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Review: Freud Museum in London

The Freud Museum in London is a museum dedicated to Sigmund Freud and is located in the house where Freud lived with his family during the last year of his life. The house was built in 1920 in the leafy suburbs of Hampstead.

It was in 1938, when Freud escaped the Nazi annexation of Austria and came to London via Paris, and stayed for a short while at Elsworthy Road before moving to 20 Maresfield Gardens, where the museum is situated. The Freuds moved many of their furniture and household effects to London. There are Biedermeier chests, tables and cupboards, and a collection of 18th century and 19th century Austrian painted country furniture.

The museum owns Freud’s collection of Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Oriental antiquities, and his personal library.

The highlight of the museum is Freud’s psychoanalytic couch, which had been given to him by one of his patients in 1890. Freud continued his work in London and maintained his practice in this home and used the couch when he saw a number of his patients for analysis.

Another couch in the study is where Freud died at Maresfield Gardens.

The ground floor of the museum houses Freud’s study, library, hall and the dining room. The study and library were preserved by Anna Freud after her father’s death. The bookshelf behind Freud’s desk contains some of his favourite authors such as Goethe, Shakespeare, Heine, Multatuli and Anatole France. The library contains various pictures hung as Freud arranged them; these include ‘Oedipus and the Riddle of the Sphinx’ and ‘The Lesson of Dr Charcot’ plus a number of photographs.

The small museum shop is on ground floor which leads into the quiet and tranquil garden where you can admire the house and the surroundings.

After Freud died, the house remained in his family until his youngest daughter Anna Freud, who became a pioneer of child therapy, died in 1982. It was Anna Freud’s wish that after her death that the house would be converted into a museum. The museum was opened to the public in 1986.

The first floor of the museum has Anna Freud’s room which includes items from her life, a video room, and exhibition room which hosts contemporary art and Freud-themed exhibitions.

Although the museum through its history and collections pays tribute to the work of Sigmund and Anna Freud, it encourages debate in a number of areas with an extensive events, conferences, outreach and education programmes.

Psychoanalysis was one of the major psychological breakthroughs of the 20th century, and even critics would have to concede that Sigmund Freud was one of the most important thinkers of the period.

This fascinating and attractive museum provides some insights into the work of Sigmund and Anna Freud, the quiet suburban house and garden is a perfect place to explore their ideas which questioned how ‘civilised’ we really are ? Freud’s famous and iconic psychoanalytic couch is the highlight of a collection that would appeal to wide range of people who perhaps would like to find out more about Freud and his ideas.

Address

Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens,
London NW3 5SX

Nearest Tube

Finchley Road
(Metropolitan and Jubilee lines)
5 minute walk

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Freud museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review: Bow Street Police Museum in London

With many small museums facing an uncertain future, it is with some delight that we can report a new museum opening that explores one of London’s most famous police stations near to Covent Garden. Bow Street Police Station was one of London’s first police stations and has become the country’s newest independent museum. Bow Street Police Museum sits inside no. 28 Bow Street, home of Bow Street Police Station and Magistrates’ Court for over a century. The ground floor cells and offices have been turned into galleries, telling the story of the Bow Street Runners, the country’s first organised force, and how the Metropolitan Police officers who walked the streets of Covent Garden became an important part of the area.

Bow Street Police Museum is based within the new NoMad London Hotel, which now occupies the entire newly-restored building. The Museum will operate as an independent charity supported initially by the owners of the building, the Sydell Group, but eventually will becoming self-sufficient.

The Museum tells many of the stories of investigations, arrests and justice from 18th century crime fighting to the moment the police station closed its doors in 1992, followed by the court in 2006. The museum explores Bow Street’s unique role in police, law and social history and the workings of the first Metropolitan Police station. And as well as telling the stories of the historic, sometimes infamous, trials heard at Bow Street Magistrates’ Court, the Museum also considers aspects of police history, modern policing and social justice.

Among the collections to be displayed will be the original dock from Court no. 2;

early equipment used by the Bow Street Runners on patrol, including an original cutlass, a specially-made replica Runners uniform (featuring blue double-breasted coat, blue trousers, black felt hat, black boots and the red waistcoat that earned early officers the nickname ‘robin red breasts’);

a beautiful reproduction of a collection of sketches by court artist William Hartley;

and personal effects from former officers, including beat books, truncheons and items from their time on duty at Bow Street.

Visitors can also spend time in ‘the tank’, the large cell that was often the destination for men arrested for drunken behaviour in public.

