and since her death as been an artist that has often divided opinion. While many have praised the way that Arbus engages with direct personal encounters with her subjects. Others have suggested her choice of subjects led to an exploitative type of ‘Freak’ show.

The Hayward Gallery was the first UK institution to exhibit Diane Arbus’ photographs in a major retrospective back in 1974 and now offers visitors the opportunity of considering the legacy of one of the influential American photographers of the mid 20th century.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery – 26th September 2018 to 6th January 2019


The Hayward Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled Space Shifters which features artworks by 20 leading international artists that challenges the visitor’s sense of space and perception. Many works in the exhibition interact directly with the Gallery’s distinctive architecture using  reflective or translucent materials like glass, resin and mirror.

The exhibition presents a range of historical and contemporary sculptures, as well as immersive, site-specific installations. It also premieres several major new commissions.  Participating artists include: Leonor Antunes, Larry Bell, Fred Eversley, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jeppe Hein, Roni Horn, Robert Irwin, Ann Veronica Janssens, Anish Kapoor, Yayoi Kusama, Alicja Kwade, John McCracken, Josiah McElheny, Helen Pashgian, Charlotte Posenenske, Fred Sandback, Monika Sosnowska, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané,DeWain Valentine, and Richard Wilson.

The earliest works in this group show are often associated with the ‘Light and Space’ movement which originated in the mid-1960s in the Los Angeles area. At this time, a number of the American artists included in the exhibition began experimenting with unconventional materials and innovative fabrication processes.  Helen Pashgian contributes several epoxy and acrylic spheres and a series of large acrylic columns which use varying degrees of transparency and light to generate optical effects.

Many of the works created by these artists allow viewers to both see into as well as through the material of a solid sculpture. Robert Irwin’s work Untitled (Acrylic Column), 1969–2011 is a large clear acrylic column that rises over 4.5 metres in the Hayward’s upper gallery.

Using an innovative spinning casting process, Fred Eversley creates vivid coloured lenses through which viewers can explore the world in many different hues.

Larry Bell is represented in the exhibition by his first large-scale installation Standing Walls (1969/2016). Viewers can enter to experience its different reflections and effects.

Contemporary artist Ann Veronica Janssens demonstrate the diversity of perceptual effects using glass by exploring colour in radically different ways. Janssens bonds reflective film between sheets of smashed glass for her Magic Mirrors.

In the first gallery,  Jeppe Hein’s 360° Illusion V, 2018, a huge rotating mirror sculpture constantly changes the reflections of the surrounding architecture and viewers.

Other reflective highlights of the exhibition include: Yayoi Kusama’s renowned Narcissus Garden (1966-), a landscape of hundreds of large stainless steel spheres.

Using the outside light, Sky Mirror, Blue (2016) by Anish Kapoor captures a piece of the sky and reflects it onto  one of the Hayward Gallery’s sculpture courts.

Alicja Kwade’s WeltenLinie (2017) is shown for the first time since its premiere at the last Venice Biennale. This installation encourages the viewer to walk around and through its structure of frames, as objects seem to change appearance.

Occupying an entire upper gallery, Richard Wilson recreates his monumental installation 20:50 (1987). Thousands of litres of recycled oil form a waist-high horizon that surrounds the viewer as they proceed down a gangway.

Leonor Antunes  has created a piece that cascades downward from one of the new Hayward Gallery ceiling full of  brass shapes.

And while wandering through the galleries, visitors encounter Josiah McElheny’s Interactions of the Abstract Body (2012) which keeps perceptions shifting – trained dancers wearing mirrored wooden costumes interact with visitors as well as other artworks in a continuously changing performance.

This enjoyable and entertaining exhibition uses the Hayward Gallery’s unique architectural features to the full with works that fill the spaces with a variety of reflective effects. Visitors can engage with the works to create a number of perceptual effects to create an ever-changing landscape. The exhibition illustrates the fascination and skill of artists to find different ways of looking at the world around us, sometimes the changes are subtle whilst others can be dramatic and disorientate the viewer. The exhibition is a fitting conclusion to events celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Hayward Gallery and provides evidence that the Hayward Gallery often offers a different experience to many of the other galleries in London

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery – 26th September 2018 to 6th January 2019

Hayward Gallery’s Autumn exhibition Space Shifters features artworks by 20 leading international artists that alter or disrupt the visitor’s sense of space and re-orient their perception of their surroundings in ways that are subtle yet dramatic. The works in the exhibition focus the attention of the viewer on the act of perception whilst transforming their experience of the Gallery’s distinctive architecture. Often constructed from reflective or translucent materials like glass, resin and mirror, the artworks in the show aim to elicit surprising responses that are both physiological and psychological. They also comprise an alternative history of minimalism: not a geometric, austere, serial minimalism, but one with a more alluring, elegant and playful sensibility.

