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A Short Guide to Canary Wharf

If you walk amongst the shiny skyscrapers of Canary Wharf today, you may find it hard to believe that only forty years ago this was the derelict site of the once great West India Docks. However, although the cranes of the construction sites have taken over from the cranes in the docks, the transformation into Canary Wharf was not without its problems and setbacks.

The creation of an enterprise zone in the Isle of Dogs in the 1980s made the area attractive for potential investors, but finding the Investment to finance one of the largest schemes in the UK proved elusive. In 1987, the master building agreement was signed between Olympia & York and the LDDC for a 12.2 million sq. ft. development at Canary Wharf. Although building commenced and firms were beginning to move into some of the completed buildings, this progress was halted when in 1992 Olympia & York Canary Wharf Ltd went into Administration.

Olympia & York Canary Wharf Ltd came out of administration the following year and created a new company that would be eventually called the Canary Wharf Group. The next few years progress was slow until around the turn of the millennium (2000) when the completed DLR and Jubilee connections solved one of the great problems of the project namely transport for the increasing number of workers to the site.

The increase of high-profile businesses coming into Canary Wharf in the years since 2000 has seen considerable growth both in office space and the retail space that now numbers over 300 shops, bars and restaurants. The number of workers has also increased from 7.000 in 1994 to 120,000 people in 2012.

The Canary Wharf Group has created 18 million sq ft of superior office, retail and leisure space and the recent opening up of Wood Wharf as a mixed retail and residential may signal a change of emphasis and the creation a mini city in the Docklands.

Looking at the skyscrapers, visitors many think there is little to attract them, however if you look beyond the tall buildings there is plenty to explore as you wander around the estate.

Canary Wharf has over 20 acres of outdoor space and over 70 pieces of public art. The old docks are still there and provide a natural break to the large buildings and attract a wide range of ships throughout the year.

At certain vantage points like Westferry Circus, you get wonderful views of the Thames and the skyscrapers of the the City of London.

At the other end of the estate you get more views of the O2 and North Greenwich.

As well as 300 shops, cafes, bars and restaurants, Canary Wharf has a year-round events programme and one of London’s biggest roof gardens.

You can find a quiet oasis from the hustle and bustle of the estate in Westferry Gardens, Jubilee Park and Wood Wharf boardwalk.

A visit to West India Quay illustrates the way that the old warehouses and buildings of the old docks have been used for new purposes including restaurants, shops and the Museum of Docklands which tells the story of the Docklands and Canary Wharf.

Getting to Canary Wharf could not be easier with access from the Jubilee line and Dockland Light Railway that winds its way around the estate before going to the City of London, Stratford, Greenwich and other points of interest in East and South London. London City Airport is only a few miles away and you will often see planes over the top of the buildings making their way to and from the airport. The arrival of the Elizabeth Line in late 2022 will bring even more improved connections.

Canary Wharf is not on many tourist maps but is an intriguing mix of old and new, visitors will be surprised by the range of amenities and the green spaces and wonderful views.

For more information and tickets, visit the Canary Wharf website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Why not try out our new free magazine for extra content.

Review: Winter Lights 2020 in Canary Wharf – 16 to 25 January 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Canary Wharf is best known for being one of London’s main financial district but has one of the largest collections of public art in Europe. Throughout the year it has a series of festivals and events, one of Canary Wharf’s most popular festivals is the Winter Lights Festival.

The Winter Lights festival returns for a sixth year attracting some of the most imaginative light artists from around the world to create spectacular artworks, installations and interactive experiences.

The festival attracts large crowds and provides plenty of entertainment for all the family.

1: Mi-E Dor De Tine by Daisler Association, Middle Dock
This romantic message declares “I miss you”. Whilst there is no perfect translation, this is the closest adaptation for this Romanian saying. It refers to a deeper meaning about longing or missing someone.

Romania

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

2: Bit.fall by Julius Popp, Chancellor Passage
An ever-changing cascade of words created by thousands of falling illuminated water droplets. The words are derived from a number of live news sources including The Times, The Guardian and the BBC News.

Germany

3: The Clew by OTTOTTO, Cubitt Steps
Made from 100 circles of red light, The Clew is a beautiful structure created around the Cubitt Steps Bridge.

Portugal

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

4: Liquid Sound by Entertainment Effects, Cabot Square
Once again, the much-loved fountain in Cabot Square has a makeover for Winter Lights with a display of music and light.

