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Exhibition Review: Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery – 26th September 2018 to 6th January 2019


The Hayward Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled Space Shifters which features artworks by 20 leading international artists that challenges the visitor’s sense of space and perception. Many works in the exhibition interact directly with the Gallery’s distinctive architecture using  reflective or translucent materials like glass, resin and mirror.

The exhibition presents a range of historical and contemporary sculptures, as well as immersive, site-specific installations. It also premieres several major new commissions.  Participating artists include: Leonor Antunes, Larry Bell, Fred Eversley, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jeppe Hein, Roni Horn, Robert Irwin, Ann Veronica Janssens, Anish Kapoor, Yayoi Kusama, Alicja Kwade, John McCracken, Josiah McElheny, Helen Pashgian, Charlotte Posenenske, Fred Sandback, Monika Sosnowska, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané,DeWain Valentine, and Richard Wilson.

The earliest works in this group show are often associated with the ‘Light and Space’ movement which originated in the mid-1960s in the Los Angeles area. At this time, a number of the American artists included in the exhibition began experimenting with unconventional materials and innovative fabrication processes.  Helen Pashgian contributes several epoxy and acrylic spheres and a series of large acrylic columns which use varying degrees of transparency and light to generate optical effects.

Many of the works created by these artists allow viewers to both see into as well as through the material of a solid sculpture. Robert Irwin’s work Untitled (Acrylic Column), 1969–2011 is a large clear acrylic column that rises over 4.5 metres in the Hayward’s upper gallery.

Using an innovative spinning casting process, Fred Eversley creates vivid coloured lenses through which viewers can explore the world in many different hues.

Larry Bell is represented in the exhibition by his first large-scale installation Standing Walls (1969/2016). Viewers can enter to experience its different reflections and effects.

Contemporary artist Ann Veronica Janssens demonstrate the diversity of perceptual effects using glass by exploring colour in radically different ways. Janssens bonds reflective film between sheets of smashed glass for her Magic Mirrors.

In the first gallery,  Jeppe Hein’s 360° Illusion V, 2018, a huge rotating mirror sculpture constantly changes the reflections of the surrounding architecture and viewers.

Other reflective highlights of the exhibition include: Yayoi Kusama’s renowned Narcissus Garden (1966-), a landscape of hundreds of large stainless steel spheres.

Using the outside light, Sky Mirror, Blue (2016) by Anish Kapoor captures a piece of the sky and reflects it onto  one of the Hayward Gallery’s sculpture courts.

Alicja Kwade’s WeltenLinie (2017) is shown for the first time since its premiere at the last Venice Biennale. This installation encourages the viewer to walk around and through its structure of frames, as objects seem to change appearance.

Occupying an entire upper gallery, Richard Wilson recreates his monumental installation 20:50 (1987). Thousands of litres of recycled oil form a waist-high horizon that surrounds the viewer as they proceed down a gangway.

Leonor Antunes  has created a piece that cascades downward from one of the new Hayward Gallery ceiling full of  brass shapes.

And while wandering through the galleries, visitors encounter Josiah McElheny’s Interactions of the Abstract Body (2012) which keeps perceptions shifting – trained dancers wearing mirrored wooden costumes interact with visitors as well as other artworks in a continuously changing performance.

This enjoyable and entertaining exhibition uses the Hayward Gallery’s unique architectural features to the full with works that fill the spaces with a variety of reflective effects. Visitors can engage with the works to create a number of perceptual effects to create an ever-changing landscape. The exhibition illustrates the fascination and skill of artists to find different ways of looking at the world around us, sometimes the changes are subtle whilst others can be dramatic and disorientate the viewer. The exhibition is a fitting conclusion to events celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Hayward Gallery and provides evidence that the Hayward Gallery often offers a different experience to many of the other galleries in London

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery – 26th September 2018 to 6th January 2019

Hayward Gallery’s Autumn exhibition Space Shifters features artworks by 20 leading international artists that alter or disrupt the visitor’s sense of space and re-orient their perception of their surroundings in ways that are subtle yet dramatic. The works in the exhibition focus the attention of the viewer on the act of perception whilst transforming their experience of the Gallery’s distinctive architecture. Often constructed from reflective or translucent materials like glass, resin and mirror, the artworks in the show aim to elicit surprising responses that are both physiological and psychological. They also comprise an alternative history of minimalism: not a geometric, austere, serial minimalism, but one with a more alluring, elegant and playful sensibility.

