Home » Posts tagged 'Charles Dickens Museum'

Tag Archives: Charles Dickens Museum

Exhibition Review- Global Dickens: For Every Nation Upon Earth at the Charles Dickens Museum from 14th May to 3rd November 2019

A new exhibition at the Charles Dickens Museum explores the global appeal of the famous author and the impact of his considerable travels on his life and writing. In an age when a ‘viral’ picture can travel around the world in seconds, it is worth considering how difficult it was for a 19th century writer to have global appeal. Whilst it was possible for writers to achieve fame around the British Empire, to sell books in other parts of world was difficult due to a number of factors.

This exhibition provides evidence that although Dickens is considered a quintessentially British writer obsessed by London, the reality was his work influenced people all around the globe. Unlike many 19th century writers, Dickens travelled extensively across Britain, Europe and America and both wrote about these places but also gave talks and performances creating a new type of international celebrity.

These travels were not without their problems, his criticism of American society in Martin Chuzzlewit and in his travelogue American Notes caused a considerable backlash, remarkably he returned to America many years later and was more popular than ever.

The exhibition features a hand written letter from Dickens to his friend William Macready in 1868 describing his impressions of Niagara Falls.

Part of Dickens appeal was his stories often had universal themes which were used and adapted in many different cultures. The exhibition give some idea of the way that Dickens has been used for inspiration ranging from Manga comics to numerous films, Dickens remains the most adapted writer of all time for TV and film.

The exhibition features a Russian poster for a theatre production based on Dickens, A poster for a production of Edwin Drood starring Claude Rains, and a Dutch translation of Dombey and Son.

One of the highlights of the exhibition is a copy of David Copperfield that went to the Antarctic on the 1910 Scott expedition. Its grubbiness indicates that it was well used by those on the ill fated expedition.

This fascinating small exhibition offers an opportunity to consider Dickens as one of the earliest global celebrities, his fame is not restricted to the past with many Dickens festivals still being held all over the world. Dickens never limited himself but was fascinated by his travels and used his journalistic and creative powers to provide his readers with stories of the world outside of Britain. In a fast changing world, Dickens often provided a record of the effects of major political and social changes in a number of countries.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Visitors to the exhibition are free to explore the Charles Dickens Museum, The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

‘Lost’ Portrait of Charles Dickens goes on display at the Charles Dickens Museum – 2 to 7 April 2019

A recently discovered portrait of Charles Dickens by Margaret Gillies is to be displayed at the Charles Dickens Museum. The ‘lost portrait’ of Charles Dickens was discovered in an auction of household goods in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa in 2017. Last year, the painting arrived at the Philip Mould & Co Gallery in London and, following conservation and provenance research, was confirmed to be the portrait of Charles Dickens painted by Margaret Gillies over six sittings in 1843, when Dickens was 31 years old and writing A Christmas Carol.

Gillies’ portrait was exhibited at the 1844 Royal Academy Summer Exhibition and quickly became the defining image of Dickens. On seeing the portrait, the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning said it “has the dust and mud of humanity about him, notwithstanding those eagle eyes”. However, in 1886, Gillies noted that she had ‘lost sight of the portrait itself’. It remained lost until the South African auction and undisplayed until its unveiling at Mould & Co last year.

The Museum is campaigning to raise the funds to secure the future of the painting and bring it permanently to Doughty Street. It has already raised £65,000 of the £180,000 needed to purchase the portrait.

Address: Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Review – Food Glorious Food: Dinner with Dickens at the Charles Dickens Museum from 28 November 2018 to 22 April 2019

The Charles Dickens Museum provides evidence of Dickens’s enduring influence on the celebration of the festive season when every year, Dickens’s home is dressed for a Victorian Christmas.

Food is often an important ingredient in Dickens’s stories and a new exhibition entitled Food Glorious Food: Dinner with Dickens investigates Dickens’s relationship with food and explores the epic menus of dishes and drinks served by the Dickens family to their many guests. The exhibition also examines how Dickens’s childhood memories of hunger led to him being a generous host of many dinner parties for some of the most influential and interesting members of Victorian society.

