Home » Posts tagged 'British Library'

Tag Archives: British Library

Exhibition Review : Punk 1976-78 at the British Library – 13th May to 2nd October 2016

 

DSCN6054

The British Library celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Punk phenomenon with an exhibition that explores the formative years of its development. The free exhibition considers the  impact of punk with a number of items on display include fanzines, audio recordings, posters, flyers, gig tickets and clothing.

DSCN6117

The exhibition also sets the rise of Punk in its historical context, the late 1970s was a time of considerable social and political upheaval with high unemployment, the decline of many industries and racial tensions.

DSCN6118

Although the exhibition locates elements in the development of Punk in the French Situationist movement and New York City art-rock scene, it is within a relative short period in the UK between 1976 and 1978 when the underground movement moves in the mainstream. An important factor in Punk becoming more widely known were the promotion of the Sex Pistols whose live appearance on the TV programme Today and releasing the alternative jubilee anthem God Save the Queen created a media storm that led to the band and the music being vilified in the press.

DSCN6062

Although the Sex Pistols were often one of the main faces of Punk, it was other aspects of the phenomenon of punk that would lead to considerable changes in the music business and beyond. The exhibition features a wide range of items that illustrate how Punk turned its back on many of the accepted practices of the music business and advocated that doing it yourself was better than being under the control of record labels or the music press.

DSCN6108

Most people agree that Punk played a pivotal role in the rise of the independent music scene and how the scene was promoted, the exhibition features a range of rare fanzines, unique flyers, exclusive audio recordings and original record sleeves, many of which have never been on public display before. Some of the highlights include copies of fanzines from 1977 including the first punk fanzine Sniffin’ Glue and the first and only edition of the Sex Pistols’ official fanzine, Anarchy in the UK.

DSCN6068

Rare records in the exhibition include a copy of the Sex Pistol’s God Save the Queen single, which was never released because the A&M record label signed and dropped the band within one week and John Peel’s personal copy of the Undertones’ single, Teenage Kicks. Punk fashion is also features with original clothing from the SEX boutique run by Malcolm McLaren and Vivienne Westwood at 430 King’s Road, London.

DSCN6102

This small exhibition located in the Library’s Entrance Hall Gallery provides an interesting overview to the formative growth of the Punk phenomenon which although relatively short-lived left a considerable legacy on British culture. The more outspoken aspects of the movement tend to overshadow the benefits of the movement in the development and creation of more independent avenues to making and promoting music, magazines and fashion.

DSCN6080

The British Library will also hold a series of events related to the exhibition which include: An Evening with John Lydon, lead singer of the Sex Pistols . Me, Punk and the World: Bernard Rhodes in Conversation, Bernard Rhodes was at the forefront of developing the punk scene in the UK and went on to manage the Clash. Buzzcocks: In their Own Words, an evening with original members Steve Diggle and Pete Shelley and manager Richard Boon. Stories from the She Punks, featuring Tessa Pollitt from the first all-female punk band The Slits, Gina Birch from the Raincoats, Helen Reddington (Helen McCookerybook of The Chefs) and Jane Woodgate from the Mo-Dettes.

DSCN6066

The exhibition is accompanied by a Punk pop-up shop selling vinyl, t-shirts, prints and books and will offer limited edition prints by punk photographer Sheila Rock, along with a range of merchandise including record players, homeware and jewellery.

The British Library’s punk season is part of Punk London, a year of events, gigs, films, talks and exhibits celebrating 40 years of punk heritage influence in London.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Punk 1976-78 at the British Library – 13th May to 2nd October 2016

Monday – Thursday 9.30 – 20.00,

Friday 9.30 – 18.00,

Saturday 9.30 – 17.00,

Sunday and Bank Holidays 11.00 – 17.00

The exhibition is free.

For more information or book tickets, visit the British Library website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

 

Exhibition Review : Alice in Wonderland at the British Library – 20th November 2015 to 17th April 2016

DSCN1102

In a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice in Wonderland, a free exhibition exploring the legacy of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland opens at the British Library which will run from 20th November 2015 to 17th April 2016. The  exhibition considers the enduring popularity of Lewis Carroll’s original story and the first illustrations by John Tenniel and how it has been reimagined and re-illustrated in the past 150 years after it was published.