Space Shifters presents a range of historical and contemporary sculptures, as well as immersive, site-specific installations. It also premieres several major new commissions.  Participating artists include: Leonor Antunes, Larry Bell, Fred Eversley, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jeppe Hein, Roni Horn, Robert Irwin, Ann Veronica Janssens, Anish Kapoor, Yayoi Kusama, Alicja Kwade, John McCracken, Josiah McElheny, Helen Pashgian, Charlotte Posenenske, Fred Sandback, Monika Sosnowska, Daniel Steegmann Mangrané,DeWain Valentine, and Richard Wilson.

The earliest works in this group show are often associated with the ‘Light and Space’ movement which originated in the mid-1960s in the Los Angeles area. At this time, a number of the American artists included in the exhibition were experimenting with unconventional materials and innovative fabrication processes. One of the few female artists associated with Light and Space, Helen Pashgian contributes several epoxy and acrylic spheres and a series of large acrylic columns which use varying degrees of transparency and light to generate optical effects.

Many of the works created by these artists allow viewers to both see into as well as through the material of a solid sculpture. Robert Irwin’s work Untitled (Acrylic Column), 1969–2011 is a monumental and majestic clear acrylic column that rises over 4.5 metres in the Hayward’s upper gallery, yet is almost imperceptible, save for its refractive properties. Using an innovative spinning casting process, Fred Eversley creates sensuous coloured lenses through which viewers can witness the world anew.

Larry Bell, who explores similar concerns through the medium of glass, is represented in the exhibition by his first large-scale installation Standing Walls (1969/2016). Viewers can enter to experience its compounding reflections and effects whilst seeing themselves within the sculpture. Contemporary artists Ann Veronica Janssens and Roni Horn demonstrate the diversity of perceptual effects using glass by exploring colour in radically different ways. Janssens bonds reflective film between sheets of smashed glass that give her Magic Mirrors a dynamic, iridescent shine, while Horn’s large cast-glass lozenge Untitled (“Everything was sleeping as if the universe were a mistake.”), 2012–13 seems to contain an uncanny depth and liquidity.

In Space Shifters, several artists ponder the notion of reflection and that its definition holds a double meaning: the physical mirroring of an object and the contemplative act. The most dramatic example of this is Jeppe Hein’s 360° Illusion V, 2018, a huge rotating mirror sculpture that presides over the first gallery. This work reflects the surrounding architecture as well as groups of viewers, drawing them in with simultaneous inversions. Other reflective highlights of the exhibition include: Yayoi Kusama’s renowned Narcissus Garden (1966-), a landscape of hundreds of stainless steel spheres. Engaging the external environment, Sky Mirror, Blue (2016) by Anish Kapoor dramatically shifts a portion of the sky onto one of the Hayward Gallery’s distinctive sculpture courts.

Alicja Kwade’s WeltenLinie (2017) is shown for the first time since its premiere at the last Venice Biennale. This installation encourages the viewer to walk around and through its structure of frames, as objects seem to change appearance – a greyish rock turns to rusted metal, while a wooden tree trunk becomes a gleaming silver impression of itself.

Occupying an entire upper gallery, Richard Wilson recreates his monumental installation 20:50 (1987). Thousands of litres of recycled oil form a waist-high horizon that surrounds the viewer as they proceed down a gangway spliced through the inky liquid. The artwork’s glossy surface will reflect the Hayward Gallery’s new pyramid roof lights and the open sky beyond.

Several new commissions in the exhibition play off of the unique brutalist architecture of the Hayward Gallery building, taking on some of its more transitional spaces like the staircases and corridors. Daniel Steegmann Mangrané is inspired by the shape of the poured concrete stairwells and he has created, especially for this exhibition, curtains that echo their curves. Creating an equally delicate piece that cascades downward from one of the new Hayward Gallery ceiling coffers, Leonor Antunes conjures a light-filled volume of brass shapes. And while wandering through the galleries, visitors will encounter Josiah McElheny’s Interactions of the Abstract Body (2012) which keeps perceptions shifting – trained dancers wearing mirrored wooden costumes interact with visitors as well as other artworks in a continuous performance.

With spatial perception at its centre, Space Shifters is a fitting conclusion to the Hayward Gallery’s 50th anniversary, highlighting and making the most of some of the renovated building’s architectural features.

For more information , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : The 250th Summer Exhibition at the Royal Academy – 12th June to 19th August 2018

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is one of the great English Art traditions, it is the world’s oldest open-submission exhibition being established in 1768 whose long line of exhibitors reads like a Who’s Who of British Art. Some of the earliest exhibitors included the likes of Reynolds, Constable and Turner, however the exhibition prides itself that it offers a snapshot of contemporary art.

