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Exhibition Review – Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography at the National Portrait Gallery from 1st March to 20th May 2018

The National Portrait Gallery presents an exhibition entitled Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography which combines for the first time ever portraits by Lewis Carroll (1832–98), Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–79), Oscar Rejlander (1813–75) and Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822-65).

The exhibition examines the relationship between the four artists and brings together images drawn from public and private collections internationally. A number of the images have not been seen in Britain since they were made.

Two ways of Life by Oscar Rejlander, 1856-7

The exhibition explores in detail, the remarkable work of Swedish born Oscar Rejlander and features the finest surviving print of his famous picture Two Ways of Life of 1856-7, where he used a pioneering technique combining over 30 different negatives to create a single final image. An album of photographs by Rejlander purchased by the National Portrait Gallery is also on display.

Rejlander inspired many photographers with his ground breaking work  and Carroll, Cameron and Hawarden all studied under Rejlander briefly, and the four continued to exchange ideas about the new art of photography.

The photographers also shared sitters and within the exhibition, visitors can compare how Cameron and Rejlander both photographed the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson and the scientist Charles Darwin and how Carroll and Cameron both photographed the actress, Ellen Terry.

Lewis Carroll’s initial fame was through his writing especially Alice in Wonderland, his photography is probably lesser known, however the exhibition provides a connection between the two by featuring a series of Carroll’s photographs of Alice Liddell, his model for Alice, both as a child and a fully grown woman.

The work of Julia Margaret Cameron and Lady Clementina Hawarden is particularly interesting because they were women in a male dominated environment. Their portraits of other women are known for their often complex interpretations. Sadness featuring actress Ellen Terry by Cameron is an example of great technique and sensitivity. Hawarden’s images of the Maude family provide unusual poses with the women often looking away or into a mirror.

One of the consequences of the new art of photography was famous Victorians were photographed for the first time, the exhibition include portraits of sitters such as Charles Darwin, Alice Liddell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Thomas Carlyle, George Frederick Watts, Ellen Terry and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

This fascinating exhibition challenges the long accepted view that Victorian photography was formal and formulaic. Oscar Rejlander in particular, quickly pushed back the boundaries of the new art of photography. His influence on the other three artists to experiment was considerable and many of the images are remarkable even by today’s standards. All four photographers were pioneers in their own way and influenced latter generations of photographers in a variety of ways.

Video Review available here 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

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Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography at The National Portrait Gallery – 1st March to 20th May 2018

Two ways of Life by Oscar Rejlander, 1856-7

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography (1 March – 20 May 2018), will combine for the first time ever portraits by Lewis Carroll (1832–98), Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–79), Oscar Rejlander (1813–75) and Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822-65).

The exhibition will be the first to examine the relationship between the four ground-breaking artists. Drawn from public and private collections internationally, it will feature some of the most breath-taking images in photographic history, including many which have not been seen in Britain since they were made.

Alice Liddell by Lewis Carroll, 1858

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography will be the first exhibition in London to feature the work of Swedish born ‘Father of Photoshop’ Oscar Rejlander since the artist’s death. it will include the finest surviving print of his famous picture Two Ways of Life of 1856-7, which used his pioneering technique combining several different negatives to create a single final image. Constructed from over 30 separate negatives, Two Ways of Life was so large it had to be printed on two sheets of paper joined together.

Seldom-seen original negatives by Lewis Carroll and Rejlander will both be shown, allowing visitors to see ‘behind the scenes’ as they made their pictures.

Mountain Nymph, Sweet Liberty by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1866

An album of photographs by Rejlander purchased by the National Portrait Gallery following an export bar in 2015 will also go on display together with other treasures from the Gallery’s world-famous holdings of Rejlander, Cameron and Carroll, which for conservation reasons are rarely on view. The exhibition will also include works by cult hero Clementina Hawarden, a closely associated photographer. This will be the first major showing of her work since the exhibition Lady Hawarden at the V&A in London and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles in 1990.

Lewis Carroll’s photographs of Alice Liddell, his muse for Alice in Wonderland, are among the most beloved photographs of the National Portrait Gallery’s Collection. Less well known are the photographs made of Alice years later, showing her a fully grown woman. The exhibition will bring together these works for the first time, as well as Alice Liddell as Beggar Maid on loan from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Photographic study by Clementina Hawarden.