DSCN1085

One of the main highlights of the exhibition is the original handwritten manuscript of Alice’s Adventures Under Ground with 37 carefully drawn illustrations by Carroll. There is also two first editions of Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland illustrated by John Tenniel, including the suppressed first edition which was recalled due to Carroll and Tenniel’s dissatisfaction with the quality of the illustrations. In this section there is more information about Lewis Carroll (Charles  Dodgson) and the inspiration for the story, Alice Liddell. The story was not an instant success but quickly gained popularity leading to the creation of Alice memorabilia including wooden figurines, tea tins and a postage stamp case which are shown in the exhibition.

DSCN1087

The humour and surreal nature of the story has led to a large number of illustrators creating their own version of the book. Illustrations by Mabel Lucie Attwell, Charles Robinson, Mervyn Peake and Salvador Dali are just a sample shown illustrating the story’s continuing appeal.

DSCN1072

It has not been only books, the story has been recreated in ballets, musicals, operas, plays, films and computer games. The exhibition features the first movie adaption of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, a silent film from 1903 by Cecil Hepworth and Percy Stow.

DSCN1091

This small exhibition located near the entrance of the British Library is a wonderful way to discover and understand the enduring fascination with Alice in Wonderland. There is plenty of humour and fun in the exhibition and there is even an attractive Alice in Wonderland Pop-up Shop (until 31 January 2016) and a series of Alice-inspired events, including a family workshop, an evening of live comedy, music and experiments hosted by Festival of the Spoken Nerd .

DSCN1106

Exhibition opening hours

Monday – Thursday 9.30 – 20.00, Friday 9.30 – 18.00, Saturday 9.30 – 17.00, Sunday and Bank Holidays 11.00 – 17.00

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like to find out more about the exhibition, visit the British Library website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song at the British Library from 16th October 2015 to 16th February 2016

DSCN0237

West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song is a major exhibition at the British Library which will run from 16 October 2015 – 16 February 2015. The exhibition traces a thousand years of  West Africa’s  history, drawing on over 200 manuscripts, books, sound and film recordings as well as artworks, masks and colourful textiles from the British Library’s vast African collections and beyond.

DSCN0231

Although West Africa is known for its strong oral traditions, the exhibition provides evidence of a strong written tradition ranging from great manuscript libraries of the early Middle Ages to the acclaimed modern writers of the region.

DSCN0142

The first part of the exhibition explores the many oral traditions of the region and the many mighty empires that dominated the region, it also features some of the documents and items that show the influence of Islam in the area from medieval times. Timbuktu in Mali, in particular was a centre of learning and for centuries has been the location of important Islamic manuscripts. One of the most intriguing objects of the exhibition is a remarkable Saddlebag Qu’ran.

DSCN0147

Islam was not the only religion that swept through West Africa, the 19th century bought Christian missionaries who sought to convert the local population. The various ways this was carried out is shown in the exhibition which shows that even when the local population did convert, it did not totally replace the older traditions.

DSCN0154

West Africa like many regions in Africa suffered from the curse of the slave trade, the voices of those that suffered are seldom heard but the exhibition features the work of some who became intellectual figures in their new home. Letters, texts and life accounts written by Olaudah Equiano, the most famous 18th century British writer of African heritage, the enslaved and freed scholar Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, Ignatius Sancho, who was born on a slave ship and went on to become an influential intellectual figure, and Phillis Wheatley, who was enslaved as a child and went on to write Romantic poetry. The importance of these figures was that their success countered the widely accepted myths that Africans were ‘backward’ and ‘ignorant’.

DSCN0199

The 20th century saw enormous cultural change in West Africa with the many independence movements fighting for justice and power. Although independence bought some autonomy, the political landscape was complex and many writers and performers like Nobel prize-winning Nigerian author Professor Wole Soyinka and  creator of Afrobeat and human rights activist Fela Kuti gave voice to the ongoing struggles.

DSCN0180

The cultural dynamism of West Africa has not been confined to the African continent, the exhibition explores how the African tradition of Masquerade influenced the carnival parades. One of the largest is the Notting Hill Carnival in London and in the centre of the exhibition is a specially commissioned costume designed by Brixton-based artist Ray Mahabir.

DSCN0167

The last part of the exhibition explores the modern West Africa which although not free of conflict is a ‘cultural powerhouse’ with many highly respected writers, designers, artists, musicians and entrepreneurs.