In the London townhouse into which Dickens moved with his growing family in 1837, the exhibition uses many of the family rooms to illustrate the influence of food in many Dickens novels.

In the upstairs exhibition gallery is a series of letters which provide first hand accounts by Dickens’s dinner guests that illustrate the experience of enjoying dinner with Dickens. Fellow novelist, Elizabeth Gaskell writes a letter giving a detailed description of a dinner at Dickens’s home.

Upstairs in the nursery is a reminder that the hardship of Dickens’s own childhood and the poverty influenced his writing most notably in Oliver Twist.

The exhibition examines some of the excesses of Victorian dining and often strange recipe combinations. The full dining table showcases a number of culinary delights that were often featured in novels.

A visit to the kitchen downstairs provides some insight into some of the ‘food scandals’ of the Victorian age, food was adulterated to extend its reach which led to acorns passing as coffee, plum leaves for tea leaves and the wholesale watering-down of milk and beer. The often ‘toxic’ ingredients sold indicate that food safety was in its infancy and became one of Dickens causes to fight for reforms.

A visit to the Charles Dickens Museum in the festive season is always a pleasure and a reminder of the enduring influence of Dickens on modern Christmas celebrations. The fascinating Food Glorious Food: Dinner with Dickens exhibition gives a wider perspective on how food provided links to Dickens childhood and inspired some of the most memorable scenes in his novels.

Whilst at the museum, you can find out about the campaign to raise £180,000 in order to secure the portrait of Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) by Margaret Gillies for the nation, bringing it into the Museum’s permanent collection and placing it on public display. The portrait was thought to have been lost for more than 150 years until it was rediscovered in South Africa in late 2017. If you would like to donate, find a link here

Address: Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX
Exhibition dates: 28 November 2018 – 22 April 2019

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Visitors to the exhibition can also explore the Charles Dickens Museum, The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Food Glorious Food: Dinner with Dickens at the Charles Dickens Museum – 28 November 2018 to 22 April 2019


Food is often an important ingredient in Dickens’s stories and a new exhibition entitled Food Glorious Food: Dinner with Dickens investigates Dickens’s relationship with food and the epic menus of dishes and drinks served by the Dickens family to their many guests. It shows his dinner parties full of activity, wit, comedy and people and their peculiarities were essential food for his imagination.

The exhibition also examines the deep-lying reason for Dickens’s need to entertain and share food, his hidden childhood memories of hunger and his belief, made clear in his stories, that rich and poor alike had the right to enjoy food and drink and that children deserved the security of proper meals.

The Food Glorious Food exhibition will be displayed throughout the rooms in which Charles Dickens and his family lived, entertained countless friends and hosted dinner parties for some of the most influential and interesting members of Victorian society.

The exhibition will feature household culinary items used by Dickens and will draw on letters and first hand accounts by Dickens’s dinner guests to build a vivid picture of the experience of enjoying dinner with Dickens.

Among the exhibits is a previously-unseen letter from 1849, written by novelist Elizabeth Gaskell giving a detailed description of a dinner at Dickens’s home.

Other exhibits include:

A groaning Victorian dining table, set for dessert and featuring items used by Dickens and his family when hosting social gatherings at home 

Charles Dickens’s large wooden lemon squeezer used to prepare his favourite punch recipes

Hand-written dinner invitations from Dickens to his friends

Dickens’s hand-written 1865 inventory of the contents of his wine cellar at Gad’s Hill Place (among the items to be found in Dickens’s cellar in 1865 were ‘one 50 gallon cask ale’, ‘one 18 gallon cask gin’, ‘one 9 gallon cask brandy’ and ‘one 9 gallon cask rum’. The cellar also included dozens of bottles of champagne, Chablis, Sauterne, Metternich hock, claret, L’eau d’or and Kirsch)

An extremely rare early edition of a fascinating cookbook written by Catherine Dickens – wife of Charles – in the early 1850s, entitled What Shall We Have For Dinner? filled with meals and menus (‘bills of fare’) created by Catherine to put before gatherings of between two and twenty people, all aiming to answer the title of the book

A silver-plated samovar owned by Dickens and used at his home at Gad’s Hill Place

Dickens’s heavy silver fish-knife, engraved with a fish design and the monogram ‘CD’

A set of 6 silver punch ladles presented to Dickens to celebrate the completion of Pickwick Papers, each featuring a character from the novel

Dickens’s wooden bread board

The exhibition’s guest co-curator is Pen Vogler, author of Dinner with Dickens: Recipes inspired by the life and work of Charles Dickens, published by CICO books. The book celebrates Victorian food and recreates the dishes which Dickens wrote about and served.

