Home » Posts tagged 'Auguste Rodin'

Tag Archives: Auguste Rodin

The Making of Rodin at Tate Modern from 29 April to 31 October 2021

 

Tate Modern will present a major new exhibition of Auguste Rodin (1840-1917). It will show how he broke the rules of classical sculpture to create a dramatically different image of the human body, illustrating the uncertainties of the modern age. Featuring over 200 works, many of which have never been shown outside France, The Making of Rodin will offer unique insight into Rodin’s ways of thinking and making. In a unique collaboration with the Musée Rodin, Tate visitors will be able to both appreciate the originality of iconic works such as The Thinker 1881 and The Three Shades 1886 as well as make fresh discoveries that reveal how the artist transformed modern sculpture.

Although Rodin is best known for his bronze and marble sculptures, he personally only worked as a modeller, capturing movement, emotion, light and volume in pliable materials such as clay which were then cast in plaster. The Making of Rodin is the first show to focus in-depth on Rodin’s use of plaster, taking inspiration from the artist’s landmark self-organised exhibition at the Pavillon de l’Alma in 1900. It was here that Rodin made the unconventional decision to display his life’s work almost entirely in plaster, emphasising the crucial role the medium played in his career. Many of the star exhibits of 1900 such as the monumental casts of Balzac 1898 or La Meditation 1896 will be shown at Tate Modern in a rare reunion.

The exhibition will also evoke the atmosphere of the Pavillon de l’Alma, which in turn had riffed on an imaginary vision of the artist’s studio. Rather than show a workshop populated by models, carvers, casters, photographers and founders who turned Rodin’s creations and vision into traditional commercial sculptures, it foregrounded modelling and the notion of the ‘artist’s hand’ as the central drivers for Rodin’s work. A stockpile of plaster body parts on loan from the Musée Rodin will reveal how he continually experimented with fragmentation, repetition and joining existing parts in unconventional ways. Individually crafted heads, hands, arms, legs and feet allowed him to dismantle and reassemble his works time and again in countless combinations and poses. The exhibition will explore how these experiments went on to influence some of the artist’s best-known sculptures, including the newly restored plaster for The Burghers of Calais 1889 displayed as Rodin had originally intended.

The complex dynamics of Rodin’s work with different models will be considered from the perspective of some of the extraordinary women with whom he worked, including his onetime studio assistant and collaborator Camille Claudel. Rodin strongly responded to the individual character and physicality of his models. This is especially evident in his numerous portraits of the actress Ohta Hisa (1868-1945). Busts depicting Rodin’s friend and correspondent, the German aristocrat Helene Von Nostitz née Hindenburg (1878–1944), also illustrate how he embraced visible traces of his work’s creation, believing the ‘process’ to be as significant as the finished form.

Archival images, many of which Rodin chose to display alongside his plaster works at the Pavillon de l’Alma, will show how he used photography to explore combinations of forms and analyse his sculptures from multiple viewpoints. These will be joined by a series of the artist’s watercolour drawings in which he further experimented and re-worked bodily forms.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Tate announces 2021 Exhibition Highlights

Tate have announced highlights of its programme for 2021, including solo exhibitions of Philip Guston, Petrit Halilaj, Lubaina Himid, Yayoi Kusama, Paula Rego, Auguste Rodin and Sophie Taeuber-Arp. The year will also see newly commissioned works by Heather Phillipson, Emily Speed and Anicka Yi, as well as landmark exhibitions exploring Britain’s relationship with the Caribbean and Hogarth’s depictions of 18th century life.

 

Autumn 2020

As announced last week, this autumn will see Turner’s Modern World and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye at Tate Britain, Zanele Muholi and Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern, Don McCullin at Tate Liverpool, and Haegue Yang at Tate St Ives.

In addition, Tate Modern confirmed this week that its Andy Warhol exhibition will be extended for two more months and will now close on 15 November 2020, and that Ed Ruscha’s current ARTIST ROOMS display will be extended to July 2021. Tate Britain also announced that its annual Winter Commission will be undertaken by Chila Kumari Burman, opening for Diwali on 14 November 2020.