Covent Garden was a thriving hub and market when in 1881, a new police station and courthouse opened in Covent Garden. For the next century and beyond, the building and Metropolitan Police officers was a reassuring presence in the area.

People arrested by police officers at Bow Street were held overnight and tried at the Magistrates’ Court next door. The Court held a unique status that enabled it to deal with extradition proceedings, terrorist offences and cases related to the Official Secrets Act. This brought a string of notable cases to Bow Street, including IRA terrorist cases and the extradition cases against the former dictator of Chile, General Augusto Pinochet. The Museum shares some of the tales of many of those who found themselves up before Bow Street’s judges, including the Kray Twins, Dr Crippen, Oscar Wilde and suffragettes Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and Mrs Drummond.

The Museum also considers the life and times of Covent Garden, exploring how the market, theatreland, shops, bars, restaurants presented unique problems to Bow Street Police Station and the police officers.

The new museum is quite small and is well located opposite the Royal Opera House and near to Covent Garden itself. Many of the old Police stations in London have been sold and are now redeveloped therefore this is a rare opportunity to visit one of the most famous police stations in London. The museum is well designed and uses the cells to tell the various stories related to the police station and the people who worked there. Bow Street Police Museum is a welcome addition to the large number of small museums in London and once visitors start making their way to Covent Garden, hopefully it will attract plenty of visitors.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Venue: Bow Street Police Museum, 28 Bow Street, London WC2E 7AW
Admission: Entrance: £6.00; Concessions: £4.50 / £3.00; Children under 12 and carers: free
Opening: For the first six months the museum will operate three days a week Fri- Sun, 11.00 – 16.30

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Museums, Art Galleries and Attractions in London reopening May 2021

Following the latest lockdown, many of London’s attractions, art galleries and museums are reopening in May 2021. Here is a limited list but remember that restrictions may apply and visit websites for latest information.

British Library,
exhibitions reopen 17 May

British Museum,
Reopens 17 May

Charles Dickens Museum,
Reopens 19 May

Imperial War Museum,
Reopens 19 May

Museum of London,
Reopen 19 May

Museum of London Docklands,
Reopen: 19 May

National Gallery,
Reopening 17 May

National Army Museum,
Reopening 19 May

National Maritime Museum,
reopen 17 May

Natural History Museum,
Reopen 17 May

Queen’s Gallery,
reopen 17 May

Royal Academy, reopen 17 May

Tate Britain,
reopen 17 May

Tate Modern,
reopen May 17

Postal Museum,
Reopen: 20 May

Victoria and Albert Museum,
reopens 19 May

Whitechapel Gallery,
reopen 19 May

Emirates Air Line Cable Car
Open Now!

Kew Gardens
Open Now!

Climb the O2 Arena
Open Now!

Harry Potter Studio Tour
From 17 May 2021

Buckingham Palace Gardens Summer 2021!
Book Now

Tower of London
Open from 19 May

Cutty Sark & Royal Observatory Greenwich
Open from 17 May

The London Eye
From 17 May 2021

Westminster Abbey
Open from 21 May

St Paul’s Cathedral
Open from 17 May

Windsor Castle
From 17 May 2021

Churchill War Rooms
Reopening 17 May 2021

Madame Tussauds London
From 17 May 2021

Sea Life London
From 17 May 2021

The View from The Shard
From 19 May 2021

Shrek’s Adventure
From 17 May 2021

Hampton Court Palace & Gardens
Opening Soon

London Dungeon
Open from 17 May

Kensington Palace
Opening Soon

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Royal Museums Greenwich Reopening on 17 May 2021

Royal Museums Greenwich has announce the reopening of the National Maritime Museum, Queen’s House, Cutty Sark and Royal Observatory Greenwich on 17 May 2021.

The National Maritime Museum and Queen’s House grounds, the Parkside café and shop have been open to public since 12 April 2021 and from 7 May 2021 visitors will get the chance to dine in the Queen’s House Dining Domes.

During lockdown, the museum carried out various restoration works across the sites and developed a one-way system and some restrictions will initially be in place to ensure the safety of all visitors and staff. Protective screens in the ticket hall and gift shop will be in place. Sanitiser stations will also be available throughout the sites, although to ensure we meet safety guidelines, some interactives will not be accessible.

Tickets must be purchased in advance to ensure social distancing can be maintained on site. Pre-booked time slots ensure that visits are spread throughout the day and sites don’t exceed their capacity.

