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Visit the Royal Collection Online

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

In these trying times, it may not be possible to visit certain attractions and museums, but you can enjoy a virtual visit and get some background to understand more of the remarkable history of London and beyond.

The Royal Collection is one of the largest and most important art collections in the world, spread among some 15 royal residences and former residences across the UK. Virtual visitors can browse more than 250,000 works of art from the Royal Collection online, enjoy 360-degree tours of palaces and exhibitions, download fun family activities, watch behind-the scenes films and more on the Royal Collection Trust website.

Highlights below include a virtual tour of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, film footage giving a closer look than ever before at the tiny treasures of Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, and curators’ picks of the most extraordinary clocks in the Royal Collection – just in time for the clocks changing in the UK this weekend.

Virtual tours

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is recognised around the world as the official London residence of Her Majesty The Queen. Developed in collaboration with Google Expeditions, this virtual tour gives users the chance to explore the Palace’s magnificent State Rooms in virtual reality or 360-degree format, and learn more from an expert curator about the treasures from the Royal Collection that furnish each room.

George IV: Art & Spectacle at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace
The most recent exhibition at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, George IV: Art & Spectacle explores the life and tastes of arguably the most magnificent of British monarchs. While the Gallery’s doors are temporarily closed, art-lovers can still experience George IV’s unrivalled collection of art through this virtual walkthrough.

Prince & Patron at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace
To mark the 70th birthday of His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, visitors to the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace in 2018 enjoyed a special display featuring a number of works of art personally selected by His Royal Highness. The exhibition can be enjoyed virtually on the Google Arts & Culture website.

Royal Collection behind-the-scenes films

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Condition checking Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House
Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, a 1:12 scale miniature royal palace designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, has been on display at Windsor Castle for nearly a century. This film goes behind the scenes as curators and conservators carry out a condition check of its structure and contents. One room at a time, each of the Dolls’ House’s 1,000 miniature objects is carefully removed for condition assessment, light cleaning and photography.

Conservation of Queen Victoria’s Throne
Queen Victoria’s State Throne Chair was made for the young queen upon her accession in 1837. In this film curators and conservators explain the throne’s symbolic decorative scheme and demonstrate the techniques used to clean its delicate gold leaf surface. The throne still stands in the Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, alongside that of Her Majesty The Queen, and can be seen by the public during the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace each year.

Japanese Samurai Armour
This film takes a close look at a rare and splendid Japanese samurai armour, sent to James I by Shōgun Tokugawa Hidetada in 1614. Decorated with gold lacquer dragons and lined with silk, it was the first of many lavish diplomatic gifts exchanged between the British and Japanese royal and imperial families. The armour will take centre stage in Royal Collection Trust’s forthcoming exhibition Japan: Courts and Culture at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, which will explore four centuries of diplomatic, artistic and cultural exchanges between Britain and Japan.

A Hidden Musical Surprise
As Royal Collection Trust conservators were restoring a 19th-century silver inkstand in the Royal Collection that had once belonged to Queen Mary, they discovered a tiny musical instrument hidden inside. In this short film, horological conservators restore the intricate miniature mechanism using miniscule tools, so that the inkstand’s enigmatic tune can be heard once again.

Digital catalogues

Queen Victoria’s Journals
The complete collection of Queen Victoria’s journals is available to the public for free in the UK. The 43,000 pages of journal entries give readers a unique insight into Victoria’s own thoughts about her remarkable life and reign – from her first diary entry at the age of 13 to her initial impressions upon meeting ‘beautiful’ Prince Albert three years later; her pride on her coronation day and her last entry just ten days before her death in 1901 aged 81.

Prince Albert: His Life and Legacy
As Consort of Queen Victoria, Prince Albert’s roles in national life included unofficial Private Secretary, a mentor to some of the greatest national projects of his day, and collector and patron of the arts. This website makes available some 23,500 items from the Royal Collection, Royal Archives and Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851, shedding new light on Albert’s profound influence on Victorian society.