DSCN0215

This colourful and vibrant multi media exhibition  offers considerable insights into the intellectual, musical and artistic achievements of West Africa. It provides plenty of evidence that these achievements are not just recent but go back at least 1000 years. The British Library’s vast African collections illustrate the often troubled times of the region but also celebrates the remarkable diversity and resilience of the people to hold onto ancient traditions, yet assimilate change.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the British Library website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Review : Magna Carta (An Embroidery) by Cornelia Parker at the British Library – 15 May to 24 July 2015

DSCN3918

Magna Carta (An Embroidery) is a major new artwork by the acclaimed British artist Cornelia Parker that celebrates the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta in 2015. The artist captured the Wikipedia article on Magna Carta on 15 June 2014 and transferred it as a printed pattern on fabric. The fabric was then divided into 87 sections and sent around the country to be stitched by more than 200 people. The sections were subsequently reunited and sewn together by the Embroidery Studio at the Royal School of Needlework, the finished piece is almost 13 metres long.

DSCN3901

Cornelia Parker

The bulk of the text has been stitched by prisoners under the supervision of Fine Cell Work which trains prisoners in paid, skilled, creative needlework. The more detailed pictures, emblems and logos were stitched by highly skilled members of the Embroiderers’ Guild, a national charity that promotes and encourages the art of embroidery and related crafts, alongside embroiderers from the Royal School of Needlework and the leading embroidery company Hand & Lock.

DSCN3915

At the artist’s invitation, contributions were invited by other people to reflect the different aspects of the document and how the same words may have different significance for different people. Dedicated words and phrases were stitched by judges, QCs, barristers, solicitors, campaigners for civil liberties, civil rights, political rights and human rights, activists, advocates, clerics, diplomats, members of parliament, barons and baronesses (hereditary and life peers), entrepreneurs, psychoanalysts, curators, artists, architects, filmmakers, designers, composers, musicians, restaurateurs, writers, playwrights, publishers, editors, journalists, commentators, broadcasters, librarians, academics, students and young people.

DSCN3903

Amongst those who contributed were director of Liberty Shami Chakrabarti (stitching ‘Charter of Liberties’) and Baroness Doreen Lawrence (‘justice’, ‘denial’ and ‘delay’), Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales (‘user’s manual’), Edward Snowden (‘liberty’) and Jarvis Cocker (‘Common People’).

DSCN3905

The embroidery’s subject matter reflects how the Magna Carta has been used to reflect cherished beliefs but has been constantly reinterpreted over the centuries, the same process is at work on the Wikipedia page which is constantly amended to reflect the latest debate. Cornelia Parker considers the Magna Carta (An Embroidery) is a communal activity like the Bayeux Tapestry, but with more emphasis on the word rather than the image.

DSCN3899

Magna Carta (An Embroidery) is an intriguing addition to the British Library major programme of events, exhibitions and digital projects at the Library examining Magna Carta in this 800th anniversary year.  It runs alongside the Library’s largest ever exhibition Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy (open until 1 September). Magna Carta (An Embroidery) celebrates that in whatever medium, The Magna Carta possesses the power of ideas and words to change the world, however these ideas and words are in constant flux and are open to interpretation. Looking at some of the contributors to the embroidery, many of these ideas and words have a modern relevance that illustrate the fight for freedom and liberty is an ongoing process.

Magna Carta (An Embroidery) was commissioned by the Ruskin School of Art at the University of Oxford in partnership with the British Library.

Entrance to Magna Carta (An Embroidery) is free and the embroidery will be on display from 15 May to 24 July 2015 at the British Library.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like more information, visit the British Library website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review – Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy – edited by Claire Breay and Julian Harrison ( British Library Publishing )

magna carta pic

On the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, the British Library have produced an extensive exhibition and catalogue that explores the origins of the original treaty and its enormous political legacy. Drawing on the considerable historical collections of the British Library and impressive loans from a number of sources, the story of the Magna Carta is placed into its historical context of the medieval world and looks at its evolution into an iconic document that has been used and abused up to the present day.

In the introduction in the catalogue, Nicholas Vincent considers the intention of the exhibition and the book is ‘to explain Magna Carta’s context, but also how reality has diverged from myth.’ It is this question of reality and myth that is crucial to any understanding of the document. Whilst the Magna Carta is one of the world’s most famous documents, it is also one of the most misunderstood leading to the belief that it can be used to protect people from tyranny in all its guises.