At the National Maritime Museum, visitors will be able to see images of the cosmos from the world-renowned astrophotography competition Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2020.

Another fascinating exhibition reopening its doors at the National Maritime Museum is the Exposure: Lives at Sea. Bringing together photography taken around the world by those in the maritime sector, this exhibition shines a light on the forgotten but integral work of seafarers.

In collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery, Royal Museums Greenwich will host a major exhibition exploring royal portraiture, opening on 28 May 2021. Tudors to Windsors: British Royal Portraits will give visitors the opportunity to come face-to-face with the kings, queens and their heirs who have shaped British history and were so central to Greenwich. The exhibition will include over 150 works covering five royal dynasties. These are mainly drawn from the unparalleled collection of the National Portrait Gallery, and feature some of the most important artists to have worked in Britain, from Sir Peter Lely and Sir Godfrey Kneller to Cecil Beaton and Annie Leibovitz.

On 17 May 2021 the Queen’s House will be ready to welcome back the public and showcase its incredible artwork collection including works by Reynolds and Canaletto, and the display Faces of a Queen: The Armada Portraits of Elizabeth I. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see the three surviving Armada portraits; Royal Museums Greenwich’s portrait, and versions from the National Portrait Gallery and Woburn Abbey, side by side in Greenwich.

Also in the Queen’s House, visitors will have the unprecedented opportunity to access for free the Woburn Treasures, the outstanding private art collection of The Duke and Duchess of Bedford, whilst Woburn Abbey is closed for refurbishment. The exhibition includes works by distinguished artists such as Van Dyck, Reynolds, Gainsborough, Poussin and Canaletto.

Cutty Sark, the last-surviving tea clipper in the world, will open its doors once again and the visitors will explore its remarkable history as the fastest, record-breaking ship of its era. Just in time for the half-term, there will be tours to learn the lesser-known extraordinary stories of the Cutty Sark. There is also a brand new exciting experience starting June 2021, ‘Cutty Sark Rig Climb Experience’, where visitors will be able to climb from the main deck up the ship’s rigging to experience the heights the crew would have had to scare on a daily basis when out at sea.

Additionally, the Royal Observatory Greenwich, the historic home of time and space, will open the North side, which includes the Prime Meridian line, the Flamsteed House, the Camera Obscura and the Great Equatorial Telescope. Visitors will be able to see the magnificent craftmanship of John Harrison’s marine timekeepers, the apartments of the Royal Astronomers and learn about their work and lives at the observatory and step on the historic Prime Meridian line that divides the Eastern and Western hemispheres of the Earth.

For more information , visit the Royal Museums Greenwich website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Bow Street Police Museum due to open 2021

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

In early 2021, one of London’s first police stations will become the country’s newest independent museum. Bow Street Police Museum will sit inside no. 28 Bow Street, home of Bow Street Police Station and Magistrates’ Court for over a century. The ground floor cells and offices will become galleries, telling the story of the Bow Street Runners, the country’s first organised force, and the Metropolitan Police officers who walked the streets of Covent Garden in their footsteps.

Bow Street Police Museum is due to open in early 2021. It will sit within the new NoMad London Hotel, which will occupy the entire newly-restored building. The Museum will operate as an independent charity supported initially by the owners of the building, the Sydell Group, but eventually becoming self-sufficient.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

The Museum will be filled with stories of investigations, arrests and justice being served, from 18th century crime fighting to the moment the police station closed its doors in 1992, followed by the court in 2006. Along the way, it will explore Bow Street’s unique role in police, law and social history and the workings of the first Metropolitan Police station. And as well as telling the stories of the historic, sometimes infamous, trials heard at Bow Street Magistrates’ Court, the Museum will also instigate discussions about many aspects of police history, modern policing and social justice.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

Among the collections to be displayed will be the original dock from Court no. 2; early equipment used by the Bow Street Runners on patrol, including an original cutlass, a specially-made replica Runners uniform (featuring blue double-breasted coat, blue trousers, black felt hat, black boots and the red waistcoat that earned early officers the nickname ‘robin red breasts’); a beautiful reproduction of a collection of sketches by court artist William Hartley; and personal effects from former officers, including beat books, truncheons and items from their time on duty at Bow Street. Visitors will also be invited to spend time in ‘the tank’, the large cell that was often the destination
for men arrested for drunken behaviour in public.