Georgian Papers Programme
History enthusiasts can explore more than 100,000 documents in the Royal Archives and Royal Library relating to the Georgian period, and can even get involved in this ongoing digitisation project by helping to transcribe handwritten official and personal papers relating to George III, George IV, William IV and more.

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Up close with paintings in the Royal Collection

Lady at the Virginal with a Gentleman, ‘The Music Lesson’, by Johannes Vermeer
One of just 34 surviving paintings by Vermeer, ‘The Music Lesson’ is enormously popular with visitors to the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace each year. In this Google Arts & Culture story, users can explore the painting in minute detail and discover more from expert curators about Vermeer’s remarkable techniques, which have earned him the title ‘Master of Light’.

Massacre of the Innocents, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder
Usually on display in the State Apartments at Windsor Castle, Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s masterpiece brings together multiple narrative scenes to form one larger composition. This Google Arts & Culture story examines each episode one by one and details the changes made to the painting throughout its history to cover up the more disturbing elements of the story.

Activities for children

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

A variety of learning resources for children at nursery, primary and secondary level are freely available on the Royal Collection Trust website, helping parents and teachers to bring the curriculum to life.

Interactive Activities
In an interactive game, Bring on the Battle, children can learn about the siege tactics used to defend Windsor Castle from enemies in medieval times. They’ll also discover what it takes to become a knight and the best way to build and fortify a castle. History pupils can test their knowledge of Henry VIII by playing King of the Castle, revealing how heavy the King’s jousting armour was, and even the unusual things he ate for dinner.

Worksheets
A selection of downloadable worksheets can be printed at home, giving children the opportunity to get creative. Inspired by some of the beautiful objects in the Royal Collection, children can design their own Coat of Arms and paint their own portrait miniatures.

Leonardo da Vinci Schools Resource pack
An extensive resource pack was produced as part of Royal Collection Trust’s nationwide touring exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing in 2019. Developed in consultation with teachers, it contains activities, videos and worksheets that use Leonardo’s drawings as an entry point into a range of subjects, including Maths and Science. Each resource is helpfully matched to Key Stages at both primary and secondary level in the national curriculum for England, Wales and Scotland.

Downloadable publications

Maria Merian’s Butterflies
One of the most extraordinary female artists of her age, Maria Sibylla Merian was an intrepid German artist and scientist who brought the wonders of South America to Europe in the early 18th century. This charming free book brings together 200 of Merian’s dazzling illustrations of the natural world, produced during her travels through Suriname in South America in 1699.

High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson
The absurdities of fashion, the perils of love, political machinations and royal intrigue were the daily subject-matter of Thomas Rowlandson, one of the wittiest and most popular caricaturists of Georgian Britain. This free title, featuring almost 100 of Rowlandson’s finest comic works in the Royal Collection, offers a new perspective on an era best known through the novels of Jane Austen.

Curator’s Choice collections

Keeping Time: Clocks in the Royal Collection
The Royal Collection includes hundreds of historical clocks and watches that have been collected by monarchs through the centuries, many of which are among the finest ever made. From musical and organ clocks to complex astronomical clocks, this online collection brings together some of the most extraordinary timepieces in the Royal Collection.

Women Photographers in the Royal Collection
This online collection explores the historical and contemporary importance of women to the creation, study and dissemination of photographs. Users can browse highlights of the Royal Collection’s significant body of work by pioneering women photographers, including works by Frances Sally Day, Julia Margaret Cameron, Alice Hughes, Dorothy Wilding and Annie Leibovitz.

For more information, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to Horse Guards Parade

For many visitors to London, Horse Guards Parade is often seen as a short cut from Whitehall to Buckingham Palace. However, the large parade ground has a long and interesting history and is still used for large scale ceremonies like Trooping the Colour, Beating Retreat and the smaller scale but regular Changing The Queen’s Life Guard.