UK

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

5: Absorbed by Light by Gali May Lucas, Cabot Square
Take a seat in between the three figures of Absorbed by Light, designed by the British Gali May Lucas and executed by Berlin-based sculptor Karoline Hinz.
Experience how it feels to be next to the characters on the bench.

UK

6: Sky on Earth by UAII Studio, Columbus Courtyard
This atmospheric UK premiere is inspired by the experience of a night flight over storm clouds. Columbus Courtyard will be transformed into an electrifying life sized cloud made of foam.

Czech Republic

7: Time & Tide by Paul & Pute, Columbus Courtyard
Time & Tide, with its hourglass design and colours inspired by nature, reminds us of the urgency of halting the plastic pollution of our oceans.

UK / Thailand

8: Shish-ka-buoy by Angus Muir Design, Westferry Circus
This fun installation is equally interesting by day as it is under the cover of darkness; during daylight hours, the large cluster landlocked six metre tall buoys absorb the light and give off a magical glow.
By night, thousands of LEDs inside create a whirl of colours and spherical gradients in this installation made from fully recyclable polyethylene marine buoys.

New Zealand

9: Lactolight by Lactolight, Westferry Circus
7,344 recycled plastic milk bottles become individual pixels in a giant low-res video screen. Programmed light depicting colours and patterns combined with a custom built soundscape gives you an overall sensory experience.

UK

10: Stratum by Studio Chevalvert, Westferry Circus
Stratum is an interactive installation made up of 92 illuminated metal totems. Visitors are invited to move their hand over the sensor to trigger movement in the artwork.

France

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

11: Mountain of Light by Angus Muir Design, Wren Landing
Mountain of Light is a monolithic installation, towering to a height of four meters and brought to life by a dramatic repertoire of lighting effects that begin with subtle changes in shade and culminate in an intense mash up of colours.

New Zealand

12: Ditto by Ithaca Studio, Wren Landing
A column of light repeating infinitely above and below the audience. Enter the space and experience light and sound swirling around overhead and underfoot trailing into infinity and creating beautiful reflections and colours in both daytime and evening.

UK

13: Luma Paint Light Graffiti by Lichtfaktor and Bomber Graffiti, Crossrail Place Roof Garden
Create your own unique light painting!
In 2008 Lichtfaktor developed the first real time Light Painting Software. It works on any object, from cars to buildings, transforming almost any object into a living paint canvas so you can create stunning paintings in just a few seconds.

Germany

14: Aquatics by Philipp Artus, Crossrail Place, Level -1, Quayside
Animated water creatures swim and dive around each other in this mesmerizing and delightful interactive light installation.

Germany

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

15: Desire by UxU Studio, Crossrail Place, Level -1, Quayside
Desire is a playful, sensual design that at first glance looks like giant, red lips. From the side, the image of the lips disappears, and you see a heartbeat instead – a heart beating faster with strong desires.

Taiwan

16: Constellations by Studio Joanie Lemercier, North Dock, viewing point at Crossrail Place, Level -1 Quayside
Making its London debut, Joanie Lemercier’s Constellations takes us on a trip through space with visuals projected onto a giant water screen with an electronic soundscapes by producer Paul Jebanasam.

France / Belgium

17: Seed of Life by Amberlights, Canada Place, Level -1, outside Waitrose
Enter the Seed of Life and discover a metallic rainbow spectrum of colours created by reflections and refractions from the natural elements of the daylight.

UK

18: Lightbench by LBO Lichtbank, Canada Square Park
A firm Canary Wharf favourite, our ten stunning light benches, form part of the permanent art collection.
Germany
Location 18 on our Winter Lights map

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

19: Neon Tree by Hawthorn, Canada Square Park
Neon flex will transform a tree into a striking sculpture in the heart of Canada Square Park. This colourful display will shine subtly by day and dazzle by night.

UK

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

20: The Bra Tree, Canada Square Park
Drawing inspiration from a tradition on the American ski slopes of throwing your bra onto a tree, Canary Wharf will host their own special illuminated version.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

21: Affinity by Amigo & Amigo and S1T2, Montgomery Square
Affinity is an immersive, interactive light sculpture inspired by the dazzling complexity and connectivity of the human brain.