Photograph by Cristian Barnett

In 1881, a new police station and courthouse opened in Covent Garden. For the next century and beyond, the building was a hive of activity and Metropolitan Police officers patrolled the streets, dealing with everything that came their way. People came in and out of the main station door all day and night, and officers took calls from the public, sent colleagues to incidents, interviewed suspects,
completed paperwork and oversaw prisoners.

People arrested by police officers at Bow Street were held overnight and tried at the Magistrates’ Court next door. The Court held a unique status that enabled it to deal with extradition proceedings, terrorist offences and cases related to the Official Secrets Act. This brought a string of notable cases to Bow Street, including IRA terrorist cases and the extradition cases against the former dictator of
Chile, General Augusto Pinochet. The Museum will share the tales of many of those who found themselves up before Bow Street’s judges, including the Kray Twins, Dr Crippen, Oscar Wilde and suffragettes Sylvia and Christabel Pankhurst and Mrs Drummond.

The Museum will also trace the life and times of Covent Garden, exploring how the market, theatreland, shops, bars, restaurants intertwined with Bow Street. Given their location, officers devoted much of their time to working closely with the hundreds of traders that filled Covent Garden’s fruit, vegetable and flower market, and sharing the time of day – and a cup of tea if they were in luck – with locals.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Venue: Bow Street Police Museum, 28 Bow Street, London WC2E 7AW
Admission: Entrance: £6.00; Concessions: £4.50 / £3.00; Children under 12 and carers: free
Opening: For the first six months we will operate three days a week Fri- Sun, 11.00 – 16.30

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The National Maritime Museum in Greenwich reopens on 7 September 2020

Royal Museums Greenwich have announced the reopening of the National Maritime Museum on 7 September. Visitors will once again be able to explore the story of Britain and the sea through science, trade, conflict, work and leisure in the world’s largest maritime collection.

The Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2019 exhibition has been extended to 13 September. Visitors can gaze upon exceptional astrophotography revealing the secrets the Universe, including the winning image, ‘Into the Shadow’ by Hungarian photographer László Francsics.

Entry to the National Maritime Museum will remain free. Time slots will have to be pre-booked online and a one-way visitor route will be in place.

In line with the government’s announcement on 31 July, face coverings must be worn inside the museum. Protective screens in the ticket hall and gift shop will be installed and sanitiser stations will also be available throughout to ensure the safety of all visitors and staff.

Initially, the interactive All Hands Children Gallery and Ahoy! Children’s Gallery will remain closed.

The announcement follows the phased approach to reopening Royal Museums Greenwich announced earlier this summer. Cutty Sark reopened on 20 July, the Royal Observatory Greenwich opened in part on 3 August and the Queen’s House reopened on 10 August.

At the Queen’s House, Faces of a Queen: The Armada Portraits of Elizabeth I will run until 31 August 2020. This is the first time the three surviving portraits have been displayed together in their 430-year history.

Additionally, Woburn Treasures has been extended until Easter 2021. This exhibition is a major collaboration, which will see significant works from the private art collection of The Duke and Duchess of Bedford on show in the Queen’s House. The collaboration marks the first time significant collection pieces have been on public display in a national museum since the 1950s.

For more information , visit the Royal Museums Greenwich website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

The Victoria and Albert Museum to reopen on 6 August 2020

Following one of the most significant closures in the museum’s history, the V&A has announced that it will reopen its doors to visitors on 6 August 2020.

Initially opening Thursday to Sunday each week, the V&A will reopen in phases. From 6 August 2020, visitors will able to enjoy all of the ground floor collection galleries including the iconic Medieval & Renaissance Gallery, the monumental Cast Courts, the stunning artefacts of The Jameel Gallery of Islamic Art and the much-loved Fashion Gallery, as well as the Europe 1600–1815 galleries on lower ground floor.

To coincide with the August Bank Holiday weekend, the first and second floor collection galleries will reopen on 27 August, including the ever-popular The William and Judith Bollinger Jewellery Gallery, Theatre & Performance Galleries, and the Photography Centre as well as our Paintings, Tapestries and Silver Galleries. The critically acclaimed exhibition Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk, which closed just two weeks into its run, has now been extended and will reopen on 27 August – 25 October alongside the museum’s Filthy Lucre installation.

A number of measures will be in place across the V&A to ensure that the museum is a safe, relaxing and inspiring place for visitors, staff and volunteers. Free timed tickets will be introduced to ensure that visitors can freely explore and discover the wonders of the V&A’s collection within a socially distanced environment. Further details on how we are preparing the V&A for reopening and the range of safety measures that are in place, from screens to sanitiser, can be found on the V&A website.