The first part of the book  considers how Magna Carta was granted by King John in 1215 as a practical solution to a political crisis. The political impasse between King John and the Barons bought the country to the verge of Civil War and the charter represented a chance for bloodshed to be avoided with a compromise that would satisfy both sides. As the book clearly illustrates these type of compromises between Kings and followers had a long history but generally ended in failure due to each side reneging on the treaty. This outcome was the fate of the Magna Carta when King John asked the Pope to rule the agreement unlawful, Pope Innocent III issued the Papal Bull annulling the Magna Carta soon after the charter was signed. Both the exhibition and the book offer considerable insights into the motives and agenda’s of some of the major players. The relation between King John, the Barons and the Church was complex and the wide range of medieval manuscripts illuminate how the Magna Carta was created and evolved. However it not just documents, the exhibition also has a remarkable range of objects including some rather gruesome items from King John’s tomb at Worcester and remarkably the  mitre, buskins and slippers of Archbishop Hubert Walter, King John’s first Archbishop of Canterbury.

One of the most interesting aspects of the Magna Carta story is  how the fate of the charter was transformed by the death of King John in 1216, David Carpenter in his essay in the catalogue considers that ‘it was John’s death that saved Magna Carta.’ Part of the reason for this change of fortune was that the political chaos of the various factions left John’s heir, the nine year old Henry in a desperate position. Henry’s guardians placated the Barons by accepting a new version of charter and in 1225, the charters were placed on a more secure footing by Henry himself by issuing new versions with his full support. However these new versions did not mean that peace was guaranteed, the usual royal intrigues continued and breaches of the charter were common.

The second half of the exhibition considers the Magna Carta’s legacy and how it has been interpreted over the centuries. Champion and Lock in their essay consider  how the first printing of the Magna Carta in 1508 led to the Great Charter being transformed ‘from a primary statue to an international symbol of freedom and liberty.’ This historical evolution involved considerable contributions from legal minds, politicians, reformers and political institutions and inspired the Petition of Right (1628) and the Bill of Rights (1689), clauses of the Great Charter were also invoked unsuccessfully by Thomas More and Charles I in their trials.

As British influence grew in other parts of the world, so did the influence of the Magna Carta to colonists. It was in North America that this conflict of interest  found its most dramatic outcome. The American Revolution invoked the spirit of the Magna Carta to pursue claims against British tyranny, the succesful campaign led to the  Declaration of Independence and the US Bill of Rights. Two original copies of these iconic documents are featured in the exhibition.

The overseas revolutions and upheavals of the 18th century led to the push for parliamentary reforms in Britain, once again the spirit of Magna Carta were used to offer legitimacy to various causes. The considerable propaganda of this time created a connection between Magna Carta and parliamentary reform in the popular imagination, the Great Reform Act of 1832 was generally presented as a new Magna Carta.

The reforms within Britain had unintended consequences within the larger British Empire, the essay by Zoe Laidlaw in the catalogue considers how Britons who had settled all around the world took the preservation of their rights very seriously and frequently invoked the Magna Carta to pursue their claims. Perhaps more surprisingly, the Great Charter was used as a weapon against imperialism by Mohandas Gandhi and Nelson Mandela.

The final chapter in the catalogue entitled Magna Carta in the Modern Age by Joshau Rozenburg considers how the myths about the Magna Carta have led to its iconic status but disguises its limited legal relevance. Just three clauses of the original statute remain law of which the most famous clause 29 is the one most frequently mentioned. Even these clauses are not often useful in cases, the author could not find a single modern case that was decided on the strength of Magna Carta alone.
Has this made Magna Carta irrelevant in the modern age ? the 1941 memo in the exhibition written by a bureaucrat  describes the Magna Carta  as  ‘ a bit of parchment, more than 700 years old, rather worse of wear.’ The proposed gift of this parchment to the United States for their help in the war seems to be a strange mix of distorted values, but is just one of the many fascinating stories centred around the unremarkable piece of parchment that has inspired much of the most important legislation all over the world.

This wonderfully informative and intriguing book, full of lavish illustrations complements the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition and tell the remarkable story of how a document granted by King John in 1215 as a practical solution to a political crisis became a rallying call for rights and liberties over the centuries and all around the world. This book offers the reader a chance to consider many of the document’s  myths  and understand  how the reality of the document’s origins and evolution is far stranger than any fictional account.

 Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information of buy a copy of the book, visit the British Library shop here

Magna Carta: Law Liberty, Legacy. An exhibition at the British Library, 13th March–1st September 2015

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Book Review : Murder Underground by Mavis Doriel Hay (British Library )

murdunder

This book is one of the new editions of the successful British Library Crime Classic series. This is the third book by Mavis Hay that the British Library has re-published, having already re-published two of Hay’s novels “Death on the Cherwell” and “The Santa Klaus Murder”.  Mavis Doriel Hay (1894-1979) was a novelist during what was considered the golden age of British crime fiction. Her three detective novels were first published in the 1930’s.