Spring 2021

The spring season will begin at Tate Modern with a retrospective of one of America’s greatest modern painters, Philip Guston. Over a 50-year career, Guston bridged the personal and the political, the abstract and the figurative, the humorous and the tragic, creating some of the most influential paintings of the late 20th century. This will be followed by a rare chance to experience two of Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms, immersive installations that transport the viewer into the artist’s unique vision of endless reflections.

The annual Tate Britain Commission will be unveiled in March, created this year by Heather Phillipson. Coinciding with her project for the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, Phillipson’s work will transform the Duveen Galleries with a spectacular and other-worldly installation.

Summer 2021

Paula Rego, the acclaimed Portuguese-British artist of extraordinary imaginative power, will be the subject of a retrospective at Tate Britain in the summer. Rego has played a key role in redefining contemporary figurative art, particularly with her uncompromising representation of women. It will run alongside Hope. Struggle. Change: Photographing Britain and the ​World 1945-79, bringing together 300 powerful documentary photographs that tell the story of modern Britain, from conflicts and interventions abroad to migration and civil rights movements at home.

Tate Modern will celebrate two groundbreaking figures in modern art with major exhibitions. The EY Exhibition: The Making of Rodin will reveal Auguste Rodin as a radical artist, whose highly experimental works modelled in clay and plaster broke with century-long traditions and inaugurated a new age of sculpture. Sophie Taeuber-Arp will showcase the multidisciplinary work of one of the foremost abstract artists and designers of the 1920s and 30s, who challenged the boundaries between traditional crafts and modern art.

Autumn 2021

In the autumn, Anicka Yi’s Hyundai Commission for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall will continue her ongoing exploration of the links between art and science and her use of unorthodox and experimental materials. Also at Tate Modern, a theatrical exhibition by the Turner Prize winning artist Lubaina Himid will include recent work alongside highlights from across her influential career, often exploring overlooked and invisible aspects of social history and contemporary life.

Tate Britain will open two major group exhibitions exploring art’s connections to wider social and cultural history. Hogarth and Europe will show how 18th century urban life was captured by William Hogarth in London alongside his contemporaries in Paris, Amsterdam and Venice. The exhibition will bring to life a vivid world of opportunity and enlightenment as well as materialism and exploitation. Britain and the Caribbean will be a landmark group exhibition spanning half a century, celebrating artists from the Caribbean who made their home in Britain, alongside later British artists who have made work addressing Caribbean themes and heritage.

EXHIBITION DATES

Andy Warhol
Until 15 November 2020, Tate Modern

ARTIST ROOMS: Ed Ruscha
Until 18 July 2021, Tate Modern

Tate Archive is 50: A journey through the world’s largest archive of British art
12 October 2020 – Autumn 2021, Tate Britain

Tate Britain Winter Commission: Chila Kumari Burman
14 November 2020 – 31 January 2021, Tate Britain

Art Now: Cooking Sections
27 November 2020 – 28 February 2021, Tate Britain

Philip Guston
4 February – 31 May 2021, Tate Modern

Tate Britain Commission: Heather Phillipson
22 March – 10 October 2021, Tate Britain

Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirror Rooms
Spring 2021 – Spring 2022, Tate Modern

The EY Exhibition: The Making of Rodin
6 May – 10 October 2021, Tate Modern

Hope. Struggle. Change: Photographing Britain and the ​World 1945-79
12 May – 26 September 2021, Tate Britain

Paula Rego
16 June – 24 October 2021, Tate Britain

Sophie Taeuber-Arp
15 July – 17 October 2021, Tate Modern

Hyundai Commission: Anicka Yi
5 October 2021 – 9 January 2022, Tate Modern

Hogarth and Europe
3 November 2021 – 20 March 2022, Tate Britain

Lubaina Himid
24 November 2021 – 22 May 2022, Tate Modern

Britain and the Caribbean
1 December 2021 – 3 April 2022, Tate Britain

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Great London Sculptures: The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin in Victoria Tower Gardens