Alongside an extensive range of content and information, visitors will be able to go online and use the V&A’s digital map to make the most of their visit. In addition, from 3 August three self-guided trails, available on the V&A website, will explore highlights from the collection, the building’s architecture, and a selection of family favourites. The trails will link through to further online content including articles and videos to learn more about our collection pre or post visit. As the museum’s first and second floor galleries reopen from 27 August, additional trails, including a digital version of the museum’s African Heritage Tour and its LGBTQ Tour, will also be available.

The V&A’s forthcoming programme and opening dates for the next nine months are as follows:

Bags: Inside Out – 21 November 2020 – 12 September 2021
Epic Iran – 13 February – 30 August 2021
Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser – 27 March – 31 December 2021

Timed tickets to see the museum’s permanent collection and Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk are now available from the V&A website. Tickets for Bags: Inside Out will launch in August, and Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser and Epic Iran will launch in later 2020.

The Renaissance Watercolours exhibition will now be reimagined as a free display, opening November 2020 and presenting rare examples from the museum’s collection.

The reopening of the museum will see the delivery of major FuturePlan projects over the coming months. The museum’s stunning Raphael Court will reopen on 14 November, following a major redevelopment that includes full redecoration, state-of-the-art lighting and new digital interpretation. Visitors will be able to zoom in on the Cartoons, loaned to the V&A by Her Majesty The Queen from the Royal Collection, to reveal the texture and detail of the paintings like never before. The gallery houses some of the most significant Renaissance works in the UK and its relaunch will mark the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death.

Design: 1900–Now on the museum’s second floor, will open February 2021 and feature over a century of works from the V&A’s world-leading collection of modern and contemporary design including Margaret Calvert and Jock Kinneir’s iconic British Road Sign and the Mae West lips sofa by Salvador Dali. The gallery will explore the history of design and its impact on how we live, work, travel, communicate and consume as well as providing a new home for the museum’s celebrated Rapid Response Collection.

Opening hours:

From 6 August, the V&A will be open Thursday to Sunday each week from 11am to 3pm. From 27 August opening hours will be extended to 11am to 7pm. Free timed tickets to visit the museum’s collection will be release on a monthly basis. Keep in touch with us on social media, or check our website for the latest information.

Collection Galleries

Permanent collection galleries open from 6 August: Buddhism (The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Galleries of Buddhist Art), Sculpture (The Dorothy and Michael Hintze Galleries), Fashion, Islamic Middle East (The Jameel Gallery of Islamic Art), Japan (The Toshiba Gallery of Japanese Art), China (T.T. Tsui Gallery of Chinese Art), Korea, Cast Courts, Medieval & Renaissance, Europe 1600–1815.

Additional permanent collection galleries open from 27 August: Medieval and Renaissance (300–1600), Britain (1500–1760), Sacred Silver, Gold, Silver & Mosaics (The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Galleries), Paintings, Tapestries, Prints and Drawings (The Julie and Robert Breckman Gallery), Jewellery (The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery), Theatre & Performance, Photography Centre, Ironwork, Sculpture (The Dorothy and Michael Hintze Galleries).

V&A South Kensington

Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk

The ultimate symbol of Japan, the kimono is often perceived as traditional, timeless and unchanging. Kimono: Kyoto to Catwalk counters this conception, presenting the garment as a dynamic and constantly evolving icon of fashion. The exhibition reveals the sartorial and social significance of the kimono from the 1660s to the present day, both in Japan and in the rest of the world. Rare 17th- and 18th-century kimono are displayed for the first time in the UK, together with fashions by major designers and iconic film and performance costumes. The kimono’s recent reinvention on the streets of Japan is also explored through work by an exciting new wave of contemporary designers and stylists.

Filthy Lucre

Filthy Lucre is an immersive installation by contemporary American artist Darren Waterston, presenting a detailed reimagining of James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s famed Peacock Room – the sumptuous 19th-century dining room once housed just a stone’s throw away from the V&A and now installed at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Waterston has faithfully recreated each of the room’s individual elements with a twist, with the installation revealing a magnificent ruin crumbling under the weight of material decadence and the egos of those involved in its creation.