Australia

22: Pools of Light, Jubilee Park
The ponds at Jubilee Park are getting a makeover for Winter Lights. See them transformed by thousands of colourful illumined orbs, weaving a stunning stream of light and sound through the park.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

23: Squiggle by Angus Muir Design, Jubilee Park
Squiggle is a winding mass of 450 metres of digital neon tubing twisting and turning to fill Jubilee Park. This unique sensory journey is created by the artist’s innovative manipulation of space and sense.

New Zealand

24: 16 bits by Parker Heyl, Jubilee Place
Parker Heyl has a mechanical engineering and robotics background and is interested in kinetic sculpture for live performance.The installation was developed as part of the Analog Future project at the Interactive Architecture Lab at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL

USA

25: Chromatic Play by Tine Bech Studio, Jubilee Park
These fun, illuminated sculptures invite you to interact with them. Each glowing creature has alien-like antennae fitted with interactive sensors, so when a visitor is in close proximity their presence is detected and the colours begin to change.

Denmark

26: SASHA Trees by ADAM DecoLight, Ten Bank Street Park
Ten Bank Street becomes a magical winterscape as this new park is illuminated with glowing fir trees. The striking neon colours of the trees create a fantastic contrast with the surrounding buildings.

Estonia

Behind many of the installations are serious intentions to raise awareness of environment and social issues. On a cold  winter evening, a walk around the festival will brighten the spirits and with lots of food and drink options is a fun evening out.

Canary Wharf Winter Lights Festival

16th to 25th January 4-10 pm
Throughout Canary Wharf
Canary Wharf
London
FREE

For more information, visit the Canary Wharf website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Crossrail Place Roof Garden in Canary Wharf

 

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Crossrail Place Roof Garden is a 300-metre enclosed garden which opened in 2015 that sits above the new Crossrail Station in Canary Wharf. 

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The unique latticed timber roof design by Foster + Partners spans 310m along its length It is filled with 780 triangular pillows which are continually filled with air. The roof allows air flow and natural irrigation to reach the plants in the roof garden.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The gardens have been planted with species from all corners of the globe, The designers have tried to draw on the area’s heritage, planting plants that are native to countries visited by ships of the West India Dock Company, which used to unloaded their cargo in the area where the station now sits.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The gardens sits almost exactly on the Meridian line and the planting is arranged by hemisphere. Asian plants such as bamboos, Japanese maple, magnolia to the east, and plants such as ferns,strawberry Tree, and sweet Gum tree from the Americas to the west.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Within the Roof Garden is a 60 seater performance space and features a number of sculpture in and around the garden. 

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Crossrail Place Roof Gardens have free admission and are open daily to the public until 9pm (or sunset in summer).

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Hidden London: London’s Lighthouse in Blackwall

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Thames has been a highway for shipping for centuries, however the river is not considered a dangerous river to navigate. Therefore it is a suprise that near Blackwall which is around six miles from the centre of London is a lighthouse.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The lighthouse is located in Trinity Buoy Wharf which for centuries was occupied by the Corporation of Trinity House and used for storing buoys and other marine equipment with workshops for testing, repairing and making equipment.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the 19th century, a lighthouse was built, not to aid the Thames river traffic but as an experimental lighthouse. In the original lighthouse built in the 1850s,famous scientist Michael Faraday carried out tests in electric lighting for lighthouses. The present lighthouse was constructed in 1864 and was used to experiment with electric light and different coloured lights, the results being checked at Charlton across the river. After the Second World War, the lighthouse was used for the training of lighthouse keepers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The lighthouse and the workshops were closed in 1988 and the area was acquired by the London Docklands Development Corporation. In 1998, Urban Space Holdings Ltd took control of the site on a long lease. The site has been, and continues to be, developed as “a centre for the arts and cultural activities”.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Inside the Lighthouse is the Longplayer installation, which has been running since the 31st December 1999. In addition to the listening post, there are 234 singing bowls, used as a part of the 66-foot-wide orchestral instrument to perform Longplayer Live, are on display. The steel structure, designed by Ingrid Hu, was commissioned to display and store the bowls and was installed in autumn 2012. Each tier of the structure, containing 39 bowls positioned sequentially, corresponds to one of the six concentric rings of the Longplayer Live instrument. Longplayer is programmed so it will not stop until 2999.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Lighthouse is the main attraction in Trinity Buoy Wharf but there are a number of other attractions including a small installation in shed called the Faraday Effect, an old Trinity lighthouse ship which has been turned into a Music Recording Studio, Old shipping containers have been painted and made into office blocks called Container City.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

