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Eat17 opens a new store in Hammersmith as part of its plans to expand in the capital

With all the doom and gloom about the death of the high street, it may be time for the high street to reinvent itself and multi-award winning fine food store and restaurant chain Eat17 may be a model that will attract a lot of interest.

Eat17 combines elements of a convenience store with a dining scene and has recently opened its new store in Hammersmith as part of its plans to expand in the capital.

The new store is situated on Smiths Square Market on Fulham Palace Road and it is the fifth addition to the Eat17 chain, which has stores already in Walthamstow, Hackney, Whitstable and Bishop’s Stortford.

The Hammersmith store offers a unique interactive shopping experience that reinvents the market hall – offering the finest food and drink, 100 refillable food lines, an indoor street food market and yoga classes in store.

Eat17’s own brand ranges such as Bacon Jam and fresh bakery items share aisles with everyday SPAR essentials and local concession ranges. There is also self-serve coffee, wine and beer growlers as well as signature coffee in the bar area and soft serve ice cream.

 The dining area consists of three street food booths serving up fresh dishes from local food concessions including The Pizza Project, Knowing Meat knowing You and Bun Kabab of Empress Market Pakistani Kitchen.

 The booths are surrounded by beautiful plants and feature lighting and there is a seating area opposite. There is also a 2,000-square foot mezzanine room where yoga classes will take place.

All Eat17 stores are different but fall under the general ethos of the brand which is to provide quality local and convenience food alongside a dining option for a unique consumer  experience. It provides this by stocking the best food staples from Spar alongside Eat17 own brand ranges, offerings from in-house butchers and bakers and products from local concessions who trade in store.

These stores tend to appeal to the modern consumer who are happy to be faced with an eclectic mix of products and services under one roof.  With its reputation for innovation, Eat17 may be a name to watch in London in the next few years.

For more information, visit the Eat17 website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

All you need to know about the Cancer Research UK Boat Races – 27th March 2016

boat race 2016

Last year, sporting history was made when the men in the University Boat Race were joined on the Tideway for the first time by University Women’s Boat Race. First raced in 1829 and 1927 respectively, The University Boat Races are amongst the oldest sporting events in the world.

One of the more unusual events on the British sporting calendar is the University Boat Race, the annual rowing race between Oxford University Boat Club and the Cambridge University Boat Club on the River Thames between  Putney to Mortlake.

boat race 3

To the  uninitiated , each boat is made up of eight rowers and a cox and they row the 4.2 mile course, somewhat confusingly each boat is known as the “blue boat” due to the crews colours, light blue for Cambridge and dark blue for Oxford. The first race was in 1829 and the event has been annually ever since 1856 except for the war years, at present the scores are Cambridge 81 wins, Oxford 79 wins and one dead heat in 1877.

Part of the mystique of the boat race is often not the race itself which is seldom that close and is often decided by on which side you start. It is when things go wrong that make the headlines. In 1912 both crews sank due to the poor weather, Cambridge sank in 1859 and 1978, Oxford sank in 1925 and 1951. In 1984 Cambridge sank before the race started when their boat hit a barge.
There have also been rumours of mutinies of crews, however the most recent disruption was when a protester swam in front of the boats in 2012. It is not only a contest of brute strength , it is a great advantage to have the fastest current so the ability to read the river is vital.

For much of the races history, spectators tended to have associations with the universities, however since the race was sponsored in 1976 there have been moves to widen the races appeal and it is promoted and broadcast on many media platforms. Crowds have grown in recent years and the most popular spots along the course tend to be well populated, unlike many sporting events this one is free and can be quite enjoyable if the weather is fine and you find a vantage point.

boat race 2

You can enjoy the festival atmosphere of The Boat Race by watching for free from one of the many vantage points along the course. You should be able to find a place to watch on either side of the river along the full length of the course, but particular areas to note are: Putney Embankment and Bishops Park (at the start); Hammersmith and Barnes (mid-course); Dukes Meadows and Chiswick Bridge (at the finish).

Boat Race in the Park events featuring large screens at Bishops Park, Fulham and Furnival Gardens, Hammersmith mean you will be able to watch the whole Race before and after the crews have passed. Refreshments will be available within the parks.

course 2016

The Championship Course, Putney to Mortlake
The Boat Race course, known as the Championship Course is 4 miles, 374 yards or 6.8 Km long. It stretches between Putney and Mortlake on the River Thames in South West London.

This course was first used for the Boat Race in 1845 and has been used for every race since, (apart from 1846, 1856 and 1863 when the race was held in the opposite direction between Mortlake and Putney). The Fulham/Chiswick side of the course is known as the Middlesex side. The Putney/Barnes side of the course is known as the Surrey side.

