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Review: National Maritime Museum in Greenwich

The National Maritime Museum is located within the historic buildings that form part of the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site and is run by Royal Museums Greenwich which comprises of the Royal Observatory, Cutty Sark, National Maritime Museum and Queen’s House.

Greenwich has been the home to a naval-based art gallery since the early 1800s, however the idea for a National Maritime Museum goes back to the 1920s, when a public appeal was launched to develop a ‘national naval and nautical museum’. Sir James Caird purchased the A.G.H. Macpherson Collection of over 11,000 maritime prints, along with ship models and many other items, to help begin the Museum’s collection.

Over a decade later, the National Maritime Museum was opened by King George VI in 1937 and now holds some of the most important items in the world on the history of Britain at sea, including maritime art, cartography, manuscripts, official public records, ship models and plans. In the last ten years, more gallery spaces have been added and a new library and archive has been developed.

Highlights of the ground level area are the remarkable collection of figureheads from the late 17th century until the early 20th century, the stern gallery of HMS Implacable, a full size Type-23 frigate propeller and the lavish 20 metre The state barge built for Frederick, Prince of Wales and launched in 1732.

On the ground level is the Jutland 1916 gallery which was opened to mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland, the largest sea battle of the First World War.

Also on this level is J.M.W. Turner’s largest painting of The Battle of Trafalgar, 21 October 1805, which is one of the highlights of the museums art collection and the Voyagers gallery which tells the story of Britain and the sea and Maritime London.

Moving up to other levels, there are series of galleries and displays including the Nelson, Navy, Nation gallery which explores the life and times of great British hero Horatio Nelson and the history of the Royal Navy and British people from 1688–1815. One of the highlights is the actual uniform Admiral Nelson was wearing when he was fatally wounded at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Visitors can find out about Britain’s maritime trade with Asia in the Traders: the East India Company and Asia gallery and find a moments peace in the beautiful Baltic Exchange Memorial Glass gallery which commemorates World War I dead.

The museum has opened four new galleries from September 2018, Tudor and Stuart Seafarers uncovers stories of adventure and piracy, ambition and greed. Polar Worlds discover the challenges of extreme environments. From Arctic and Antarctic exploration to the impact of climate change on human lives. Pacific Encounters voyage to the world’s largest ocean and hear hidden histories of exploration and exploitation. Sea Things explores more personal connections with the sea with a series of personal stories.

The museum attracts many children and families with its AHOY! children’s gallery and you can enjoy food and drink in the Parkside Café and Terrace which features the popular Yinka Shonibare’s replica of Nelson’s HMS Victory in a bottle.

The National Maritime Museum is one of the top free museums in London and is often visited by those who wish to explore the many delights of historic Greenwich. The museum has in recent years worked to show their remarkable objects in a way that they illustrate particular stories and events. This very popular museum has been innovative in the way it uses historical objects and multimedia to tell the fascinating story of Britain’s maritime past.

For more information and tickets, visit the National Maritime Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Review : The Queen’s House in Greenwich

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Greenwich is a favourite destination for visitors who come to admire its many delights. One treasure that is often overlooked is the Queen’s House located near the National Maritime Museum.

The House’s has recently been closed to allow the Royal Museums Greenwich the opportunity to refurbish galleries and introduce new displays and colour schemes, bespoke lighting and new interpretation. It will be reopened on October 11th 2016 to celebrate its 400th anniversary featuring paintings that illustrate its Royal connections and work from the National Maritime Museum’s outstanding art collection.

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The Queen’s House has a remarkable history and is considered one of the most important buildings architecturally in the country.  The famous architect Inigo Jones was commissioned to design the building in 1616 by King James I’s wife, Anne of Denmark , although she never saw Inigo Jones’s Classical design completed because she died in 1619 when only the first floor had been built. In 1629, James’s son Charles I gave Greenwich to his wife Henrietta Maria and work on the Queen’s House resumed to be finally completed around 1636. The house is considered one of the first fully Classical building in England and marked a distinct   break from the traditional, red-brick Tudor style of building.

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The Civil War in 1640’s meant that Henrietta Maria had little time in the house before she went into exile and her husband was executed, although she did eventually return after the restoration in 1660. The house was then used by members of the royal family and for other purposes until 1805, when George III granted the Queen’s House to a charity for the orphans of seamen, called the Royal Naval Asylum. This remained until 1933, when the charity moved to Suffolk. It was taken over by the National Maritime Museum in 1934.