But perhaps the last thing you would expect to find in such a place is the Fatboy’s Diner, a genuine 1940s American Diner from New Jersey that was bought over from the States then had a few short stays in different parts of London before finding its present site. The Diner itself is a bit of a celebrity featuring in the film Sliding Doors, music videos and magazines.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Trinity Buoy Wharf is located near to the financial district of Canary Wharf and visitors can enjoy great views of the Thames and the O2 whilst drinking a milkshake at an original American Diner next to a lighthouse.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to Mudchute Park and Farm on the Isle of Dogs

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A short distance from the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf is one of the largest city farms in Europe. This strange mix of urban and rural makes Mudchute Park and Farm a unique attraction for visitors.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Isle of Dogs is one of the fastest growing parts of London with a large number of developments, however this is relatively recent phenomenon. Up to the mid 18th century, the vast majority of the Isle of Dogs was uninhabited and used as pastures for animals.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The large open space where the Mudchute Park and Farm now stands was once grazing land until the mid 19th century when during the building of the nearby Millwall Docks led to the space being used for storage of millions of bricks. After the docks were completed, the area was used to dump the mud that was dredged from Millwall Dock. This mud was transferred from the dock to the field by a pipe leading to the area being called Mudchute. Over time the mud accumulated to create small hills and bumps, but towards the end of the 19th century there was concerns when the mudfield was considered a health hazard and the pipe which was discontinued in 1910.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the first World War, the area was used for allotments . At the beginning of the Second World War, the land was used for gun placements to attack the aircraft bombing the docks ( there is an Ack Ack gun in the farm to pay tribute to those who risked their lives). After the war, there were a number of schemes to use the land for housing. However a campaign by local residents and supporters led to the creation of an urban farm in 1977.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Since then Mudchute Park and Farm has developed into one of the largest city farms in Europe covering 32 acres and is maintained largely by local volunteers. The farm and park has worked hard to create diverse environment that attracts all forms of wild life.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Farm animals have been introduced over the years to give visitors a variety of experience, with a strong educational aspect with close ties with local schools and other community groups.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Whilst most visitors come from the local area, the farm and park has increased its visibility to attract visitors from further afield.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Mudchute Park and Farm is one of the hidden gems of London providing a wide range of rural pleasures near to the urban jungle of Canary Wharf.

For more information and tickets , visit the Mudchute website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Why not try out our new free magazine for extra content.

Review : Museum of London Docklands in West India Docks

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Museum of London Docklands is a museum in West India Docks which tells the history of the River Thames and the growth of Docklands.

The museum opened in 2003 in grade I listed early-19th century Georgian warehouses built in 1802 on the side of West India Docks near to the Canary Wharf financial district. Much of the museum’s collection is from the Museum of London and archives of the Port of London Authority,

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The museum includes series of multimedia presentations including videos and houses a large collection of historical artifacts, models, and pictures in a number of galleries. The museum also has a dedicated children’s gallery called Mudlarks, bookshop and cafe.

The museum through a series of permanent galleries tells the story of how the Docklands were created and how they have changed.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The gallery entitled No.1 Warehouse explores the museum building itself which was originally No. 1 Warehouse of the West India Docks. Opened in 1802, the West India Docks were London’s first enclosed dock system.The gallery illustrates how London’s historic docks and warehouses operated.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Trade Expansion (1600-1800) and London, Sugar & Slavery (1600 – today) galleries consider the effect of global trade and some of its consequences.

City and River (1800-1840), The early 19th century brought great change to London’s river and port. The huge docks complex was just one aspect of the development. New bridges spanned the Thames and the Thames tunnel was completed.

The ever popular Sailortown (1840-1850) gallery recreates the atmosphere of Sailortown, the London district, close to the river and docks, centred around Wapping, Shadwell and Ratcliffe.

The First Port of Empire (1840-1880) and Warehouse of the World (1880-1939) galleries illustrate how London and the docks became the centre of world trade.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Docklands at War (1939-1945) shows how important the docks were for the war effort and how they became a prime target for enemy bombers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The New Port, New City gallery (1945 – present) recounts the ups and downs of London’s upriver docks after the war culminating in their closure from the 1960s through to the early 1980s. It also shows how Docklands became the site of Europe’s largest regeneration project which was to divide government and local communities.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Museum of London Docklands is a fascinating free museum in a historic building which tells the remakable story of London’s Docklands. Located near to the Canary Wharf financial district, it is an ideal oportunity to discover how the area became the centre for world trade before it became a centre for finance.