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors to the Houses of Parliament, often ignore the Victoria Tower Gardens nearby. The gardens offer some wonderful riverfront views and have pieces of art to admire. One of the largest and most prestigious is The Burghers of Calais, by French sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Appropriately, considering it is within the shadow of the Houses of Parliament it represents the idea of freedom from oppression. The sculpture is based on an incident during the Hundred Years War, Calais had been surrounded for a year by English soldiers under King Edward III when in 1347, six leading citizens of Calais, the Burghers, offered to die if Edward spared the rest of the town’s people.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It was this moment of heroic self-sacrifice that Rodin captures in his sculpture. In the end, an intervention by Edward’s wife, Queen Philippa pleaded on the Burghers behalf and they and the people of Calais were allowed to leave.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Rodin was commissioned to undertake this work of art in the 1880s and his original sculpture was completed in 1889 and took pride of place outside Calais town hall. Rodin later made a number of casts, this one was bought by the National Art Collection Fund in 1911 and the artist himself came to London to give advice on where the sculpture should be erected.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This particular sculpture was cast in 1908, installed in 1914 and unveiled in 1915. Over the last century, the sculpture is considered to be one of Rodin greatest works and further casts have been installed in museums and art galleries all over the world.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review : Rodin and the art of ancient Greece at the British Museum – 26th April to 29th July 2018

Auguste Rodin is considered one of the greatest sculptors of the modern era and the British Museum presents an exhibition entitled Rodin and the art of ancient Greece which explores in detail the influence of the art of antiquity, particularly that of ancient Greece on the artist. The exhibition explores the influence on Rodin by the works of the fifth-century BC sculptor Pheidias who is known as the artist who conceived the Parthenon sculptures and the role of the British Museum in Rodin’s later works.

The exhibition will feature over 80 works in marble, bronze and plaster, alongside some of Rodin’s sketches. By showing Rodin’s work alongside the Parthenon sculptures that inspired him, the exhibition hopes to illustrate the connection between the two and provide new insights into the sculptures of the artist.

The exhibition design takes inspiration from Rodin’s home and studio in Meudon outside Paris, and is surprisingly open and airy with the Sainsbury Exhibitions Gallery filled with natural light at both ends of the space for the first time since it opened in 2014. The unusual open plan design allows visitors to walk around many of the works and view from a variety of angles.  

The exhibition opens with a direct comparison between Rodin and Greek sculpture with one of Rodin’s famous work The Kiss (1882), next to the tangled limbs of two female goddesses, originally on the East Pediment of the Parthenon. This copy of The Kiss is a plaster cast of the first marble example and it became the version which Rodin would display in exhibitions and from which others were copied.

Over his life Rodin built up a collection of over 6,000 antiquities and in 1900 he built a museum at Meudon to house his growing collection. His love of the sculptures of ancient Greece led him to visit the Louvre and the British Museum to study the Parthenon sculptures.

Walking around the exhibition it is often difficult to distinguish between Rodin’s work and the Greek sculptures because Rodin often used chop off the heads and limbs from his own sculptures in order to make them more like the archaeological ruins of the past.

If there are similarities, there are also differences, Rodin never sculpted copies of the Parthenon figures instead he used them as inspiration for his own original works. Some of Rodin’s most famous works are featured including The Thinker, The Age of Bronze, The Burghers of Calais, The Walking Man, The Man with the Broken Nose and many more. One of the more unusual sculptures is Pallas (Athena) which has the Parthenon balanced on the woman’s head.

The inclusion of some of the Parthenon Sculptures is fascinating not only in comparison of Rodin’s work but allowing visitors to view the sculptures in detail. When you look closely it is often the fluidity of movement and flowing lines that are the most impressive and one can understand the artist’s fascination with them.

This intriguing exhibition explores how Rodin’s interest in Greek Sculpture bought him to the British Museum many times and created a connection with the sculptures and the museum that forms the basis of the show.

In some ways, it is strange that these connections are not more widely known, however many people have been more interested to present Rodin as a modern sculptor rather that seeing his connections to the more classical period. This exhibition provides an unusual and unique opportunity to view  Rodin’s artistic work from new angles, the Parthenon Sculptures connected Rodin to the past but enabled him to create original works that looked to the future.