The Boat Races are rowed upstream, but are timed to start on the incoming flood tide.  The Boat Race is usually an hour before high tide, with the Women’s Boat Race a further hour before so that the crews are rowing with the fastest possible current.

The programme for Race day contains something for everyone – fun for all at the “Boat Race in the Parks” events, the traditional Oxbridge Watermen’s Challenge, and  all the action from The Boat Races itself.

27th Mar 2016

The 2016 Cancer Research UK Boat Races

15:10 – The Cancer Research UK Women’s Boat Race

15:25 – Osiris-Blondie Race

15:40 – Isis-Goldie Race

16:10 – The Cancer Research UK Boat Race

For more information, visit the Cancer Research UK Boat Races website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

London Gastropubs – The Dove at Hammersmith

The-Dove-16

The Dove – 19 Upper Mall, Hammersmith, London, W6 9TA

In its idyllic Thames river side setting, The Dove at Hammersmith has been a popular watering place for generations. A pub has stood on this site since the seventeenth century.  It was in the pub that  poet James Thomson composed the famous strains of ‘Rule Britannia’.  The pub was also allegedly a place of  rendezvous between Charles II and  his mistress Nell Gwynne.

The-Dove-10

Its recent history is no less interesting being  a favourite Thames pub for a large number of the finest actors, writers and politicians .

The attractive building has it own claims to fame,  The small space to the right of the bar, reached through an extra entrance went into the Guinness Book of World Records as the smallest bar room in the world.  Step inside it and you’ll see the brass plaque that marks the height the waters reached in the great flood of 1928.

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For all its history , The Dove owned by Fullers since 1796 has built a reputation for its food, catering for locals and visitors alike.

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The Dove and its team of chefs propose to  use only the freshest ingredients, with each dish cooked to order . All of the meat is British,  sourced from local country farmers, the eggs are free range and ice cream is made in Hampshire.

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Example of Starters Duck & pork ballotine, Cointreau cured salmon, Roasted squash & pumpkin soup, Goat’s cheese mousse,Roast quail.

Example of Mains Pan fried cod loin, Hampshire lamb rump, Corn fed chicken, Fuller’s London Pride battered haddock, Venison bourguignon, Chalcroft Farm beef burger,
Pork & pumpkin sausages, Caramelised onion & mushroom suet pudding

Example of Puddings White chocolate & raspberry roulade, Pear & fig crumble,Bengal Lancer & marmalade bread & butter pudding, Tiramisu,Selection of Jude’s ice creams & sorbets.

If you want to find out more about  The Dove , visit the website here

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

All you need to know about The University Boat Race – April 6th 2014

boatrace (2)

One of the more unusual events on the British sporting calendar is the University Boat Race, the annual rowing race between Oxford University Boat Club and the Cambridge University Boat Club on the River Thames between  Putney to Mortlake.

To the  uninitiated , each boat is made up of eight rowers and a cox and they row the 4.2 mile course, somewhat confusingly each boat is known as the “blue boat” due to the crews colours, light blue for Cambridge and Dark blue for Oxford.

The first race was in 1829 and the event has been annually ever since 1856 except for the war years, at present the scores are Cambridge 81 wins, Oxford 77 wins and one dead heat in 1877.

Part of the mystique of the boat race is often not the race itself which is seldom that close and is often decided by on which side you start. It is when things go wrong that make the headlines. In 1912 both crews sank due to the poor weather, Cambridge sank in 1859 and 1978, Oxford sank in 1925 and 1951. In 1984 Cambridge sank before the race started when their boat hit a barge.
There have also been rumours of mutinies of crews, however the most recent disruption was when a protester swam in front of the boats in 2012.
it is not only a contest of brute strength , it is a great advantage to have fastest current so ability to read the river is vital.

For much of the races history, spectators tended to have associations with the universities, however since the race was sponsored in 1976 there have been moves to widen the races appeal and it is promoted and broadcast on many media platforms.

Crowds have grown in recent years and the most popular spots along the course tend to be well populated, unlike many sporting events this one is free and can be quite enjoyable if the weather is fine and you find a vantage point.

766px-University_Boat_Race_Thames_map_svg

The Course

The BNY Mellon Boat Race begins at 5.55pm on 6th April

You can enjoy the festival atmosphere of The Boat Race by watching for free from one of the many vantage points along the course. You should be able to find a place to watch on either side of the river along the full length of the course, but particular areas to note are: Putney Embankment and Bishops Park (at the start); Hammersmith and Barnes (mid-course); Dukes Meadows and Chiswick Bridge (at the finish).

Boat Race in the Park events featuring large screens at Bishops Park, Fulham and Furnival Gardens, Hammersmith mean you will be able to watch the whole Race before and after the crews have passed. Refreshments will be available within the parks.

For more details, visit the boat  race website here