Location : Museum of London Docklands, No.1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Review: Winter Lights 2019 in Canary Wharf – 15 to 26 January 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Canary Wharf is best known for being one of London’s main financial district but has one of the largest collections of public art in Europe. Throughout the year it has a series of festivals and events, one of Canary Wharf’s most popular festivals is the Winter Lights Festival.

The Winter Lights festival returns for a fifth year attracting some of the most imaginative light artists from around the world to create spectacular artworks, installations and interactive experiences.

The festival attracts large crowds and provides plenty of entertainment for all the family.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

1: Prismatica by RAW Design in collaboration with ATOMIC3, Jubilee Plaza

Prismatica turns heads with the countless colourful reflections made by its giant prisms. Visitors can walk amongst them to see city life in every colour of the spectrum and spin the prisms to make them dance.

2. BIT.FALL by Julius Popp, Chancellor Passage, Middle Dock

The speed at which information is sourced, exchanged and updated in our modern society is almost inconceivable, and more ephemeral than ever before. The work BIT.FALL translate this abstract process into an experience for the senses as an ever-changing cascade of words, derived from a live newsfeed on The Times website, falls down on a wall of water.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

3. Two Hearts by Stuart Langley, projection in Newfoundland Place, viewing point at Cubitt Steps

As the structure of this iconic residential skyscraper grows, lower level windows flicker and shine with light to momentarily form two illuminated and transient hearts, symbolic of the life and energy the building is poised to support.

4. Whale Ghost by Pitaya, Cubitt Steps

This monumentally-scaled kinetic sculpture echoes the marine mammal and fossil skeletons seen in natural history museums. Whale Ghost invites the visitor to spend a moment thinking about the impact of mankind on our biodiversity.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

5. Sasha Trees by Adam Decolight, Westferry Circus

Westferry Circus becomes a magical winterscape as we illuminate this beautiful location with glowing fir trees. The striking neon colours of the trees create a fantastic contrast with natural foliage surrounding them.

6. Blue Neuron by Zac Greening, Columbus Courtyard

Blue Neuron is a beautiful kinetic light installation built from reworked heat-treated plastic bottles. Zac’s inspiration comes principally from nature. Working in a wide range of media, from discarded plastic bottles to laser projections, his works often comment on issues such as sustainability, environmental degradation and consumption.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

7. Time & Tide By Paul & Pute, Columbus Courtyard

Time & Tide, with its hourglass design and colours inspired by nature, aims to remind us of the urgency of halting the plastic pollution of our oceans. Its form tells us that time is running out to repair this problem before the damage to our planet is irreversible.

8. Heofon Light Maze by Ben Busche of Brut Deluxe, Cabot Square

Heofon is an old English word for the sky. This fascinating light maze is based on triangular geometry which reflects and shifts light rays along the entire colour range of a rainbow. On the outer perimeter the panels are covered with a mirror film converting the interior into an infinity room.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

9. Colour Moves by Rombout Frieling Lab, Adams Plaza Bridge

Colour does not exist. Colour is in the mind. It is the result of complex processes of adjustment and comparison. Colour Moves is an immersive installation of pigments that react with specific wavelengths of light.

Oskar Krajewski/ © 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

10. Recyclism by Oskar Krajewski /Art of OK, Crossrail Place, Level 0

Artist Oskar Krajewski is working towards a new chapter in art history – Recyclism. Recyclism is a platform for artists and like-minded people who care about our global environment. Oskar’s sculptures are made almost entirely of recycled materials such as unwanted toys, obsolete electronics, plastic packaging or any everyday use objects.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

11. Aura by Ronan Devlin, North Dock, Adams Plaza

Aura creates a stunning spectacle on the water by combining art and technology. Camera sensors capture participant’s form and feelings and mirror them in real time onto a giant water spray in the dock.

12. We Could Meet by Martin Richman, Crossrail Place, Quayside Level -1

A permanent installation of more than 500 illuminated acrylic rods installed in a water channel, this engaging art work was commissioned by Canary Wharf Group in 2015.

13. Vena Lumen by Fontys Vena Lumen team, Crossrail Place Roof Garden, Level -1

Vena Lumen means pulsing light. Take a seat on this  bench, place your hand on the sensor and watch it transform your heartbeat into dancing light.