Visitors will be able to see how each photographer approached the same subject, as when Cameron and Rejlander both photographed the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson and the scientist Charles Darwin, or when Carroll and Cameron both photographed the actress, Ellen Terry. The exhibition will also include the legendary studies of human emotion Rejlander made for Darwin, on loan from the Darwin Archive at Cambridge University.

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography celebrates four key nineteenth-century figures, exploring their experimental approach to picture-making. Their radical attitudes towards photography have informed artistic practice ever since.

The four created an unlikely alliance. Rejlander was a Swedish émigré with a mysterious past; Cameron was a middle-aged expatriate from colonial Ceylon (now Sri Lanka); Carroll was an Oxford academic and writer of fantasy literature; and Hawarden was landed genty, the child of a Scottish naval hero and a Spanish beauty, 26 years younger. Yet, Carroll, Cameron and Hawarden all studied under Rejlander briefly, and maintained lasting associations, exchanging ideas about portraiture and narrative. Influenced by historical painting and frequently associated with the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, they formed a bridge between the art of the past and the art of the future, standing as true giants in Victorian photography.

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography will include portraits of sitters such as Charles Darwin, Alice Liddell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Thomas Carlyle, George Frederick Watts, Ellen Terry and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

If you would like to find out more about the exhibition, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Painting with Light: Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the Modern Age at Tate Britain from 11th May to 25th September 2016

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Tate Britain presents an exhibition which explores the relationship between British painters and photographers, the exhibition entitled Painting with Light covers a 70 year period in which painters and photographers began to question notions of beauty and art itself.

The exhibition brings together nearly 200 works to reveal the mutual influence of photography and painting includes works by John Everett Millais, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, JAM Whistler and John Singer Sargent. Many pioneers of early photographers are featured including David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson, Roger Fenton, William Henry Fox Talbot and Julia Margaret Cameron.

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The first room explores the influence of JMW Turner on early photography, Turner’s Edinburgh from Carlton Hill is shown with a series of photographs by David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson on the same subject matter. The work of photographer Robert Adamson with painter David Octavius Hill provides an early example of the two media working together for mutual benefits. David Octavius Hill’s iconic Disruption Portrait 1843-66 – a 12ft long painting featuring 457 portraits is exhibited outside of Scotland for the first time in over a century.

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The exhibition illustrates the way photography and painting began to influence each other in a wide range of subject matter,   John Everett Millais’s The Woodman’s Daughter and John Brett’s Glacier Rosenlaui inspired a number of photographers to explore nature and panoramic views.

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It was not just in Britain that the mutual influence of painting and photography was expressed, both artists and photographers travelled around Europe and the Holy Land to create work that was very popular in Victorian Britain. James Graham’s Nazareth from the North and William Holman Hunt’s Nazareth provide evidence of the close collaboration that often occurred.

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Gradually, photographers began to realise the commercial benefit of reproducing paintings, some of the highlights of the show is examples of three-dimensional photography, which incorporated the use of models and props to create a tableaux from popular works of the time, Henry Wallis’s Chatterton was a popular work to be used in this way and these stereographs became widely available to the general public, often being used as a form of after-dinner entertainment for middle class Victorian families.

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The relationship between photography and painting was sometimes based on the personal relationship of the photographer and the artist. Julia Margaret Cameron’s artistic friendships with George Frederic Watts and Dante Gabriel Rossetti are explored in a room devoted to their enigmatic portraits of each other and shared models, where works include Cameron’s Call, I Follow, I Follow, Let Me Die and Rossetti’s Beata Beatrix.

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Other areas covered include Life and Landscape, Atmosphere and Effect that compares Whistler’s and Langdon Coburn’s smoky Thames nocturnes . The room entitled Into Light and Colour illustrates it was not all doom and gloom, John Singer Sargent’s iconic Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose and Whistler’s Three Figure: Pink and Grey inspired photographers to look for beauty in gardens and flowers.

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In the final room, Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s iconic Proserpine hangs near to Zaida Ben-Yusif’s The Odor of Pomegranates to offer evidence of how in this period the definitions of beauty were being challenged and overthrown.