Horse Guards Parade was formerly the site of the Palace of Whitehall’s tiltyard, where tournaments that included jousting were held in the time of Henry VIII. It was also used in the annual celebrations of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth I. It has often been the main parade ground in London and has been used for a variety of reviews, parades and other ceremonies since the 17th century.

Sitting in the heart of the British Government it is surrounded by important buildings which have been used and are still used by the government and military purposes. Horse Guards Parade was once the Headquarters of the British Army, The Duke of Wellington was based here in the 19th century. The Parade ground is flanked by Admiralty House, the Treasury building (now used by the Cabinet Office) and the rear of 10 Downing Street. Despite its historical importance, in the late 20th century, the parade was used as a car park for senior civil servants.

Horse Guards Parade is the location of a number of military monuments and statues these include the Guards Memorial, the Royal Naval Division War Memorial, Equestrian statues of Field Marshals Roberts and Wolseley. To the south are the statues of Field Marshal Kitchener and of Admiral of the Fleet Mountbatten.

There is a Turkish cannon made in 1524 “by Murad son of Abdullah, chief gunner” which was captured in Egypt in 1801, The Cádiz Memorial, a French mortar mounted on a brass monster commemorates the lifting of the siege of Cádiz in Spain in 1812.

An oddity is the black background to the number 2 of the double sided clock which overlooks the Parade Ground and the front entrance, it is popularly thought to commemorate the time the last absolute monarch of England, Charles I, was beheaded at the Banqueting House opposite. One of the more bizarre uses of Horse Guards Parade was as the location of the beach volleyball at the 2012 London Summer Olympics.

Not as well known as Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace, Changing The Queen’s Life Guard has smaller crowds and no railings which allows spectators to get very close to the action.

‘The Queen’s Life Guard’, mounted on horses are a familiar sight as they ride to Change the Guard on Horse Guards Parade. The Queen’s Life Guard is normally provided by men of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment which consists of a Squadron of The Life Guards, who wear red tunics and white plumed helmets, and a Squadron of The Blues and Royals with blue tunics and red plumed helmets.

The Life Guards have stood guard at Horse Guards, since the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660. The New Guard leaves Hyde Park Barracks at 10:28 weekdays and 9:28 on Sundays to ride to Horse Guards Parade via Hyde Park Corner, Constitution Hill and The Mall on their way to the guard change ceremony. Changing the Life Guard takes place daily at 11:00 weekdays and 10:00 on Sundays. The ceremony lasts about half an hour and is full of pageantry and colour.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short History of Paddington Basin

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Paddington and Grand Junction Canal was built after the success of the Duke of Bridgewater’s canal between Liverpool and Manchester. The Paddington Canal was a 13.5-mile long waterway, which terminated in a four-acre area of water called the Paddington Basin opened for traffic in 1801 to great public rejoicings with bells ringing, flags, and cannons were fired.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This early excitement was replaced in the 1850s by concern when the Regent’s Canal was opened which led to a deterioration in trade. Around Paddington Basin were built wharves and warehouses dealing mostly with bricks, clay, coal, hay, cattle and vegetables.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the late 20th century, there were little need for warehouses and little business on the water and into the 21st century, a major redevelopment took place in the Paddington Basin area. Most of the development was modern buildings which housed small and medium-sized commercial offices for companies like Marks & Spencer. Most of the land north of the canal basin formed Merchant Square which included offices, homes and shops.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Basin includes a couple of unusual bridges, The Rolling Bridge was conceived by Thomas Heatherwick and The Merchant Square Footbridge (also known as The Fan Bridge).