Murder Underground was the first mystery book written by Mavis Doriel Hay and is set in North London around the area frequented by the Northern Line. When Miss Pongleton is found murdered on the stairs of Belsize Park station, her fellow boarders at the Frampton hotel set out to find the culprit.

The book is almost a cross between Agatha Christie and P G Wodehouse, and although set in North London it has a gentle rural feel displayed by the leading characters, their day to day experiences and the description of the local area. Whilst there is no Miss Marple or Poirot, the amateur sleuths of the Frampton Hotel attempt to make sense of the murder, whilst the bumbling antics of the murdered woman’s nephew almost give the reader a sense of comic relief.

Unlike many crime/mystery novels, Murder Underground has no central character; Hay cleverly transports the reader into the  thoughts and feelings of our cast, thus we are able to gain insights into their motives and secrets. Hay, gives the reader a real sense of how the ‘well to do’ live in 1930’s Britain, the Frampton Hotel is a place for ‘gentle and respectable’ residents, where Mrs Bliss ‘cares’ for her residents with a sense of superiority and condescension, although the reader should be able to detect a more earthy upbringing of the said lady. The murderer is finally revealed by a combination of events, and peace is restored and the threads of romance interspersed in the novel come to fruition.

Murder Underground does not have the gore of modern crime/murder fiction, but in its gentle way the plot offers a distinctly different experience. One of Hay’s strengths in this novel is the way she illustrates to the reader a sense of Britain in the 1930’s, especially the changing of social structures and the uncertainties of the time. Ultimately I agree with P D James who suggests “The detective stories of the interwar years were paradoxical. They might deal with violent death, but essentially they were novels of escape.”

Murder Underground offers the modern reader an entertaining escape back to the 1930’s, this novel will especially appeal to the fans of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers. Although Hay never reaches the highs of those novelists, she does possess a sense of comedy that is rarely seen in this genre.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information of buy a copy of the book, visit the British Library shop here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

London Craft Week – 6th to 10th May 2015

Watchmaking at Vacheron Constantin. Photocredit Vacheron Constantin

 Photo  (Vacheron Constantin)

London has a long and distinguished heritage regarding Arts and Crafts, to celebrate this heritage there will be a large range of events in the London Craft Week. The new annual event will showcase exceptional craftsmanship through  an exciting programme featuring hidden workshops and unknown makers alongside celebrated masters, famous shops, studios, galleries and luxury brands.

London Craft Week will take place from the 6th May and run through to 10th May 2015. The event will be celebrating traditional craftsmanship but will also feature exciting new talent.

The inaugural London Craft week will feature an impressive line-up of demonstrations at major department stores including Fortnum & Mason, Fenwick, and Selfridges, as well as  London hubs of style and creativity SOANE Britain, Mulberry, and Asprey. Prestigious institutions will take part, such as the Wellcome Trust (with Heatherwick Studio), the British Library, and the Victoria & Albert Museum, who with the Crafts Council will present their partnership exhibition ‘What is Luxury?’, and will also host the Heritage Crafts Association’s ‘A Place for Craft’ conference. The Crafts Council will also present COLLECT: The International Art Fair for Contemporary Objects, held at the Saatchi Gallery.

Ester Segarra

Photo (Ester Segarra)

All over the city will be a number of events that will allow the visitor to understand some of the processes and skills needed to produce wonderful objects, in some workshops, there is even the chance to try the techniques yourself.

Some of the workshops include  Watchmaking and Hand-Engraving  at Vacheron Constantin, Catarina Riccabona will be fine weaving at St James’s Church Piccadilly and master craftsmen James Ducker and Deborah Carré will set up shop in the window of Gieves & Hawkes, Vigo Street to demonstrate some of the 200+ rigorous steps that go into hand-sewn shoes.

Stitching sole - Process 111 of the 200+ steps in making handsewn shoes - stitching the soles using only an awl, waxed hemp thread and bristles, at Carreducker

Interest in well designed crafts with exceptional craftsmanship has grown considerably in the last few years and led to the creation of a number of new designers and artists who are starting businesses and making a name for themselves. London Craft week will celebrate London’s reputation as a centre of creativity and innovation by highlighting this vibrant and growing sector and pay tribute to the highly skilled craftspeople at work in the city.

For a full list of events, visit the London Craft week website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here