This year, the Royal Academy celebrates its 250th Summer Exhibition, and to mark this momentous occasion, the exhibition is co-ordinated by Grayson Perry RA.  Perry, alongside the Summer Exhibition Committee, celebrate the democracy of the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show by exhibiting a range of art being made in this moment in time with the theme of ‘Art Made Now’.  For the first time, the Summer Exhibition spreads across the new RA and the streets of Bond Street, Piccadilly, Regent Street and Regent Street St. James’s with Royal Academicians Rose Wylie, Grayson Perry, Cornelia Parker and Joe Tilson decorating the streets with an installation of over 200 flags.

Some of the highlights of the exhibition include the Anish Kapoor’s monumental sculpture Symphony for a Beloved Daughter, which is installed in the Royal Academy’s Annenberg Courtyard.

In the Main Galleries, David Hockney shows two vast new works which combine photographs taken from many view-points into a single monumental image. 

The Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos show an enormous textile body Royal Valkyrie in the Central Hall.

Further artists exhibiting include Mona Hatoum, Antony Gormley, Michael Landy, Richard Long, Bob and Roberta Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Jane and Louise Wilson, Bruce Nauman and Ed Ruscha.

Piers Gough curates the Architecture Gallery which features models of varying sizes and mediums.

This year, the exhibition features over 1,300 works on show, unlike many major exhibitions, many of the works in the exhibition will be on sale.

Each room offers a kaleidoscope of colour and images in a range of media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

The Summer Exhibition offers a platform for emerging and established artists and architects to showcase their work in front of a large international audience. The Summer Exhibition also plays a practical role in training young artists, it raises funds to finance the current students of the RA Schools. The RA Schools is the longest established art school in the UK and offers the only free three-year postgraduate programme in Europe.

This fascinating exhibition has a large number of wonderfully eclectic works on display, there is really something for everyone regardless of your particular artistic taste. The Summer Exhibition is one of the highlights of the art world’s summer and attracts a wide range of visitors. It also offers a rare opportunity to buy works from well-known and not so well-known artists with prices ranging from a few hundred to over a hundred thousand pounds.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Tristan and Isolde at the London Coliseum – 9th June to 9th July 2016

Anthony Minghell's Madam Butterfly Returns to the English National Opera. London 14th May 2016

ENO’s first new production of Tristan and Isolde since 1996 is directed by acclaimed director Daniel Kramer, with designs from Anish Kapoor, one of the most influential sculptors of his generation.

One of Wagner’s most powerful opera’s is one of the highlights of ENO’s 2015/16 Season, the epic drama will be told on a grand scale. In a story of passion and separation, can Princess Isolde and her lover Tristan find true love.

The monumental score is conducted by former ENO Music Director Edward Gardner and the cast is led by Wagnerian Heldentenor Stuart Skelton as Tristan, with American soprano Heidi Melton as Isolde.

Running Time

5hrs 00mins

Language

Sung in English, with surtitles projected above the stage

If you would like more information or buy tickets, visit the ENO website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Review – Akram Khan Company : Kaash at Sadler’s Wells – 3rd March 2016

Akram Khan - Kaash (cred. Louis Fernandez) (16)

Akram Khan – Kaash (photo Louis Fernandez)

There was a sense of anticipation at Sadler’s Wells for the revival of Akram Khan’s Kaash which premiered in 2002 to critical acclaim. Kaash was his company’s first full-length work with contributions from the respective talents of Anish Kapoor and Nitin Sawhney.

Kaash (the Hindi word for “if only”) is part of Khan’s exploration of contemporary dance and the Indian classical dance form kathak and was inspired by “Hindu Gods, black holes, Indian time cycles, tablas, creation and destruction” .

The beginning of the piece involves Sung Hoon Kim walking and standing motionless in front of  a huge painting by set designer Anish Kapoor which is hung on the back of the stage. The blackness of the painting seems to illuminated by the surrounding colours to create a slightly unreal scene that seemed to bemuse the audience before they are jolted into life by the arrival of the four other dancers who appear to a pounding drumbeat score. Whilst Sung Hoon Kim still remains motionless, the four dancers launch into a frantic dance with rapid spins and arms extending and cutting through the air with hand gestures that reflect aspects of kathak dance.

Akram Khan - Kaash (cred. Louis Fernandez) (5)

Akram Khan – Kaash (photo Louis Fernandez)

Rather than following any particular narrative, the dancers are propelled around the stage in bursts of energy which allows them to attract and repel each other. The pounding soundtrack by Nitin Sawhney is an intrinsic part of the piece providing an ever moving soundscape that the dancers interpret and respond too. After the frenetic beginning, the pace changes considerably with a slow intense solo for Kim before the other dancers move into more primitive and ritualistic movements. There are moments of no background music at all in which the dancers breathing and footsteps became audible which gives some understanding of the pure physicality of the dance.