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As part of the new refurbishment Turner Prize winner Richard Wright has created a new artwork for the ceiling of the Great Hall which is inspired by the remarkable Tulip Stairs.

Visitors to the re-opened house will also be able to see Orazio Gentileschi’s Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife displayed in this iconic building for the first time since 1650. The painting, which is part of the Royal Collection, was one of a sequence commissioned for the Queen’s House by King Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria.

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The King’s Presence Chamber and Queen’s Presence Chamber have been used to house paintings illustrating the kings, queens, consorts and courtiers associated with the House and Greenwich during this period. This helps to bring the history of the Queen’s House to life and illustrates the connection with the Tudor Placentia Palace that once stood near the site.

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Walking around the remarkable house provides plenty of evidence of how Greenwich was at the centre of Royal life for centuries and how little remains to remind us of its Royal connections. Rather strangely, the entrance to the house is via the colonnade and not through the front and back of the building. From the house you can enjoy great views of Greenwich Park and the Naval College.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the Royal Museums Greenwich website here

Entrance is Free to Queen’s House

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Royal Greenwich Tall Ships Regatta – 5th to 9th Sept 2014

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The biggest fleet of tall ships to come to the capital in a quarter of a century will be visiting London for the Greenwich Tall Ship festival in September.
Over 50 tall ships attending the festival which will be moored at Greenwich, Royal Arsenal Woolwich, Wood Wharf (Canary Wharf), Enderby Wharf and Victoria Deep Water Dock. The will be a number of Cruises operating from Woolwich, and you can gain access on board some other ships for free.

Tall Ships And Glamour Camping Coming To Greenwich For Summer 2012

Greenwich is the destination port of the Falmouth – Royal Greenwich Tall Ships Regatta 2014. The ships leave Falmouth on 31 August and will arrive in Greenwich on the 4th of September.

The Royal Greenwich Tall Ships Regatta will be the highlight of the Festival. Over 20-30 Class A Tall Ships and more than 40 smaller Tall Ships from 4 to 9 September 2014. This event starts 4 September, when the Tall Ships arrive on the Thames after an exciting race from Falmouth. During the regatta the Royal Greenwich Tall Ships Festival will be from 5 to 9 September 2014.

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From 5 to 9 September, Royal Greenwich will host five days of activities. The Royal Greenwich Tall Ship Festival will provide a spectacular programme of music, dance and family entertainment.

For more information, visit the Royal Greenwich Festival website here

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Greenwich Music Time Festival – August 20th to 23rd August 2014

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Set within the grounds of the iconic Old Royal Naval College, the first Greenwich Music Time concert series in 2014 offers an eclectic mix of music over the August Bank holiday  weekend.

With all 5000 attendees seated it will a few nights  to remember next to the Thames ,  the event opens on Wednesday 20th August running until Saturday 23rd August 2014.

The final concert will feature local boy Jools Holland and his Rhythm and Blues Orchestra.

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The Australian Pink Floyd Show
Wednesday 20th August

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Goldfrapp
Thursday 21st August

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Proms on the Thames:
Russell Watson
with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
and special Guests Rhydian & Kerry Ellis
Friday 22nd August

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Jools Holland & his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra
and very special guests MELANIE C and MARC ALMOND
Saturday 23rd August

 For more information or Book Tickets , visit the GMT website here
London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Great London Street Food – Greenwich Market

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Brazilian Churros (Brazilian Churros are sweet crunchy doughnuts)

In the search for the best London Street Food , it is often within the Market areas that you find the greatest number of outlets. Greenwich Market is relatively small but is blessed with a large number  of Street Food stalls, here is just a selection.

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 Gourmet Hotdogs

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British Homemade Desserts

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Desi Indian Food -Homemade Indian Food in Punjabi style

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Mini Dutch Dippers -Little mini Dutch style pancakes

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Koyul Ltd -Handmade sushi specialist.

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Teriyaki-Ya – Japanese and Korean cuisine.

 

 

 

 

 

Review – Greenwich Market

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Greenwich historic market was originally assigned to the Commissioners of Greenwich Hospital in 1700. Originally housed next to West Gate of the Old Royal Naval College, it began to spread into the neighbouring area in the 1800’s. As part of a drive to clean up the market it was moved to its current position.

In 19th century the market traders generally sold live and dead meat, fish, eggs, butter, poultry, fruit and vegetables.

