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RHS London Botanical Art Show at The RHS Lindley Hall – 26th and 27th February 2016

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The RHS Lindley Hall will host the RHS London Botanical Art Show from 26-27 February. This show focuses entirely on botanical art, promoting the world-class Lindley Library collection and championing the skills of some of the world’s best botanical artists through a display of unseen work.  In its seventh year, the show celebrates the beauty, technical artistry and scientific importance of botanical art. There is also an element of competition with artists from Thailand, Japan, Australia and Turkey joining British artists, all hoping to win a coveted Gold Medal. Last year, Japanese artists at the show won four of the six gold medals. There are works in graphite, watercolour and pencil, gouache and acrylic, with subjects ranging from trees and fruit to vegetables and wild plants.

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Interest in botanical art is increasing around the world, part of this interest is that botanical art is not necessarily the exact reproduction of the plant or flower. The finished painting is often a composite of many elements that allows the artist to show their creativity. It is this creativity that allows an attention to details that would get lost in a photograph.

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The show is an opportunity for visitors to talk to the artists about their work and in some cases, purchase works and prints directly from the artist

There will also be the opportunity for visitors to buy a variety of art products and talk to representatives from florilegia societies and botanical art and illustration societies about their work and courses.

What’s on

Meet the artists working in our pop-up studio

Learn about their processes, watch them work, gain tips and advice

Buy a variety of art products

For more information or to book tickets, visit the RHS website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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RHS London Early Spring Plant Fair at the RHS Lawrence Hall – 16th and 17th February 2016

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It is always a sign that Spring may be just around the corner when the RHS start the 2016 gardening season with a show that features an welcoming mix of fresh winter colour and early-flowering plants.

The RHS London Early Spring Plant Fair which will be held at the RHS Lawrence Hall on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 16th and 17th February 2016  will be the first RHS show of the year, Formerly the RHS London Plant and Potato Fair, this show will help you welcome in the new growing season and offer a wealth of inspiration to help you get your horticultural plans in place.

For the first time, the RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2016, will be previewed at an exclusive exhibition at Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Horticultural Halls, Westminster, on 16–17 February.

The Chelsea Preview, in the Lindley Hall, will include images and design sketches and items that have inspired gardens featuring in the world’s most famous flower show this May.

Visitors will have the chance to meet and hear from the likes of the internationally acclaimed garden designer Hay Joung Hwang and multi-RHS award winning designers such as Sarah Eberle and Juliet Sargeant through live Q&A sessions held throughout both days of the show.

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What’s on

Among a number of features at the fair, you will find:

Advice from a variety of experts

Colourful early-season plants from some of the UK’s best nurserymen and growers

An abundance of bulbs and plants to buy

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The show has not forgot the ‘honest spud’, find out about the different varieties of potato available, and there will be a variety of seed potatoes and onion sets to buy.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the RHS website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

A Short Guide to The Regent’s Park

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The Regent’s Park (including Primrose Hill) covers 197 hectares and like most of the other Royal Parks, Regent’s Park was part of the large area of land appropriated by Henry VIII. Marylebone Park, as the area was known, remained a royal domain until 1646. After the Civil War, the land was leased by the crown to tenant farmers until 1811 when the rapidly developing London made the area attractive to building.

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John Nash, architect to the crown and friend of the Prince Regent developed a masterplan for Regent’s Park which included a huge circle with a lake, a canal and the new royal residence inside. There was also a plan for 56 villas in the park and a series of grand Regency terraces around it.

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Although the masterplan was never completed, many elements of Nash’s scheme survived with eight villa’s and a series of grand Regency terraces built. The park was only used originally by the residents of the villas and terraces until 1835, when the east side the park was open to the public.

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The park was little changed for 150 years until formal Rose beds were developed in Queen Mary’s Gardens in 1930s.

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Running through the northern end of the park is the Regent’s Canal and it borders on London Zoo, but much of the park is open parkland with a wide range of facilities including gardens, a lake with a boating area, sports pitches, and children’s playgrounds.

See Video Review here

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to Green Park

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The Green Park covers 40 acres and links St James’s Park and Hyde Park, the park has no buildings but is full of mature trees and grassland. It is a popular route for those visiting Buckingham Palace from the Green Park underground station which is located at the edge of the park.

The Green Park was first recorded in 1554 as the place where a rebellion took place against the marriage of Mary I to Philip II of Spain. It was also a famous duelling site until 1667 when Charles II bought an extra 40 acres and it became known as upper St James’s Park.

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Now a peaceful area, The Green Park in the 17th and 18th century was the scene of a number of festivities, two vast ‘temples’ called the Temple of Peace and the Temple of Concord were located in the park but were destroyed during firework displays in 1749 and 1814. The park was enclosed by Charles II in 1668 and stocked with deer, the King also built one of the first ice houses in Britain here.

In the 18th century, The Green Park became a favourite place for Queen Caroline, the wife of George II. She built a reservoir called the Queen’s Basin, a library and the Queen’s Walk, which became a fashionable path.

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In the 1820s, John Nash re-landscaped the park and The Wellington Arch was built at the end of Constitution Hill to mark the point where Green Park ended and Hyde Park began. Eventually all the buildings that were located in the park were demolished.

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The park has a number of memorials to those who served and died in the two world wars.

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

A Short Guide to Hyde Park

Hyde Park is one of London’s largest parks and covers over 350 acres, the park has been the location of a large number of events over the past 500 years and is closely associated with the British monarchy.