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This intriguing exhibition explores the little known relationship between painters and photographers and how it developed over a 70 year period. Like any new technology, photography looked to other media for inspiration and began to see the artistic and commercial merits of reproducing works of art and following popular trends. Artists began to see photography as a useful tool and often used photographs for inspiration. Gradually photographers began to be seen as artists in their own field and a number of collaborations with painters allowed for mutual benefit. This exhibition features a number of iconic paintings and photographs which provides plenty of interest for visitors and give valuable insights into one of the most exciting periods of British Art history.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the modern age

11 May – 25 September 2016

Adult £18.00 (without donation £16.30)

Concession £16.00 (without donation £14.50)

Under 12s go free (up to four per parent or guardian). Family tickets available

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Botticelli Reimagined at the Victoria and Albert Museum – 5th March to 3rd July 2016

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The Victoria and Albert Museum present a major new exhibition which explores the variety of ways artists and designers from the Pre-Raphaelites to the present have responded to the artistic legacy of Sandro Botticelli (1445-1510), assembling 150 works from around the world. Although, Botticelli is now recognised as one of the greatest artists, the exhibition reminds us that he was largely forgotten for more than 300 years until his work was ‘rediscovered’ in the 19th century.

Botticelli Reimagined is the largest Botticelli exhibition in Britain since 1930 and  includes painting, fashion, film, drawing, photography, tapestry, sculpture and print. There are over 50 original works by Botticelli, alongside works by artists such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, René Magritte, Elsa Schiaparelli, Andy Warhol and Cindy Sherman.

The exhibition begins with a screen showing excerpts from Dr No showing Ursula Andress emerging from the sea clasping a conch shell and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen in which Uma Thurman re-enacts The Birth of Venus.

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The first main section entitled Global, Modern, Contemporary illustrates how artists have taken aspects of  Botticelli’s imagery and incorporated them into their own works. Botticelli’s most famous work , The Birth of Venus which depicts the naked Venus emerging from a shell on the seashore is referenced by Andy Warhol’s Details of Renaissance , Yin Xin’s Venus After Botticelli , David LaChapelle’s Rebirth of Venus and a dress and trouser suit of patchwork panels from The Birth of Venus from Dolce & Gabbana’s 1993 collection. Botticelli’s influence is more widely considered by Bill Viola’s Going forth by Day and  5th surgery performance – Operation opera by ORLAN, This section also includes work by Tamara de Lempicka, Robert Rauschenberg, René Magritte and Maurice Denis.

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Rediscovery considers the impact of Botticelli’s art on the Pre-Raphaelite circle during the mid-19th century. Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Ruskin and Edward Burne-Jones all owned and were greatly influenced by Botticelli’s work. In this section a series of portraits by Burne – Jones and Rossetti, mostly featuring Jane Morris gives some insight into the way that the Pre-Raphaelites looked to the past for inspiration.

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Botticelli’s celebrated work, Primavera influences William Morris’ The Orchard and Evelyn De Morgan’s Flora. In this room are a couple of copies of The Birth of Venus by Edgar Degas and Gustave Moreau as well as Etienne Azambre’s Two Women copying Botticelli’s fresco of Venus and the Graces.

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Moving back in time, the final section of the exhibition arrives at Botticelli in his Own Time. A series of works by Botticelli show that he  was not only a wonderfully skilled artist but also ran a highly successful workshop which produced a large number of important works. Exhibits include his only signed and dated painting The Mystic Nativity , three portraits supposedly of the legendary beauty Simonetta Vespucci, and the remarkable Pallas and the Centaur, travelling to London for the first time.

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A small number of portraits of the elite of Renaissance Florence gives some context to the artist’s life and times before the show closes with two full-length paintings of Venus, reprising the heroine of The Birth of Venus, and the V&A’s Portrait of a Lady known as Smeralda Bandinelli which formerly owned by Rossetti.

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It is remarkable how some artists can produce work that remains influential over the centuries, This exhibition provides plenty of evidence that Botticelli is one of these artists. Whether it is through his influence on the Pre-Raphaelites or the way the iconic works such as the Birth of Venus has been endlessly reinterpreted in the late 20th especially. Although there is a running theme through the exhibition, in many ways it feels like three mini exhibitions in one. Due to the variety on display, the exhibition will have quite a wide appeal, each section has its own attractions and delights in an ambitious and interesting show.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Botticelli Reimagined

5 March – 3 July 2016.

Admission £15 (concessions available).