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In 1905 the market bye-laws were changed to enable trading six days a week with the exemption of Sundays, Christmas day and bank holidays.
After World War II the wholesale fruit, veg, meat and fish stalls of Greenwich Market went through a gradual period of decline until the 1980s.

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The 1980s saw a revival in the fortunes of Greenwich Market when it was decided to concentrate on arts and crafts. This decision was proven to be a sensible one with the market developing and expanding over recent years.

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Antiques and Collectables are the main attraction on (Tues, Thurs, Fri), Local Artists sell a range of contemporary and collectable prints, posters, sculpture, photography, maps and fine art especially at the weekend.

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Independent designers are well represented in the market especially in Art and Crafts.

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Around the outside of the market, Food outlets selling Street food from all around the world have increased recently and offer plenty of choice for refreshments.

To find out more, visit the Greenwich Market Website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

All you need to know about the London Marathon 2014

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The London Marathon is unique among international sporting events in that ordinary people  can compete with the best in the world, and that is what will happen this Sunday when over 35,000 people will be running the Marathon course of 26.2 miles.

The first London Marathon was held in 1981. 7,747 were accepted to race and there were 6,255 finishers, led home by the American Dick Beardsley and Norwegian Inge Simonsen, who staged a dead heat at the  finish on Constitution Hill. Joyce Smith  broke the British record to win the women’s race.

The event was a massive hit with the runners, the thousands of spectators who lined the course, and viewers who followed the race on the BBC. As a result, the 1982 race received more than 90,000 applications from hopeful runners around the world. The entry was limited to 18,059.

The race has grown in size, stature and popularity ever since. Now established among the major events in the sporting calendar, the London Marathon is shown on television in more that 150 countries around the world.

A total of 882,946 runners have completed the London Marathon (1981 to 2012), while a record 37,227 people finished in 2012.
it is estimated that more than £500 million has been raised for hundreds of charitable causes by London Marathon runners since 1981.

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If you are not competing you can join the hundreds of thousands of spectators lining the streets of London to cheer on the runners.
The course has three different starts on Blackheath that straddle the border between the Boroughs of Lewisham and Greenwich. These three routes eventually meet up at John Wilson Street in Woolwich by the Royal Artillery Barracks. The ‘race-line’ is marked out in blue on the road for the entire 26.2 miles.
After about six miles, the runners cross the Meridian Line that marks the transition from East to West and pass the Royal Naval College at Greenwich.
They turn right to the Cutty Sark before heading on to Surrey Quays and along Jamaica Road to Tower Bridge at around 12 miles.
Runners then cross the Thames, turning east along The Highway, over the halfway mark, into Wapping and on to the Isle of Dogs, through Canary Wharf, before returning back along The Highway and passing the Tower of London at 22.5 miles.
The course drops down to follow the Thames along Victoria Embankment and on to the Houses of Parliament where it turns towards St James’s Park. Finally, The Mall, with Buckingham Palace and Admiralty Arch at each end, marks the glorious finish.

However to get the best out of your day, here are some London Marathon day  tips:

AVOID THE START AREA

All the runners are entitled to free travel to the start, this means the trains will already be very busy. Even though extra trains are put on they can only have so many carriages so have great difficulty coping with large numbers of traffic.

If you are following a runner you would be better advised to use the time in the morning to find a good spot to watch the race.

PLACES TO  AVOID

If you have watched the Marathon on the television, you might be tempted to watch from one of the iconic sights like the Cutty Sark, Tower Bridge and the Mall. Not surprisingly these get crowded very early and become very difficult to move about – Remember you might be in the same spot for hours, so easy access to toilets and food  are important.
These busy areas include: •  Greenwich town centre and the Cutty Sark. •  Tower Bridge and the Tower Hill area. •  Anywhere from mile 23 to the Finish in The Mall, especially around Westminster and Parliament Square.

BE COMFORTABLE

April in London means that you could be hit by all four seasons in one day, so be prepared for rain, cold and sun.

It is not only the runners that will need food and drink so come prepared or stand near a food outlet.

You are likely to be on your feet all day so wear sensible and comfortable shoes.

TRANSPORT

Many roads are closed on race day, so the best way to get around is using the London Underground, Southeastern and Docklands Light Railway (DLR), who lay on extra services especially. Remember, the trains will be busy all day – expect it to be like rush hour. You’ll probably have to queue at some stations and the tube lines may be forced to shut temporarily throughout the day to help ease the crowds.

For more information and expected timings, visit the Marathon website here