It was King Henry VIII who seized Hyde Park from the monks of Westminster Abbey in 1536 and turned the park into a large hunting park where he organised royal hunts to entertain ambassadors and dignitaries. This hunting tradition was continued with Queen Elizabeth I and the park changed little until 1625 when Charles l became king. He opened the park to the general public in 1637 and it became a fashionable place to visit. When Charles I was executed , parliamentary troops built forts in the park to defend the city of Westminster from royalist attacks.

After the restoration of the monarchy, King Charles II turned Hyde park into a royal park when he restocked the park with deer, however there were greater changes when William and Mary became king and queen in 1689. They bought Nottingham House and renamed it Kensington Palace and made it their main home in London.

It was William III who created a processional route through Hyde Park lit by 300 oil lamps and became the first road in England to be lit at night. The road was called route de roi or King’s Road but the name became corrupted to Rotten Row.

Other striking features in Hyde Park were developed in the 18th century by Queen Caroline. In 1728, she took 300 acres from Hyde Park to form Kensington Gardens, she then had made a large lake called the Serpentine by damming the Westbourne Stream. Over the next 100 years, the park was largely unchanged until King George IV in the 1820s decided to create a monumental entrance at Hyde Park Corner. It comprised the Triumphal Screen which you see today and the Wellington Arch, which was later moved to the middle of roundabout at Hyde Park Corner.

One of the remarkable structures in the 19th century was the Crystal Palace which was built-in 1851 alongside Rotten Row to house the Great Exhibition.

The park become a traditional location for mass demonstrations which have included the Chartists and the suffragettes, it is a tradition that continues up to the present day. Political debate is still keenly undertaken at Hyde Park’s Speakers’ Corner which has acquired an international reputation for its tolerance of free speech developed from 19th century protest movements.

In the late 20th and early 21st centuries Hyde Park has been the venue for Rock and Pop concerts including the Rolling Stones and Queen. It is the location of British Summer Time Hyde Park concerts since 2013 and the park is also the venue for the Proms in the Park concerts. Since 2007, Hyde Park has hosted “Winter Wonderland”, London’s premiere winter attraction featuring fun fair rides , markets, an ice rink, and bars, restaurants, and cafes.The park also presents a number of sporting events over the year including ITU World Triathlon and Cycling.

The park also offers various recreational activities including open water swimming, boating, cycling, tennis and horse riding. There are plenty of food and drink options with cafes and refreshment points that offer coffee, ice cream, snacks & freshly made sandwiches. They are available in various locations around Hyde Park including: Serpentine Road, the playground and Hyde Park Corner.

Walking around the park is a large number of sculptures and statues including the Memorial to Diana, Princess of Wales which was opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 2004.

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

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Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

On Saturday 5 April 2014 , the Park opened to the public for the first time, however we decided to wait for a few weeks to consider  London’s newest large Park.
Unlike many of London’s parks, the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park is dominated by the stadiums and the 114.5m tall ArcelorMittal Orbit which form part of the legacy  of the 2012 Olympics.

If you walking into the park from Stratford and the Westfield Shopping centre, the first Arena is the Aquatics centre which is now open to the public.

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Walking past the Aquatic Centre, the true scale of the Orbit is gradually exposed, at 114.5m tall  with two spacious viewing platforms at 76 and 80 metres high, visitors can see over 20 miles across London and newly installed interactive technology that will enable guests to get close up to the wonderful views.

Tickets are already on sale – children £7, adults £15, family of four £40 (two adults and two children).  DSCN1877

However away from the impressive buildings is the landscaped gardens that provide areas of peace and quiet around the site.

When fully open the 560 acre site will include 4000 new trees, 6.5 km of waterways, 15 acres of woods, hedgerows, wildlife habitats.

Whilst still considering that the Park is work in progress, there is still more than enough to offer a taste of the finished article.

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One of the highlights of the park is the waterways that wind their way all through the park.

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There is plenty of child based facilities including an adventure playground  and a climbing wall.

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Over the next few months and the next few years there are a high number of high profile events  at the various arena’s and the park will certainly be a pleasant place to visit. But the opening of the Lea Valley Velo Park will take the park onto a different level for facilities.

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Lee Valley VeloPark is the first place in the world where you can take part in Track cycling, road racing, BMX or mountain biking in one place.

Centred on the iconic, award-winning, 6,000-seat velodrome, , Lee Valley VeloPark also has a brand new one-mile, floodlit road cycle circuit, the remodelled and floodlit Olympic BMX track and 8km of mountain bike trails.

 For many London visitors, the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park will eventually become a must visit, but there is more than enough to interest anyone who wishes to see one of the London’s newest attractions in its infancy.

See Video Review here

For more information, visit the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to St James’s Park

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St James’s Park

St James’s Park is the oldest Royal Park in London, The park was originally a piece of marshland, then in the 13th century a leper hospital was built. It was after the hospital dedicated to St James the Less that the park was named, In 1532 Henry VIII acquired the land and turned it into a deer park and then built St James’s Palace. Subsequent Kings and Queens made minor changes until Charles the II redesigned the park and opened it to the public. Charles  entertained his mistress Nell Gwynne in the park and for a while the park had a reputation as a sordid sexual playground. This was captured in the Earl of Rochester’s sexually explicit poem ‘A Ramble in St. James’s Park.’

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Horse Guards Parade which is still part of St James’s Park was created in the 18th century by filling in the end of a canal and was generally used for parades. In the 19th century John Nash redesigned the park and transformed the canal into a lake, birds were added to the lake in 1837 and a cottage built for the Birdkeeper.

St James Park is unique because it is surrounded by three palaces, The Palace of Westminster, St James’s Palace and Buckingham Palace.

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Another unusual aspect of the park is the Pelicans, they were first introduced to the park in 1664 as a gift from the Russian Ambassador, there are currently six pelicans in the park.

For more information, visit the Royal Parks website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here