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Merchant Square includes a life-size sculpture in memory of Sir Simon Milton who played a pivotal role in facilitating the regeneration of Paddington Basin. The Paddington Arm and Basin now includes a number of narrow boats and other boats and the water is surrounded by bars, restaurants and cafés.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is even a couple of floating restaurants and the area is now given over to leisure which is becoming very popular with people enjoying some peace and quiet next to the water and away from the surrounding busy streets.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to Mudchute Park and Farm on the Isle of Dogs

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A short distance from the skyscrapers of Canary Wharf is one of the largest city farms in Europe. This strange mix of urban and rural makes Mudchute Park and Farm a unique attraction for visitors.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Isle of Dogs is one of the fastest growing parts of London with a large number of developments, however this is relatively recent phenomenon. Up to the mid 18th century, the vast majority of the Isle of Dogs was uninhabited and used as pastures for animals.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The large open space where the Mudchute Park and Farm now stands was once grazing land until the mid 19th century when during the building of the nearby Millwall Docks led to the space being used for storage of millions of bricks. After the docks were completed, the area was used to dump the mud that was dredged from Millwall Dock. This mud was transferred from the dock to the field by a pipe leading to the area being called Mudchute. Over time the mud accumulated to create small hills and bumps, but towards the end of the 19th century there was concerns when the mudfield was considered a health hazard and the pipe which was discontinued in 1910.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

After the first World War, the area was used for allotments . At the beginning of the Second World War, the land was used for gun placements to attack the aircraft bombing the docks ( there is an Ack Ack gun in the farm to pay tribute to those who risked their lives). After the war, there were a number of schemes to use the land for housing. However a campaign by local residents and supporters led to the creation of an urban farm in 1977.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Since then Mudchute Park and Farm has developed into one of the largest city farms in Europe covering 32 acres and is maintained largely by local volunteers. The farm and park has worked hard to create diverse environment that attracts all forms of wild life.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Farm animals have been introduced over the years to give visitors a variety of experience, with a strong educational aspect with close ties with local schools and other community groups.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Whilst most visitors come from the local area, the farm and park has increased its visibility to attract visitors from further afield.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Mudchute Park and Farm is one of the hidden gems of London providing a wide range of rural pleasures near to the urban jungle of Canary Wharf.

For more information and tickets , visit the Mudchute website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Review : Museum of London Docklands in West India Docks

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Museum of London Docklands is a museum in West India Docks which tells the history of the River Thames and the growth of Docklands.

The museum opened in 2003 in grade I listed early-19th century Georgian warehouses built in 1802 on the side of West India Docks near to the Canary Wharf financial district. Much of the museum’s collection is from the Museum of London and archives of the Port of London Authority,

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The museum includes series of multimedia presentations including videos and houses a large collection of historical artifacts, models, and pictures in a number of galleries. The museum also has a dedicated children’s gallery called Mudlarks, bookshop and cafe.

The museum through a series of permanent galleries tells the story of how the Docklands were created and how they have changed.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The gallery entitled No.1 Warehouse explores the museum building itself which was originally No. 1 Warehouse of the West India Docks. Opened in 1802, the West India Docks were London’s first enclosed dock system.The gallery illustrates how London’s historic docks and warehouses operated.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Trade Expansion (1600-1800) and London, Sugar & Slavery (1600 – today) galleries consider the effect of global trade and some of its consequences.

City and River (1800-1840), The early 19th century brought great change to London’s river and port. The huge docks complex was just one aspect of the development. New bridges spanned the Thames and the Thames tunnel was completed.

The ever popular Sailortown (1840-1850) gallery recreates the atmosphere of Sailortown, the London district, close to the river and docks, centred around Wapping, Shadwell and Ratcliffe.

The First Port of Empire (1840-1880) and Warehouse of the World (1880-1939) galleries illustrate how London and the docks became the centre of world trade.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Docklands at War (1939-1945) shows how important the docks were for the war effort and how they became a prime target for enemy bombers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The New Port, New City gallery (1945 – present) recounts the ups and downs of London’s upriver docks after the war culminating in their closure from the 1960s through to the early 1980s. It also shows how Docklands became the site of Europe’s largest regeneration project which was to divide government and local communities.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Museum of London Docklands is a fascinating free museum in a historic building which tells the remakable story of London’s Docklands. Located near to the Canary Wharf financial district, it is an ideal oportunity to discover how the area became the centre for world trade before it became a centre for finance.