Akram Khan - Kaash (cred. Louis Fernandez) (6)

Akram Khan – Kaash (photo Louis Fernandez)

From primitive, the work moves into a more modern view of the universe, disembodied voices are heard, the dancers carry out group rhythmic movements to the chants of seeming nonsense. The stage suddenly vibrates to deafeningly loud music and pulsating lights, the black backdrop is bathed in red light to give a sinister aspect to the whole experience. The dancers return to the original movements of rapid turns and flailing arms but now it is the turn of the four dancers to stand motionless before the black void and it is left to Kim to make a series of slow intricate movements before darkness descends.

Akram Khan - Kaash (cred. Louis Fernandez) (8)

Akram Khan – Kaash (photo Louis Fernandez)

Kaash is a wildly ambitious abstract work that places enormous responsibility on the dancers, Kristina Alleyne, Sadé Alleyne, Sarah Cerneaux, Nicola Monaco and Sung Hoon Kim who deserve considerable credit for maintaining the necessary skills and intensity over the period of the show. The simple black costumes by Kimie Nakano with swirling skirts of black fabric accentuated the athletic physicality of the dancers with elements that were reminiscent of kathak dance costumes.

Although this updated version is slightly different from the 2002 version, the audience enthusiastic reaction suggests it will be positively received and provides a reminder of the remarkable talent and ambition of Akram Khan, Anish Kapoor and Nitin Sawhney who well over a decade ago began to seek to explore some of the secrets of the universe within an abstract dance form.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Sadler’s Wells website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Akram Khan Company : Kaash at Sadler’s Wells – 3rd to 5th March 2016

kaash

14 years ago, Akram Khan teamed up with the considerable talents of Anish Kapoor and Nitin Sawhney to present Kaash, his company’s first full-length work.

kash2

“Hindu Gods, black holes, Indian time cycles, tablas, creation and destruction” were the starting points for this work. Kaash (the Hindi word for “if only”) accentuated Khan’s quest to build bridges between the worlds of contemporary dance and the Indian classical dance form kathak.

This long-awaited revival from Sadler’s Wells Associate Artist Akram Khan, one of the most acclaimed dance makers working today, will be performed by an acclaimed cast of dancers who will help to shed new light and energy on the piece.

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Sadler’s Wells website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Ai Weiwei Exhibition at the Royal Academy – 19th September to 13th December 2015

weiwei

The Royal Academy of Arts have announced that they will present a landmark exhibition of the Honorary Royal Academician, Ai Weiwei.  Ai is one of China’s leading contemporary artists, he is probably best known in the UK for his Sunflower Seeds at the Tate Modern in 2010. The Royal Academy will present the first major survey of his artistic output. The exhibition will include significant works from 1993 onwards, the date that marks Ai Weiwei’s return to China following more than a decade living in New York. Ai Weiwei will create new, site-specific installations and interventions throughout the Royal Academy’s spaces.

sunseeds

When Ai returned to China in 1993, he began to bring influences from the East and West into his work, he also looked to the past  traditions and methods to produce artworks which include Table and Pillar, 2002, from his Furniture series, and Coloured Vases, 2015.

Sculptures such as Surveillance Camera, 2010 and Video Camera, 2010, examines modern technology and  a new artwork, Remains, 2015, will  be included in the exhibition. This work made in porcelain, replicates in meticulous detail a group of bones that were recently excavated at a site of a labour camp that operated under Chairman Mao in the 1950s.

One of the key installations within the exhibition will be Straight, 2008-12, part of the body of work related to the Sichuan earthquake of 2008. Fabricated from ninety tonnes of bent and twisted rebar (the steel rods used in the construction of reinforced concrete buildings), collected by the artist and straightened by hand, it is a  monument to the victims of the earthquake.

Ai was elected an Honorary Member of the Royal Academy of Arts in May 2011. This exhibition will follow a series of exhibitions at the Royal Academy which have featured some of the most significant living artists including Anish Kapoor, David Hockney and Anselm Kiefer.

Ai Weiwei has not been able to leave China since 2011 when his passport was confiscated. However the exhibition has been developed in close collaboration with Ai,  The artist has virtually navigated the spaces from his studio in Beijing, through video footage of the galleries and architectural plans. The curators have also made regular visits to his studio.

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

 Exhibition

                 19 September –  13 December 2015

                   10am – 6pm daily (last admission 5.30pm)

                        Fridays until 10pm (last admission 9.30pm)

Tickets

£17.60 full price (£16 without Gift Aid donation); concessions available; children under 16 and Friends of the RA go free.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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