Visitors to the exhibition can also explore the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street, Bloomsbury, the London Townhouse into which Charles Dickens moved with his family in 1837. The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review – Charles Dickens: Man of Science at the Charles Dickens Museum from 24th May to 11th November 2018

The Charles Dickens Museum presents a new exhibition entitled Charles Dickens: Man of Science that challenges the long held belief that Dickens had little interest in science.

The misconception about Dickens and science can be traced back to writer George Henry Lewes who when he saw Dickens’s library at Doughty Street in 1839, he declared him ‘completely outside philosophy, science, and the higher literature’.

However by drawing on his novels, journalism, letters and exchanges with friends, the exhibition illustrates that Dickens saw science as a potential force for good especially regarding curing disease and creating a cleaner and more healthy environment.

The exhibition reveals Dickens links to some of the greatest scientists and reformers of the day including Michael Faraday, Charles Darwin, Ada Lovelace, Mary Anning, Florence Nightingale and many more.

A little known aspect of Dickens is that his acute observations were sometimes used by the medical profession to aid diagnosis. A small wax figure of the ‘fat boy’ in Pickwick Papers is a reminder that his work was used by doctors in the 1950s when they were looking at why obese people sleep more than normal.

Dickens was fascinated by optical technologies and the exhibition features his telescope and a magic lantern. 

Although Dickens was believer in mesmerism or animal magnetism, he did not believe in Spiritualism and would often join with others to expose tricks used by those who wished to exploit the ‘vulnerable’. The exhibition includes a version of Pepper’s ghost which uses glass to create the illusion of a ghost. John Henry Pepper was a professor at The Royal Polytechnic Institute where he saw in 1862, inventor Henry Dircks Phantasmagoria which was an optical illusion to make a ghost appear on-stage. Pepper realized that the method could be used to incorporate into existing theatres. Pepper first showed the effect during a scene of Charles Dickens’s The Haunted Man, to great success.

This fascinating small exhibition illustrates that far from having no interest in science, Dickens used many of the latest scientific developments in his writing. Dickens had an extraordinary ability to observe some of smallest details of everyday life, but also saw the bigger picture. Whilst pointing out some of the human cost of the rapid industrialisation of the 19th century, Dickens had some faith that medical advances and scientific knowledge could have some beneficial benefits if practical uses could be found.

IMG_0285

The  Charles Dickens: Man of Science exhibition runs from 24 May – 11 November 2018 at the Charles Dickens Museum and is included in the admission ticket to the museum.

Visitors to the exhibition can also explore the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street, Bloomsbury, the London Townhouse into which Charles Dickens moved with his family in 1837. The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations. 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review : Expectations of the Past by Louise Weir at the Charles Dickens Museum – 13th March to 29th April 2018

One of Charles Dickens’s most celebrated stories is the inspiration for new exhibition at the Charles Dickens Museum. The exhibition entitled Expectations of the Past by Louise Weir is a collection of new work inspired by a combination of the locations, characters and themes of Great Expectations and the artist’s own history.

The exhibition presents Weir’s personal investigation through a combination of paintings, sketches and poetry. The artist followed in Dickens’s footsteps and travelled to the locations that were featured in Great Expectations. Starting at Gravesend and the Kent marshes, Weir began at St James’ Church at Cooling, Dickens’s inspiration for Pip’s first terrifying graveyard encounter with the escaped convict, Magwitch, which begins the book.

The artist’s sketches capture the often foreboding nature of the landscape that provided ideal backdrop to the shocking meeting between Magwitch and Pip.

