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Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan in Broadgate Arena

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Broadgate near Liverpool Street station is the location of a number of fascinating works of art, one of the most popular is Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell by Barry Flanagan. Flanagan was born in 1941, in North Wales. In the 1950s, he studied architecture at Birmingham College of Art and Crafts and sculpture at Saint Martin’s School of Art in London from 1964 to 1966.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

He was best known for several permanent public sculptures, such as his giant bronze Hare on Bell in Man in New York, Thinker on a Rock in Washington, D.C and Leaping Hare on Crescent and Bell at Broadgate. The sculpture in Broadgate is made of patinated bronze and was unveiled in 1988.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All these sculptures show the playfulness of Flanagan’s work, play was an important aspect of his work. He had his first solo show in London in 1960s followed by exhibitions in Amsterdam, in Berne and the Hayward Gallery.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In his later work, the hare became Flanagan’s emblem, he was fascinated by its fun and symbolic nature. Flanagan’s hares are well known public sculptures all around the world. Flanagan died in 2009 of motor neurone disease.

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London : 1968 at Tate Britain – 7th May to 31st October 2018

Vote for Guy Fawkes, 1968 Screenprint – Courtesy Alexander Peter Dukes

To mark 50 years since the protests of 1968, a new free display at Tate Britain reveals how artists in London responded to this watershed moment in political and social history.

1968 witnessed a series of protests across the globe. Although the different movements were not united by one singular goal, there was a shared sense of youthful rebellion and a struggle against oppression that was both personal and political.

 

1968 Screenprint – Courtesy Alexander Peter Dukes

London: 1968 features a series of iconic agit-prop posters by the Camden Poster Workshop, who moved their studio into the London School of Economics during the student occupation in October. Inspired by the Atelier Populaire in Paris, between 1968-1971 anyone could commission a poster from the workshop, using screenprinting equipment to create posters for workers, tenants’ associations and liberation movements from all over the world. The posters leave behind a permanent visual record of pertinent issues of the time such as rent and industrial strikes, the Vietnam War and civil rights movements in Ireland, America and South Africa.

 

Vuka: Stand by the Revolutionary Patriots of Victoria West, South Africa, 1969 Screenprint – Courtesy Alexander Peter Dukes

Also in the display, a film by Patricia Holland looks at the occupation of Hornsey School of Art by its students, while archive material delves deeper into the activities of these artists and the wider impact of May 68.

London: 1968 brings together work by radical artists including Barry Flanagan, Richard Long, Joseph Beuys and Mario Merz who participated in the landmark exhibition When Attitudes Become Form at London’s ICA in 1969. The exhibition was initiated and researched in the immediate aftermath of May 68, reflecting its idealism. Just as the student protestors were questioning the political, social and cultural establishment, these artists were questioning the nature of the art object.

 London: 1968 coincides with 1968: Protest and the Photobook, a free display at Tate Modern bringing together politically engaged photobooks made during this period. The photobooks reflect a surge of political activism in places such as France, Japan, Italy, Mexico and Czechoslovakia. Some document marches and demonstrations, with the photographer bearing witness to collective action, while in others, the photobook is itself a medium of protest, conveying a specific perspective on events.

For more information, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Exhibition Review : Conceptual Art in Britain 1964 –1979 at Tate Britain from 12th April to 29th August 2016

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Conceptual Art in Britain 1964-1979 explores how artists working in Britain began to question the nature of art. The exhibition presents the development of the movement from its origins in the mid-1960s through to the late 1970s, bringing together 70 works by 21 artists to demonstrate the radical, thought-provoking and politically engaged aspects of this period in art history.

The exhibition features work by a number of influential artists of the period including Keith Arnatt, Richard Long, Bruce McLean, Stephen Willats, Sue Arrowsmith, Braco Dimitrijević, Barry Flanagan, Hamish Fulton, Margaret Harrison, Ed Herring, Susan Hiller, John Hilliard, John Latham, Bob Law and David Tremlett.

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In a period of considerable political and social change, conceptual artists began to question some of the assumptions of art and used theories and philosophies to underpin their own approach to art. This questioning of widely held assumptions was part of a wider cultural movement that transformed many areas adapting ideas from a number of sources.

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In many ways, Conceptual art considered the idea and concept was placed above the work’s material form, this shift was illustrated by works such as Michael Craig-Martin’s An Oak Tree 1973 – a glass of water on a glass shelf is accompanied by text suggesting possible meanings of the work.

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This interplay between the artist and the viewer is a crucial aspect of the movement, many of the artists rejected the dominance of abstract modern art and believed that the ‘real world’  could offer new avenues of form and content.

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The first room is dominated by Roelof Louw’s Soul City (Pyramid of Oranges) 1967 – a pile of oranges that in its original form visitors were invited to take an orange thereby changing the work gradually into a different form.

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Some artists began to view art as a performance, Keith Arnatt’s Art as an Act of Retraction sees the artist literally eating his own words and Self Burial show the same artist in a series of photographs disappearing into the ground. Bruce McLean Posework for Plinths 3 follows a similar approach.

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Other artists used common applications of art to subvert the message, Victor Burgin’s critique of modern consumerism, Possession 1976 offers a poster with its own radical message at the bottom. Many of the works in the exhibition illustrate that they were part of wider and radical social and political movements. Class inequality and gender identity were just two areas of expression for artists, Mary Kelly’s examination of the mother-child relationship in her Post-Partum Document 1974-8 explores her personal relationship within the context of ideas associated with the women’s movement.

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This interesting and thought-provoking exhibition explores the concept of art itself, the conceptual artists in Britain at this period were not the first to question the concept of art but their particular approach was tied to a response to the radical changes taking place within the country at the time. Whilst many people in the art world would suggest this movement was very influential, the artists themselves are not widely known or shown. A walk around the exhibition perhaps explains this paradox, the radical aspect of the movements seems very dated and belong to a time when different world ideologies provided their own theories of the modern world. However, many of the ideas of conceptual art found greater relevance in the Information age, the use of language and text has exploded boundaries into a myriad of forms which offers questions of reality and virtual reality.

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Many visitors may see a pile of sand, a pyramid of oranges or a glass of water and say ‘ Is this art ?’, it is this debate that lay behind many of the ideas of conceptual art and provides some indication of the influence of the movement.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

Conceptual Art in Britain 1964 –1979 from 12th April to 29th August 2016

Tate Britain

Admission £12.00 (£10.90 without donation).

Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50)

Open daily from 10.00 – 18.00

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here