V&A Members go free.

Advance booking is advised

For more information or to book tickets, visit the V&A website here

 London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Book Review : The Street of Wonderful Possibilities by Devon Cox ( Frances Lincoln )

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Devon Cox’s book, The Street of Wonderful Possibilities focuses on Tite Street in Chelsea which became one of the most influential artistic quarters in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Famous residents including James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Oscar Wilde and John Singer Sargent helped to forge the street’s reputation for a sanctuary for those who followed a bohemian lifestyle.

Even before Tite Street had been created, Chelsea had developed a reputation as a haven for writers and artists. In the 1830s, Thomas Carlyle became the ‘Sage of Chelsea’ and in the 1840s, the mysterious ‘Mr Booth’ who lived in a small Chelsea cottage was none other than J.M.W Turner. The 1860s saw Dante Gabriel Rossetti after the death of his wife relocate to Cheyne Walk on the Chelsea riverfront with poet Algernon Swinburne. It was also at this time American artist James Abbott McNeill Whistler began his long association with the area. Both Rossetti and Whistler developed their own social gatherings and led to the idea that the area was becoming more bohemian. However, by the 1870s, the bohemian clique was beginning to relocate and even Whistler left Chelsea.

It was not only residents that were changing, Chelsea had been a small village in the first part of the 19th century but by the 1860s and 1870s it had become a part of the expanding metropolis. It was part of this development that led to the creation of Tite Street. The whole Chelsea riverfront was developed with a new embankment and Tite Street was developed to create a link between the Royal Hospital Road and the new embankment.

Whistler was looking for custom-built house with a studio and employed his friend and architect E. W. Godwin to create his dream house in Tite Street. For Godwin it was to be a more difficult task than he considered with Whistler often battling with the Metropolitan  board of works over the finer details of the house. Eventually The White House was completed in 1878 and become the first of an artist colony in Tite street, others followed including the young aristocrat artist Archibald Stuart Wortley, Carlo ‘Ape’ Pellegrini, Frank Miles and a certain Oscar Wilde. Whistler fresh from his success against the Board of Works began an ill-advised case against the respected critic John Ruskin. This case bought Tite Street into the public domain and although Whistler won his case, it was a hollow victory, he was given only a farthing damages. The building of the White House  and the court costs had financially ruined Whistler and he was declared bankrupt in 1879. Although he had lost everything, it proved only a temporary setback for the American who returned to Tite Street after a time in Venice and rented a studio at number 33. To improve his financial position, Whistler resolved to paint ‘ all the fashionables ‘.
This was the beginning of the golden age of Tite Street, the Prince of Wales and Lillie Langtry were amongst the first to visit Whistler’s new studio and soon the street was full of the carriages of the wealthy. It was not just the sitters, Whistler became a hero to a younger generation of painters who flocked to his studio, Mortimer Menpes and Walter Sickert were just two of his ‘pupils’. It was not just Whistler whose star was rising , Oscar Wilde was making his reputation with his plays, books and wit.
The book documents this period in detail, it was a time when the two ‘Titans’ dominated an area that had become the most important artistic enclave in London, but for all the success, there were clouds on the horizon which would envelope Tite Street.
The rise of fall of Oscar Wilde is well documented, however the photograph in the book of Whistler’s coffin being carried through a sparsely populated street is an indication that at the end, the artist’s ability to make enemies had surpassed his ability to make friends.

By 1903, two of the greatest ‘Titans’ of Tite Street had died and a number of the supporting cast had bought the curtain down on their careers. It was left to the more stable and popular Sargent to carry the flag for the bohemian enclave.  Following his illustrious compatriot Whistler, he began to paint the ‘fashionables’ and acquired  considerable wealth. When he died in 1925, the golden age of the street was over, other artists took on the baton but none reached the dizzy heights of Whistler, Wilde and Sargent. Augustus John bought some elements of bohemia but when he left in 1950, the world and the street had changed beyond all recognition from its glory days.

Although on the surface, the story of a street would not set the pulse racing, but this was no ordinary street. The author has bought together many of the interactions between the residents that often get lost in single biographies. Oscar Wilde watching Ellen Terry coming away from a Sargent sitting, costumed as Lady Macbeth and writing Tite Street “must always be full of wonderful possibilities” is a fine example of how the residents interaction provided inspiration for their work.