14. Enchanted Connections by Tine Bech Studio, Crossrail Place Roof Garden, Level 1

Enchanted Connections invites visitors to the Crossrail Place Roof Garden to interact with light and each other in an imaginative way.

Alexander Reichstein/ © 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

15. Last Parade by Alexander Reichstein, Crossrail Place Quayside, Level -1

Last Parade is a site-specific video installation that creates a wildlife reserve filled with rare animals and birds, where the shadows of endangered and threatened species march perpetually along the Canary Wharf Riverside, slowly fading out as their march ends.

16. Lightbench by LBO Lichtbank, Canada Square Park

These firm favourites light up Canada Square Park every evening as part of the permanent collection. The benches subtly change colour and are lined up to create a pleasing spectacle along the pathway.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

17. Submergence by Squidsoup, Montgomery Square

Submergence is a large, immersive, walkthrough light experience. This is the largest version ever shown, comprising of some 24,000 individual points of suspended light, that transforms the space into a hybrid environment where virtual and physical worlds coincide.

18. Light, Stone, Pavement by Raoul Simpson, Jubilee Park

Light, Stone, Pavement is a playful, contemporary take on the simple game of hopscotch, where the chalk lines are replaced by a glowing outline of electric luminescent ribbon triggered by the player’s progression through the game.

19. Flow by Squidsoup, Jubilee Park

Flow is a series of explorations using dynamically controlled points of light to visualise the flow of energy, data and objects. The piece is inspired by the myriad of cultural references to energy and flow patterns, from Aboriginal dreamtime paintings to Japanese wave and ripple designs.

Mürüde Mehmet/ © 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

20. Floating Islands by Mürüde Mehmet, Jubilee Park

Community artist Mürüde Mehmet will be working with local children in Tower Hamlets to construct colourful organic floating forms made from recycled bottles. The creations will be displayed on the running water streams at Canary Wharf, encouraging awareness of how much waste is created by single use plastic water bottles.

21. Angels of Freedom by OGE Collective, Jubilee Place

These beautiful illuminated wings travel around the world, connecting people by allowing everyone to become an angel in their own way.

Behind many of the installations are serious intentions to raise awareness of environment and social issues. On cold  winter evening, a walk around the festival will brighten the spirits and with lots of food and drink options is a fun evening out.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Canary Wharf Winter Lights Festival

 15th to 26th January 5-10 pm
Throughout Canary Wharf
Canary Wharf
London
FREE

For more information, visit the Canary Wharf website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Golf: Hero Challenge at Canary Wharf – 9th October 2018

After the excitement of the Ryder Cup, Londoners and visitors can see some of world’s leading golfers tee up for an innovative one-hole shootout in Canary Wharf. Some of the world’s leading players including Justin Rose will tee it up for this one-hole shootout, where they will hit the ball from a floating tee into a specially constructed floating green in South Dock amongst the skyscrapers in one of London’s main financial districts.

The exciting one-hole shootout called the Hero Challenge will act as the prelude to the Sky Sports British Masters, which takes place at Walton Heath Golf Club and will be hosted by World Number Two Justin Rose.

Joining Rose in Canary Wharf will be fellow Ryder Cup star Thorbjørn Olesen, the winning European Captain Thomas Bjørn, English duo Andrew ‘Beef’ Johnston and Matt Wallace, as well as Irishman Paul Dunne – the defending Sky Sports British Masters Champion.

This is a fun and atmospheric opportunity to see some of the world’s top golf pros in action, the first 2018 edition of the Hero Challenge took place at Edinburgh Castle in July and was won by American Matt Kuchar.

For those looking for more golf action, the Sky Sports British Masters takes place between the 11th – 14th October 2018 at Walton Heath Golf Club in Surrey. Walton Heath Golf Club which is an hour away from Central London was founded in 1903 and has two top class 18-hole golf courses.

Hero Challenge takes place at Canary Wharf (South Dock) on Tuesday October 9 – 6:30pm (live show begins), 5:00pm gates open

For  free tickets, visit the Eventbrite website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review – Tunnel: The Archaeology of Crossrail at the Museum of London Docklands from 10th February to 3rd September 2017

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Crossrail has been called one of the greatest feats of modern engineering in the UK, however the construction of London’s newest railway, which will be known as the Elizabeth line has given archaeologists a unique chance to explore some of the city’s most historically important sites. Since work began in 2009, the project has undertaken one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever in the UK, with findings of over 10,000 artefacts from almost every important period of the Capital’s history.