Location : Museum of London Docklands, No.1 Warehouse, West India Quay, London E14 4AL

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to St Katharine Docks in London

St Katharine Docks was one of the commercial docks in London which opened in 1828, the docks were built on the site of the former hospital of St Katharine’s by the Tower which dated back to the 12th century.

The decision to build the docks was controversial with around 11,000 people losing their homes and some 1250 houses demolished. The area was known for centuries for the medieval hospital of St. Katharine was originally founded in 1148 by Matilda of Boulogne and was the recipient of many gifts from kings and queens over the centuries.

Due to its favourable position next to the Tower of London, the decision for redevelopment was confirmed by an Act of Parliament in 1825, with construction starting in 1827. The project was undertaken by famous engineer Thomas Telford and was completed remarkably quickly with the docks opening in 1828.

The docks were designed in the form of two linked basins (East and West), with access to the Thames through an entrance lock. Steam engines designed by James Watt and Matthew Boulton kept the water level in the basins to an acceptable level. The cost of building the docks was estimated to be around two million pounds.

The docks were popular for a time with produce being bought into the centre of London, however as time moved on the inability to accommodate large ships began to limit their commercial success. In the 19th century, St Katharine Docks were amalgamated with the nearby London Docks. In 1909, the Port of London Authority took over the management of almost all of the Thames docks, including St Katharine.

The St Katharine Docks suffered considerable damage by German bombing during the Second World War and the docks were finally closed in the 1960s.

A number of commercial buildings were built in the 1970s including the Tower Hotel, however it was not until the 1990s that wholesale development took place that led to offices, public and private housing, a hotel, shops and restaurants, the Dickens Inn pub and a marina for small to medium-sized boats.

Since the 1990s, St Katharine Docks have become a popular location for those visiting the nearby Tower of London and workers from the surrounding offices.

The redevelopment has paid tribute to the history of the site with some of the old warehouses used for offices and retail. There is a wide range of ships and boats in the marina from superyachts to Thames sailing barges.


Famous boats regularly moored in the docks include the royal barge Gloriana and MV Havengore which is best known for carrying the body of Sir Winston Churchill as part of his State Funeral.

St Katharine Docks is little known to many visitors but offers a fascinating glimpse into London’s maritime and medieval history.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Short Guide to Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square is a famous public square in Central London, its name commemorates the British victory over the French in 1805. The location has been significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King’s Mews which kept the King’s Hawks. After a fire in 1534, the mews were rebuilt as stables until they were moved them to Buckingham Palace.

In the early 19th century , the site was redeveloped by John Nash and then Charles Barry until Trafalgar Square was officially opened to the public in 1844. Nelson’s Column was not part of Barry’s work and was funded by public subscription, the design selected of a 218 feet 3 inches (66.52 m) column topped by a statue of Nelson and guarded by four lions was not widely admired by the public when it was erected in 1843.

The square quickly became one of the centres of London and became a location for social and political demonstrations, The great Chartist rally in 1848 for social reforms began in the square, later demonstrations in the late 19th century led to social unrest and occasionally violence. In the 20th century, protests about Nuclear weapons and Vietnam in the 1950s and 60s . These were followed anti-apartheid protests in the 1980s and Poll Tax Riots in the 1990s.  More recently, there have been anti-war, climate change and anti austerity demonstrations taken place in the square.

The square is not only used for demonstrations, for many years it was the main focus for New Year celebrations and is used all year round for various festivals and community events. Every year since 1947 , a Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway and is erected over the Christmas period.

Although Nelson’s Column dominates the square, there are  fountains designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, four large bronze lions sculpted by Sir Edwin Landseer, there are other statues dotted around the square.

A bronze equestrian statue of George IV by Sir Francis Chantrey,was installed in 1844, General Sir Charles James Napier by George Cannon Adams in the south-west corner in 1855, and Major-General Sir Henry Havelock by William Behnes in the south-east in 1861. One plinth was left empty and in the 21st century, the “Fourth Plinth”, has been used to show specially commissioned artworks.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here