Bags: Inside Out

The UK’s most comprehensive exhibition dedicated to the ultimate accessory. From designer handbags to despatch boxes, vanity cases to military rucksacks, the exhibition will explore our longstanding fascination with the bag. Featuring innovative designs from Mulberry to Karl Lagerfeld, bags carried by Vivien Leigh to Sarah Jessica Parker, the heritage of Hermès to the streetwear of Off-White, and an exclusive look inside the world of the factory and atelier; Bags: Inside Out provides an unprecedented look at this global obsession.

Epic Iran

Epic Iran will explore 5000 years of art, design and culture, bringing together 300 objects from ancient, Islamic and contemporary Iran. It will be the UK’s first major exhibition on Iranian art and culture in more than 90 years that presents an overarching narrative from 3000 BCE to the present day. From sculpture, ceramics and carpets, to textiles, photography and film, the exhibition will comprise rarely seen objects from the V&A alongside international loans and significant private collections, including The Sarikhani Collection. Revealing new discoveries, this landmark exhibition will offer a fresh perspective on a country that is so often seen through a different lens in the news. Epic Iran will shine a light on one of the greatest historic civilisations, its journey into the 21st century and its monumental artistic achievements, which remain unknown to many.

Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser
Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser will celebrate one of the most iconic, imaginative and inspiring stories of all time. Offering an immersive and mind-bending journey down the rabbit hole, this fantastical exhibition will explore Alice in Wonderland’s origins, adaptations and reinventions over 158 years, charting its evolution from manuscript to a global phenomenon beloved by all ages.

Raphael Court
The Raphael Cartoons are loaned to the V&A by Her Majesty The Queen from the Royal Collection. The redevelopment of the Raphael Court is supported by Lydia and Manfred Gorvy, Julia and Hans Rausing, American Express, the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851, The Hintze Family Charitable Foundation, the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation, the American Friends of the V&A, and many other generous donors.

For more information and tickets, visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Natural History Museum to re-open Wednesday 5 August 2020

 

Following an almost five-month long closure, the longest period since the second world war, the Natural History Museum is throwing open the doors to its world-famous building in South Kensington from Wednesday 5 August. The Museum will initially re-open on Wednesdays to Sundays only and from 11am to 6pm (last entry at 5pm).

New measures will be in place to ensure staff and visitors can have a safe and enjoyable experience. To help manage the number of people in the Museum at any one time, capacity will be significantly reduced. It will be essential to book a free timed ticket in advance online at nhm.ac.uk or by phone. Museum Members and Patrons will have priority booking 48 hours before it opens to the public; they will also benefit from fast-track entry.

The vast majority of the Museum’s galleries will be open alongside its five-acre gardens. Strolls, picnicking, exploring pondlife and wildlife watching are all encouraged. Food and drink will be available to purchase either as takeaways or to enjoy at socially distanced seating. Transactions will be contactless where possible, but cash will be accepted.

The Museum’s popular Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition is planned to open in October with brand new winning images to captivate audiences. The Museum’s Ice Rink is set to also open in October with new measures in place to ensure a safe and enjoyable experience for skaters.

The major new exhibition, Fantastic Beasts: The Wonder of Nature, the result of a creative partnership between the Museum, the BBC and Warner Bros. will continue to be created on-site with the aim of welcoming guests to experience it this winter; more news on an opening date will be shared imminently.

Both the Museum’s main entrance on Cromwell Road and its Exhibition Road entrances will be open.

Invitation to local community groups

In recognition that many of our local audiences will have been disproportionally affected by COVID-19 we will be reaching out and working with local community organisations who are supporting families and young people who live in the surrounding boroughs to extend a special and exclusive visit offer.

Safety First
The Museum has achieved Visit Britain’s ‘We’re Good To Go’ industry standard by demonstrating adherence to the respective Government and public health guidance and the implementation of new safety measures.

Limiting visitor numbers will allow visitors to keep a safe distance from people who are not in the same household. Friendly and trained staff will be on hand to support visitors to have a great time and stay safe.

Hands-free hand sanitiser will be available at all entrances, cafes, shops, toilets, lifts and in the largest gallery spaces. Multiple toilet facilities across the site will be open with clear 2-metre queuing signage in place.

Acrylic protection panels will be in place in cafes, shops, visitor information and ticketing stations and staff who are not based behind these will be issued with face coverings.

We are recommending that all visitors wear a face covering during their visit and this will be made clear at the point of booking a timeslot. Additional reusable and washable face coverings will be available for purchase in the shops.