Visiting London Guide Rating –  Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review : Sargent , Portraits of Artists and Friends at the National Portrait Gallery – 12th Feb to 25 May 2015

DSCN0775

John Singer Sargent (1856-1925) was considered one of the greatest portrait painters of his generation. Widely acclaimed in his time,  he  had a wide range of acquaintances including some of the leading artists, writers, actors and musicians of the time. He was a prolific painter whose formal portraits, commissioned by wealthy patrons often contrasted with the more intimate and experimental portraits of his friends and contemporaries which included Auguste Rodin, Claude Monet and Robert Louis Stevenson.

DSCN0737
This major exhibition of over seventy portraits spans Sargent’s time in London, Paris, Boston and New York as well as his travels in the Italian and English countryside. Important loans from galleries and private collections in Europe and America make this an opportunity to discover the artist’s most daring, personal and distinctive portraits.

Although Sargent’s parents were American, he was bought up and spent his formative years travelling around Europe, when he decided to study painting, he was accepted by the prestigious École des Beaux Arts in 1874 and developed his skills under the teaching of Carolus-Duran who was a respected French portraitist. There is a portrait of  Carolus-Duran by Sargent in the exhibition.

DSCN0752

Sargent was soon accepted into the Paris art world and became friendly with a number of French artists and fellow expatriates including Monet and Rodin. His early works led people to believe he was at the start of a glittering career, however his portrait of Madame X (Madame Pierre Gautreau) caused a scandal at the Paris Salon of 1884.

DSCN0715

The scandal was such that Sargeant decided to move to London for a while and spent a great deal of time in the next two years travelling between the London and Paris.
In one of his forays to England he travelled and stayed in  the Anglo-American colony of artists and writers in the Cotswold village of Broadway. It was at this time that he painted the widely acclaimed Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose. In the same period he travelled  to Bournemouth  and painted a portrait of writer Robert Louis Stevenson. The exhibition shows  two of Sargent’s striking portraits of Stevenson in which he captures the tall languid writer in a couple of informal poses.

DSCN0717
Although spending most of his life in Europe, Sargent never gave up his American citizenship and from the 1890s, he built up a considerable reputation and was in demand  for portraits . It was in 1890 that Sargent painted the flamboyant Spanish dancer Carmencita, who had entranced New York audiences with her flamenco dancing.

DSCN0744

When Sargent was back  in England he immersed himself  in the cultural life of London, and became a  friend to many artists, writers and musicians.  A talented musician himself, he promoted the careers of many musicians, among them the French composer Gabriel Faure.

DSCN0759

His striking  portrait of Ellen Terry as Lady Macbeth in full theatrical pose was an illustration of his interest in the theatrical profession .

DSCN0732
After 1900, Sargent cut back considerable on his portrait commissions and  turned to landscape painting, travelling to the Alps, Venice and southern Europe.  He often travelled with fellow artists and often painted them as  they painted the natural world around them.

This major exhibition charts the career of  John Singer Sargent  and  illustrates the differences between his more formal portraits and the more experimental portraits of artists and friends.

Even his detractors could not deny Sargent’s technical brilliance, but suggested  his more formal portraits lacked insight into the sitters character. By contrast his less formal portraits often sparkled with colour and vitality.  These two sides of Sargent’s career is one of the main themes of the exhibition and provides some reasons why in the first part of the 20th century he seemed to fall out of favour being considered old fashioned.

He also seemed to suffer because he did not seem to belong into any particular school , for the English critics some of his painting were impressionistic, whilst the French critics considered him, not impressionistic enough.

The exhibition shows that these concerns blinded people to the fact that his paintings covered a wide range of styles and subject matter.  Since the 1960s, there has been a resurgence of interest in Sargent and his talent as a portrait painter  fully recognised. The exhibition offers visitors the chance to see some of his major works and understand his important friendships and relationships with some of the major writers, artists and musicians of his time.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like more information or book tickets, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

Tickets without donation
Full price £14.50
Concessions £13.00

Family Tickets
One adult or concession and up to four children (aged 12–18) £22.50
Two adults or concessions and up to four children (aged 12–18) £31.50

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here