The exploration of the landscapes of Great Expectations became far more personal journey with the untimely death of the artist’s father. From that point some of the novel’s themes of childhood memories and an atmosphere of loss are intertwined with the artist’s personal response to her loss.

Some of the sketchbooks, drawings and equipment in the exhibition demonstrate Weir’s creative process which often used the very elements of the landscape she was trying to capture;  grasses, seed-pods, flowers, feathers, earth and water from streams connecting landscape to painting.  

This small interesting exhibition explores how ‘Dickensian’ characters and landscapes provide inspiration for artists to pursue their own projects. Louise Weir’s characters in the paintings are often like ghosts haunting the landscape. In many ways, this reflects the works of Dickens which are so ingrained into our culture that we often see ‘Dickensian’ characters as part of everyday life .

Visitors to the exhibition can also explore the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street, Bloomsbury, the London Townhouse into which Charles Dickens moved with his family in 1837. The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations. Alongside Weir’s work, the exhibition will feature an original first edition of Great Expectations from the Museum’s collection.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Expectations of the Past at Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX

Exhibition dates: 13 March – 29 April 2018

Museum admission prices (inc. exhibition): Adults £9; Concessions £7; Children (6-16) £4; Under 6 free

Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10.00-17.00 (last admission 16.00).

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Expectations of the Past by Louise Weir at the Charles Dickens Museum – 13th March to 29th April 2018

An artist takes her own personal artistic investigation into one of Charles Dickens’s most celebrated stories in a new exhibition opening at the Charles Dickens Museum in March . The exhibition entitled Expectations of the Past by Louise Weir is a collection of new work inspired by a combination of the locations, characters and themes of Great Expectations and the artist’s own history. 

The exhibition presents a combination of paintings, sketches and poetry, the results of a project which began when Louise Weir was inspired to follow in Dickens’s footsteps and travel to the locations that informed Great Expectations. Heading for Gravesend and the Kent marshes, Louise Weir began at St James’ Church at Cooling, Dickens’s inspiration for Pip’s first terrifying graveyard encounter with the escaped convict, Magwitch, which begins the book. Louise Weir’s sketches capture the imposing nature of the looming landscape, the backdrop to the shocking meeting, while repeated visits to the Kentish sites led to a deeper exploration of the novel’s atmosphere.

What began as an exploration of the landscapes of Great Expectations became far more personal on the untimely death of Louise Weir’s father. From that point onwards, her work began to include poetry and to be imbued with childhood memories and an atmosphere of loss.

The sketchbooks and drawings in the exhibition demonstrate Weir’s creative process. Her work incorporates the very elements of the landscape she was capturing; at each place, she collected new items – grasses, seed-pods, flowers, feathers, earth – and used them as drawing materials. She took water from streams, mixed mud with paint, let rain fall on the artwork, pressed flowers and printed with them.

The exhibition also draws on Louise Weir’s own encounters with all sorts of ‘Dickensian’ characters in her childhood, growing up in a village pub in Cheshire. Louise Weir said, “The characters in Great Expectations really reminded me of all the people I grew up with – blacksmiths, farmers, really good, honest people like Joe Gargery. There were a lot of ‘Dickensian’ characters in my parents’ pub! Also, I feel a real affinity with Pip – I was desperate to leave my home village and I recognise the feeling of just needing to get away and re-invent yourself. The exhibition is about the events in Great Expectations and those in my life and, sometimes, not being able to distinguish between them. I’m creating this landscape that’s not really Dickens, it’s not really me – it’s this place that exists in between. I’m creating a make-believe space, somewhere where there are ghosts.”

Visitors to the exhibition can also explore the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street, Bloomsbury, the London Townhouse into which Charles Dickens moved with his family in 1837. The Charles Dickens Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection of Dickens-related material, including the desk at which he wrote Great Expectations. Alongside Weir’s work, the exhibition will feature an original first edition of Great Expectations from the Museum’s collection.

Expectations of the Past at Charles Dickens Museum, 48 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX

Exhibition dates: 13 March – 29 April 2018

Museum admission prices (inc. exhibition): Adults £9; Concessions £7; Children (6-16) £4; Under 6 free

Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 10.00-17.00 (last admission 16.00).

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here