The vast majority of galleries will be open. Visitors will be able to plan their visit in advance with new online itineraries.

Lifts will be available for anyone with access needs and cloakroom facilities will be limited initially to large luggage items.

South Kensington site to open Wednesday 5 August – Wednesdays to Sundays, 11am-6pm

The Natural History Museum at Tring to open Wednesday 5 August – seven days a week

Admission remains free. To ensure a safe experience it is essential for visitors to book a timed slot online at nhm.ac.uk

The Natural History Museum at Tring
The Museum at Tring will also re-open on Wednesday 5 August, seven days a week: Free admission tickets will need to be booked in advance online. With numbers strictly capped to a very low capacity, visitors will be able to freely explore the Museum as they choose or follow the self-guided tours and activity trails. The majority of our permanent galleries will be open; the temporary exhibition space and the Rothschild Room will be closed initially as social distancing is harder to maintain in these areas.

The Digital Museum

For those unable to visit the Museum buildings just yet, digital offerings allows visitors to browse millions of specimens from the collection, take a virtual tour, participate in citizen science and access learning resources online.

Highlights include: an interactive experience about Hope the blue whale; audio guides narrated by Sir David Attenborough; activity ideas to try at home or in local outdoor spaces and the popular Nature Live Online interactive discussions featuring topical content with scientists and cutting-edge research.

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the National History Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

New Version of British Museum online collection covers over 4 million objects

The Lewis Chessmen. © The Trustees of the British Museum

The British Museum has overhauled its online collection database, allowing over 4 million objects to be seen by people anywhere in the world. This new version of the online database officially called the British Museum Collection Online has been unveiled earlier than planned so that people who are currently under lockdown measures due to Covid-19 can enjoy the treasures from one of the world’s great collections from the comfort of their own home.

This is the biggest update the Museum’s Collection Online has seen since being first created in 2007. It is now fully responsive, making it accessible on mobile and tablets alongside desktop browsers for the first time. The user experience has been completely overhauled, with more intuitive and powerful search technology that is easier to use and more accurate. The whole portal has also been given a major on-screen redesign.

Screenshots of Collection Online search results. © The Trustees of the British Museum

There are nearly 4.5 million objects available to be enjoyed, with 1.9 million images. The new database sees 280,000 new object photographs and 85,000 new object records published for the very first time, many of them acquisitions the Museum has made in recent years, including 73 portraits by Damian Hirst, a previously lost watercolour by Rossetti, and a stunning 3,000-year-old Bronze age pendant.

The Death of Breuze Sans Pitié by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. © The Trustees of the British Museum

The majority of the 1.9 million object images are available for anyone to use for free under a Creative Commons 4.0 license. Users no longer need to register to use these photographs, and can now download them directly to their devices, making it easier and quicker to access them for non-commercial activities such as sharing on social media.

A metope sculpture from the Parthenon frieze showing a mythical battle between a Centaur and a Lapith. © The Trustees of the British Museum

The British Museum’s collection is one of the biggest in the world: over half is now available to see online, making it one of the most expansive online museum collection databases from any global museum.

A relief plaque made of brass cast, part of the Benin Bronzes. © The Trustees of the British Museum

Collection Online includes the Museum’s most famous objects such as the Rosetta Stone, the artefacts of Sutton Hoo, the Cyrus Cylinder, the Parthenon Sculptures, and the Benin Bronzes.

But it also provides access to other parts of the museum collection, such as the entire collection of objects the Museum holds from Ancient Egypt, every item from Australia, over 750,000 prints by artists such as Rembrandt, William Hogarth and Kara Walker, over 50,000 English coins from the medieval period to the Tudors, and important sculpture from Ancient Greece and Rome.

Screenshots of Collection Online search results. © The Trustees of the British Museum

Object records include physical descriptions, information on materials, display and acquisition history, dimensions, previous owners and curatorial comments. Work is continuing to ensure this information is included as fully as possible on every object in the collection and to add new photographs.

Screenshots of Collection Online search results. © The Trustees of the British Museum

A major new addition is the ability to see object images up close, using zoom technology from the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF). This allows the fast, rich zoom and panning of images so viewers can see objects on a level of detail inaccessible to the naked eye. This will be available on a select number of key objects from today, including the Rapa Nui sculpture Hoa Hakananai’a and the Admonitions Scroll made in China over 1600 years ago. The number will then grow to thousands over the coming weeks.