This is a fascinating, entertaining, well researched book with a number of illustrations which highlight some of the incredible pieces of art and writing produced behind the brick facades of Tite Street. Although the three ‘Titans’ dominate the book, the author acknowledges the parts played by a large supporting cast that included other artists, writers, models, mistresses, lovers, sitters, residents, pupils and critics. He also gives a voice to some of the women of Tite Street who tried to challenge the male dominated society, such as painter Anna Lea Merritt and the Welsh sculptor Edith Elizabeth Downing, who supported the suffragettes cause.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information or buy a copy of the book, visit the Frances Lincoln website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Anarchy and Beauty – William Morris and His Legacy, 1860-1960 at the National Portrait Gallery, 16 Oct 2014 to 11 Jan 2015

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In the  late Victorian and Edwardian Britain,  a group of  radical artists, craftsmen, architects, town planners and social reformers  looked at ways to bring their worldview to the general public,  at the centre of this movement was William Morris who was a textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and political activist.  Morris played a major part in the British Arts and Crafts Movement,  leading to a revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production.

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This exhibition  considers the impact and legacy of Morris’s politics, thought and design. The exhibition features  portraits, furniture, books, banners, textiles and jewellery, many brought together in London for the first time.

Morris had become interested in medieval history whilst studying at Oxford, it was also at Oxford where Morris met Edward Burne-Jones, who became his lifelong friend and collaborator.

Both Morris and Burne- Jones rejected many of the values of Victorian industrial capitalism and were attracted by a growing interest in Romanticism and Medievalism .  Morris’s ideas about ‘art for the people’ movement  was widely influenced by the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and the philosophy of John Ruskin.

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Morris and Burne – Jones interest in the Pre- Raphaelites took a more personal interest when Morris and his wife Jane became friendly with Dante Gabriel Rossetti and his wife Lizzie Siddall.

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The pictures and drawings in the exhibition illustrate some of the works at the time when Jane becomes a muse for Morris and Rossetti. Morris had been encouraged to take up painting by Rossetti but did not consider that his work was at a high level therefore began to concentrate on Textile and other designs.

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Although in the present day, Morris is known primarily for his Art and Crafts designs, in the Victorian age he was better known for his novels and poetry.

Morris with his distaste for the modern industrialised capitalist system was at any early stage attracted to the early socialist and anarchy movements, he became known to a number of political activists and played a contributing role in financing and promoting some of these groups.

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One of his prized possessions shown in the exhibition was a beautifully bound volume of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital.

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His creation of a firm that produced some of his many designs on a large-scale and for a predominantly middle class market often seemed at odds with his socialist beliefs but he always believed that the firm was more about controlling the production of his work rather than purely profit.

The exhibition extends beyond Morris’s own death in 1896 to show how his  ideas were further developed into the twentieth century.

The work of Eric Gill seems to offer a clear connection to Morris’s legacy, however Gill’s  sexually charged work as illustrated by the bizarre erotic Garden roller ‘ Adam and Eve ‘ was considered far more scandalous.

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Less controversial was the Garden City movement , the ruralist revival of the 1920s and 1930s, and the 1950’s Festival of Britain which all paid homage to Morris’s ideas of high quality goods, mass produced to provide ‘art for the people’.

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William Morris was one of the rare breed who was able to find a practical way of  fulfilling his visions , this exhibition offers a brief taste of the incredibly wide range of areas in which he excelled. His story is often due the rather complex domestic relationship with his wife tied up with the Pre Raphaelites especially Rossetti. However it was his friendship with Burne – Jones that provided a stable background to his many endeavours.

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This  exhibition will appeal to the many fans of Morris and the Art and Crafts movement but equally to those who wish to consider how design has developed over the last 150 years. As the many modern designers confirm on the wall outside the exhibition, the ideas of Morris are still an inspiration and that is perhaps his true legacy.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more or buy a ticket , visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

Anarchy & Beauty: William Morris and His Legacy, 1860-1960 (16 October 2014 – 11 January 2015),

Ticket prices

Tickets with donation*
Full price £14.00
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) £13.00
Concessions £12.00, children 12–18 years, registered unemployed, students, disabled people (with free entry for one carer)
Family: one/two adults or concessions

 

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here