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Some of these artefacts are on display in a major new exhibition at the Museum of London Docklands with opens on the 10th February 2017.

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The construction of railway known as the Elizabeth Line has sliced through London from East to West and gone through many layers of London’s history. The exhibition follows the path of the new line with displays on as diverse areas such as  Abbey Wood in the south-east, Canning Town, Canary Wharf, Stepney Green, Liverpool Street, Tottenham Court Road, The West End and Paddington.

Some of the finds include

Prehistoric flints found in North Woolwich, showing evidence for Mesolithic tool making 8,000 years ago

Tudor bowling ball found at the site of the Tudor King John’s Court manor house in Stepney Green

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Roman iron horse shoes found near Liverpool Street Station

Medieval animal bone skates found near Liverpool Street Station

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Late 19th century ginger and jam jars from the site of the Crosse & Blackwell bottling factory near Tottenham Court Road station.

Human remains including one of the skeletons found near Liverpool Street Station from the 17th century Bedlam cemetery, which a DNA has shown died from the Plague.

Two of the most spectacular finds are not yet on display, digging under Canary Wharf, part of a woolly mammoth’s jaw bone and a fragment of amber that was estimated to be 55 million years old were found. Both items are so significant that they are currently being analysed at the Natural History Museum.

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The exhibition illustrates some of the problems of London archaeology with the mystery of the Walbrook skulls which are from different periods but were all found together.

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As well as the archaeological finds, large screens show how the massive engineering project of Crossrail burrowed its way beneath the London city streets and beyond and how the archaeologists worked on sites all over London to increase the historical knowledge of the city.

This fascinating free exhibition explores a modern phenomenon in which major construction sites in London are often for fixed period used for intense archaeological digs which allows a more detailed picture of London to emerge. The Crossrail excavations are on a massive scale and have produced remarkable finds that will take years to process. The exhibition offers a tantalising snapshot of the engineering and archaeological processes involved and some of the finds.

Tunnel: the archaeology of Crossrail at the Museum of London Docklands

Friday 10 February – Sunday 3 September 2017

FREE exhibition

Our Video review available here

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

To find out more about the exhibition, visit the Museum of London Docklands website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Winter Lights Festival in Canary Wharf from 16th to 27th January 2017

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Canary Wharf is East London’s financial district which puts on a series of events throughout the year, January 16th saw the launch of the 2017 Winter Lights Festival which offers some 30 spectacular light installations throughout the area. The sculptures, structures and installations are the creations of some of the most innovative artists and designers from around the world who present work in the many different forms of light technology.

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Some of the highlights include:

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Ovo 

This large light installation comes to the UK for the first time for Winter Lights at Canary Wharf. On entering Ovo, visitors are surrounded by light and soundscapes.

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On Your Wavelength

On Your Wavelength has been developed specifically for Winter Lights at Canary Wharf. This interactive light sculpture and music installation is controlled by a participant’s mind via an EEG headset. As their thought patterns change, the electrical data from their brain is used to control the music and create intricate light patterns, which illuminate a large-scale light tunnel fitted with over 30,000 LEDs.

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Passage

This interactive installation interprets sound and visitor footprint by taking the form of a digital scanner, becoming a representation of the data trail that we leave behind us wherever we go. When a visitor enters Passage’s detection field they are scanned to form a 3D pixel picture accompanied by a unique noise footprint, frozen briefly in the moment before disappearing to make way for the next visitor’s data.

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Water Wall

Water Wall is an interactive installation that explores the relationship of movement, shape and sound through the mediums of light and water. A mist screen transforms water into a canvas for bright projections, allowing movement and sound. The images projected onto the mist screen seemingly float over the surface of the water creating a dynamically changing immersive experience.

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Cathedral of Mirrors

Twelve towering columns of light respond to visitors’ movements via high-tech sensors. Pulses of light are sent racing through the columns generating more light energy as people congregate. Cathedral of Mirrors envelops viewers in a three-dimensional field of light where they themselves become part of the expression.

Access to the illuminations is free which are in different locations throughout Canary Wharf  and you can download the brochure here to find out more about the festival and the whole list of illuminations and locations.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here