The new online collection also sees an expansion of object records written in Chinese. All 1700 pieces in the Sir Percival David Collection of Chinese ceramics now have records in both English and Chinese. The Sir Percival David Collection has some of the finest Chinese ceramics in the world, and they are on long term loan to the British Museum from the Sir Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art.

The relaunch of the online collection comes as the British Museum sees a massive surge in traffic to its website as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and people having to stay at home. In the 28 days since the closure of the Museum on Wednesday 18 March 2020, britishmuseum.org had 1,495,336 users, and 1,848,421 visits/sessions. This was 120% up and 99% up respectively on the same period in 2019.

For more information, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The Nation’s Gallery, in the nation’s homes : National Gallery Online

Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas, Combing the Hair (‘La Coiffure’), about 1896 © The National Gallery, London

The National Gallery is bringing its pictures into our homes in a major new digital programme.

Inspired by the legacy of the Myra Hess concerts, which took place at the Gallery during the Second World War, the programme produced entirely from home across its social media, website and emails celebrates the creative possibilities of staying in and the ways that art can help mental wellbeing during the coronavirus lockdown.

The Gallery serves a digital audience of over 10 million people every year, with a digital reach of hundreds of millions of people. After record increases in visits to some of its online content of over 2,000% on last year, following closure of its Trafalgar Square site, the Gallery’s new digital programme looks at the different ways people can look at, use and respond to art wherever they are. Through this digital initiative the Gallery will be open 24/7 with free art for everyone online.

In A curated look, staff give talks on the Gallery’s pictures from their living rooms; the first inspires people to look at the way artists have painted what is around them indoors. Dr Francesca Whitlum-Cooper, the Gallery’s Associate Curator of Paintings 1600-1800, talks about paintings from the Gallery’s collection that celebrate domestic activities such as playing music and card games. Among the works Dr Whitlum-Cooper discusses are Chardin’s The House of Cards, Manet’s Eva Gonzalès, Degas’s Combing the Hair (‘La Coiffure’) and Vermeer’s Young Woman Standing at a Virginal.

Johannes Vermeer, A Young Woman standing at a Virginal, about 1670-2 © The National Gallery, London

As many people under lockdown are finding comfort in nature around their homes and in their gardens, another upcoming episode in the series looks at three expansive rural landscapes in the collection that take us from morning to night. As well as Rubens’s A View of Het Steen in the Early Morning and Corot’s The Four Times of Day; Night this talk includes that most treasured evocation of the British countryside, Constable’s The Hay Wain.

A series of online tutorials on ‘slow looking’ develops the Gallery’s mindfulness programme by showing online visitors how to look at pictures in depth and explore hidden details. The first of these asks us to take a closer, slower look at Turner’s Rain Steam and Speed – The Great Western Railway.

In Make and create, viewers are given suggestions and instructions for making and creating artworks at home, inspired by the collection. In the first episode, families are shown how to use their old newspapers and magazines to create a collage inspired by Rousseau’s painting of a tiger prowling in the undergrowth, Surprised! In an upcoming episode, one of the Gallery’s most popular paintings, Van Gogh’s Sunflowers, is the starting point to explore four fun drawing techniques for people to try at home.

The Google virtual tour of the Gallery is up 642% on the period prior to the Government’s instructions to stay at home, an increase of 3,046% on the same time last year. The Gallery’s collection pages (where you can zoom into paintings in detail and read about them in depth) have received 58% more views than the previous period (1 March 2020 -18 March 2020) and 10% more than this time last year.

Jean-Siméon Chardin, The House of Cards (Portrait of Jean-Alexandre Le Noir), about 1740-1 © The National Gallery, London

The National Gallery has a strong digital presence across its website and social media channels. All of the Gallery’s collection is represented online with a dedicated webpage, zoomable image, key facts and description

Some of the collection is also on other platforms that bring together many other cultural institutions such as Art UK and Google Arts & Culture.

The Gallery produces a wealth of digital content; behind the scenes videos, serialised content, Facebook and You Tube Lives. Plus, there is a large back catalogue on our YouTube channel of lectures, talks and events.

Recent available content to help people explore art while self-isolating

Titian

Titian Facebook live:
Making the Titian frames for the exhibition: https://youtu.be/yBpqBIMyDSw

Symbols and themes series

Eight female artists from the collection
Love and punishment, the meaning of arrows in art
How to spot saints in paintings:
The meaning of birds in paintings

Behind the scenes series

Behind the scenes playlist
Latest video – retouching Charles I portrait

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here