Space Shifters presents a range of historical and contemporary sculptures, as well as immersive, site-specific installations. It also premieres several major new commissions.  Participating artists include: Leonor Antunes, Larry Bell, Fred Eversley, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jeppe Hein, Roni Horn, Robert Irwin, Ann Veronica Janssens, Anish Kapoor, Yayoi Kusama, Alicja Kwade, John McCracken, Josiah McElheny, Helen Pashgian, Charlotte Posenenske, Fred Sandback, Monika Sosnowska, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané,DeWain Valentine, and Richard Wilson.

The earliest works in this group show are often associated with the ‘Light and Space’ movement which originated in the mid-1960s in the Los Angeles area. At this time, a number of the American artists included in the exhibition were experimenting with unconventional materials and innovative fabrication processes. One of the few female artists associated with Light and Space, Helen Pashgian contributes several epoxy and acrylic spheres and a series of large acrylic columns which use varying degrees of transparency and light to generate optical effects.

Many of the works created by these artists allow viewers to both see into as well as through the material of a solid sculpture. Robert Irwin’s work Untitled (Acrylic Column), 1969–2011 is a monumental and majestic clear acrylic column that rises over 4.5 metres in the Hayward’s upper gallery, yet is almost imperceptible, save for its refractive properties. Using an innovative spinning casting process, Fred Eversley creates sensuous coloured lenses through which viewers can witness the world anew.

Larry Bell, who explores similar concerns through the medium of glass, is represented in the exhibition by his first large-scale installation Standing Walls (1969/2016). Viewers can enter to experience its compounding reflections and effects whilst seeing themselves within the sculpture. Contemporary artists Ann Veronica Janssens and Roni Horn demonstrate the diversity of perceptual effects using glass by exploring colour in radically different ways. Janssens bonds reflective film between sheets of smashed glass that give her Magic Mirrors a dynamic, iridescent shine, while Horn’s large cast-glass lozenge Untitled (“Everything was sleeping as if the universe were a mistake.”), 2012–13 seems to contain an uncanny depth and liquidity.

In Space Shifters, several artists ponder the notion of reflection and that its definition holds a double meaning: the physical mirroring of an object and the contemplative act. The most dramatic example of this is Jeppe Hein’s 360° Illusion V, 2018, a huge rotating mirror sculpture that presides over the first gallery. This work reflects the surrounding architecture as well as groups of viewers, drawing them in with simultaneous inversions. Other reflective highlights of the exhibition include: Yayoi Kusama’s renowned Narcissus Garden (1966-), a landscape of hundreds of stainless steel spheres. Engaging the external environment, Sky Mirror, Blue (2016) by Anish Kapoor dramatically shifts a portion of the sky onto one of the Hayward Gallery’s distinctive sculpture courts.

Alicja Kwade’s WeltenLinie (2017) is shown for the first time since its premiere at the last Venice Biennale. This installation encourages the viewer to walk around and through its structure of frames, as objects seem to change appearance – a greyish rock turns to rusted metal, while a wooden tree trunk becomes a gleaming silver impression of itself.

Occupying an entire upper gallery, Richard Wilson recreates his monumental installation 20:50 (1987). Thousands of litres of recycled oil form a waist-high horizon that surrounds the viewer as they proceed down a gangway spliced through the inky liquid. The artwork’s glossy surface will reflect the Hayward Gallery’s new pyramid roof lights and the open sky beyond.

Several new commissions in the exhibition play off of the unique brutalist architecture of the Hayward Gallery building, taking on some of its more transitional spaces like the staircases and corridors. Daniel Steegmann Mangrané is inspired by the shape of the poured concrete stairwells and he has created, especially for this exhibition, curtains that echo their curves. Creating an equally delicate piece that cascades downward from one of the new Hayward Gallery ceiling coffers, Leonor Antunes conjures a light-filled volume of brass shapes. And while wandering through the galleries, visitors will encounter Josiah McElheny’s Interactions of the Abstract Body (2012) which keeps perceptions shifting – trained dancers wearing mirrored wooden costumes interact with visitors as well as other artworks in a continuous performance.

With spatial perception at its centre, Space Shifters is a fitting conclusion to the Hayward Gallery’s 50th anniversary, highlighting and making the most of some of the renovated building’s architectural features.

For more information , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here