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Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at the Tate Modern from 8th March to 9th September 2018

Visitors to Tate Modern from  March 2018 will be offered a unique opportunity to view some of the most important paintings Picasso ever made. It includes three works featuring the artist’s lover Marie-Thérèse Walter which have not been shown together since 1932, the year they were created. Made over the course of only five days Nude, Green Leaves and Bust, Nude in a Black Armchair and The Mirror will be reunited as a highlight of The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy. Each painting is an exceptional loan to Tate Modern, originating from private collections across the globe, offering a once-in-a-lifetime chance to experience these outstanding works together.

These three paintings will be reunited for the first time since Picasso’s first full-scale retrospective held at the Galeries Georges Petit in Paris and the Kunsthaus in Zurich 85 years ago. They are celebrated for their role in reaffirming Picasso’s place at the centre of the art world in the early 20th century. Their bold colours and decisive lines describe a sleeping young woman, now instantly recognisable as the artist’s lover Marie-Thérèse Walter with whom he had begun an affair five years earlier, but unknown to viewers at the time. Walter’s horizontal form dominates the lower half of each composition, her head tipped back and the fluid lines of her profile reflecting the gently curving leaves of the philodendron plant in the background.

Picasso embarked on these paintings after an extraordinarily productive start to the year during which he painted such breath-taking works as Rest, Sleep and The Dream. Having recently turned 50 with his first retrospective looming, Picasso was determined to prove his creativity and assert his standing in the contemporary art world against rivals including Matisse. In only five days from Tuesday 8 until Saturday 12 March 1932 he produced these three extraordinary paintings, followed two days later by the iconic Girl Before a Mirror, which will also be on loan to Tate Modern from the Museum of Modern Art in New York. For the first time in 85 years all of these works and more will be shown together, allowing visitors to chart the boundless creativity of this remarkable year in Picasso’s career.

The EY Exhibition: Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy will open from 8 March to 9 September 2018 at Tate Modern.

For more information or book tickets , visit the Tate Modern website here

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Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography at The National Portrait Gallery – 1st March to 20th May 2018

Two ways of Life by Oscar Rejlander, 1856-7

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography (1 March – 20 May 2018), will combine for the first time ever portraits by Lewis Carroll (1832–98), Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–79), Oscar Rejlander (1813–75) and Lady Clementina Hawarden (1822-65).

The exhibition will be the first to examine the relationship between the four ground-breaking artists. Drawn from public and private collections internationally, it will feature some of the most breath-taking images in photographic history, including many which have not been seen in Britain since they were made.

Alice Liddell by Lewis Carroll, 1858

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography will be the first exhibition in London to feature the work of Swedish born ‘Father of Photoshop’ Oscar Rejlander since the artist’s death. it will include the finest surviving print of his famous picture Two Ways of Life of 1856-7, which used his pioneering technique combining several different negatives to create a single final image. Constructed from over 30 separate negatives, Two Ways of Life was so large it had to be printed on two sheets of paper joined together.

Seldom-seen original negatives by Lewis Carroll and Rejlander will both be shown, allowing visitors to see ‘behind the scenes’ as they made their pictures.

Mountain Nymph, Sweet Liberty by Julia Margaret Cameron, 1866

An album of photographs by Rejlander purchased by the National Portrait Gallery following an export bar in 2015 will also go on display together with other treasures from the Gallery’s world-famous holdings of Rejlander, Cameron and Carroll, which for conservation reasons are rarely on view. The exhibition will also include works by cult hero Clementina Hawarden, a closely associated photographer. This will be the first major showing of her work since the exhibition Lady Hawarden at the V&A in London and the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles in 1990.

Lewis Carroll’s photographs of Alice Liddell, his muse for Alice in Wonderland, are among the most beloved photographs of the National Portrait Gallery’s Collection. Less well known are the photographs made of Alice years later, showing her a fully grown woman. The exhibition will bring together these works for the first time, as well as Alice Liddell as Beggar Maid on loan from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Photographic study by Clementina Hawarden.

Visitors will be able to see how each photographer approached the same subject, as when Cameron and Rejlander both photographed the poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson and the scientist Charles Darwin, or when Carroll and Cameron both photographed the actress, Ellen Terry. The exhibition will also include the legendary studies of human emotion Rejlander made for Darwin, on loan from the Darwin Archive at Cambridge University.

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography celebrates four key nineteenth-century figures, exploring their experimental approach to picture-making. Their radical attitudes towards photography have informed artistic practice ever since.

The four created an unlikely alliance. Rejlander was a Swedish émigré with a mysterious past; Cameron was a middle-aged expatriate from colonial Ceylon (now Sri Lanka); Carroll was an Oxford academic and writer of fantasy literature; and Hawarden was landed genty, the child of a Scottish naval hero and a Spanish beauty, 26 years younger. Yet, Carroll, Cameron and Hawarden all studied under Rejlander briefly, and maintained lasting associations, exchanging ideas about portraiture and narrative. Influenced by historical painting and frequently associated with the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood, they formed a bridge between the art of the past and the art of the future, standing as true giants in Victorian photography.

Victorian Giants: The Birth of Art Photography will include portraits of sitters such as Charles Darwin, Alice Liddell, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Thomas Carlyle, George Frederick Watts, Ellen Terry and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.

If you would like to find out more about the exhibition, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Anthea Hamilton will be the next artist to undertake the Tate Britain Commission

Tate Britain announced Anthea Hamilton as the next artist to undertake the Tate Britain Commission. Unveiled for the first time on 21 March 2018, Hamilton will reveal a major new work, transforming the heart of Tate Britain into an immersive installation that will combine sculpture and performance. The annual commission, supported by Sotheby’s, invites a contemporary British artist to create a new artwork in response to Tate Britain’s grand Duveen Galleries.

Shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2016, Anthea Hamilton is renowned for her bold, often humorous works which incorporate references from the worlds of art, design, fashion and popular culture. She has exhibited widely with recent large-scale, site-specific installations including her Turner Prize nominated exhibition Lichen! Libido! Chastity! at the SculptureCenter in New York, re-staged at Tate Britain in 2016, and Anthea Hamilton Reimagines Kettle’s Yard at The Hepworth Wakefield.

The Tate Britain Commission 2018: Anthea Hamilton is the latest in a series of contemporary commissions for Tate Britain’s Duveen Galleries which address the heritage of the space as a sculpture gallery. Artists are invited to develop a new work in response to the grand space of Tate Britain’s neo-classical Duveen Galleries. Artists who have previously undertaken commissions in the Duveens at Tate Britain include Cerith Wyn Evans (2017), Pablo Bronstein (2016), Christina Mackie (2015), Phyllida Barlow (2014), Simon Starling (2013), Patrick Keiller (2012), Fiona Banner (2010), Eva Rothschild (2009), Martin Creed (2008), Mark Wallinger (2007), Michael Landy (2004), Anya Gallaccio (2002) and Mona Hatoum (2000).

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life at Tate Britain – 28th February to 27th August 2018

A landmark exhibition at Tate Britain next year will celebrate how artists have captured the intense experience of life in paint. All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life will showcase around 100 works by some of the most celebrated modern British artists, especially Lucian Freud and Francis Bacon. The exhibition brings together major works by Walter Sickert, Stanley Spencer, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj, Leon Kossoff, Paula Rego, Jenny Saville, Lynette Yiadom-Boakye and many others.

Key paintings spanning Freud’s career will explore his studio as both context and subject of his work and will show how his unflinchingly honest depictions of models became more sculptural and visceral over time, in works such as Frank Auerbach 1975-6 and Sleeping by the Lion Carpet 1996. In contrast to Freud’s practice of working from life, the exhibition will look at Bacon’s relationship with photographer John Deakin, whose portraits of friends and lovers were often the starting point for Bacon’s work, including Portrait of Isabel Rawsthorne 1966. Earlier works by Bacon like Study after Velazquez 1950 will be shown alongside a sculpture by Giacometti, both artists having explored the enduring presence of isolated figures.

Looking to earlier generations, the exhibition will show how this spirit in painting had been pursued by artists like Walter Sickert and Chaïm Soutine. This generation’s work encompassed a wide variety of subjects, from Auerbach’s and Kossoff’s enduring fascination with London’s streets and public spaces to F.N. Souza’s spiritual and symbolic figures, and from Coldstream’s and Freud’s focus on the body in isolation to Michael Andrews’s and R.B. Kitaj’s interest in group scenes and storytelling.

The exhibition will also shed light on the role of women artists in the traditionally male-dominated field of figurative painting. Paula Rego explores the condition of women in society and the roles they play over the course of their lives, while always referring to autobiographical events, as in The Family 1988. Her work underwent a particularly profound change in the late 1980s and 1990s when she returned to working from life. The exhibition will also celebrate a younger generation of painters who continue to pursue the tangible reality of life in their work. Contemporary artists like Cecily Brown, Celia Paul, Jenny Saville and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye work in dialogue with this tradition while also taking the painting of figures in new directions.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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London Nights at the Museum of London – 11th May 2018 to 11th November 2018

Photograph by Nick Turpin, from Through a Glass Darkly © Nick Turpin

The Museum of London explores nocturnal London in a major new photography exhibition, London Nights which opens on the 11th May 2018.

London Nights will present the ambience, activities and emotions one might encounter after dark through contemporary and historic photographs, ranging from 19th century to the present day. The exhibition will focus on both the buzzing centre of the capital and the quieter corners of suburbia and will explore the familiar and unknown of London after dark.

Leicester Square 1900-1909 from series ‘London’ © Estate of Alvin Langdon Coburn

The exhibition will highlight three themes. The first section, London Illuminated, focuses on the aesthetic of the city at night, portraying London awash with artificial light. Looking at floodlit landmarks, neon-lit venues and vistas of the skyline, this section depicts themes of night-walking and tourism and presents alternative viewpoints.

East End Underground Station Shelter, 1940. Bill Brandt Digital Image © Museum of London

The second section, Dark Matters, deals with the more sinister side to evenings. It examines how the night can evoke feelings of fear, threat and vulnerability, both perceived and real. Ranging from documentary to conceptual and depicting images from bombing during the Blitz to scenes of crime, this section deals with the emotions of the night and offers both actual and imagined scenarios. 

A group of male and female skinhead ‘Mods’ 1969. Photographer Terry Spencer © Cara Spencer

The final section, Switch On Switch Off, looks at what happens at the end of daylight. Whether that be commuting home from work, just starting work or seeking out night life, the images in this section will explore nocturnal pursuits, whether they be work, rest or play. 

From the series ‘Dark City’ by William Eckersley © William Eckersley 2011

The exhibition presents work from almost 60 photographers and lens based artists, with at least 200 photographs and some film on show. It will draw upon the Museum of London’s own extensive photography collection as well as many significant loans from other collections and active photographers. It will be an atmospheric space giving a real sense of the transition of night time in one of the biggest metropolises in the world.

Glass lantern slide of the Embankment at Chelsea, photographed at night, made by Mercie Lack © Museum of London

Some of the photographs featured in the exhibition include: Through a Glass Darkly, Nick Turpin, A group of male and female skinhead ‘Mods’, Terry Spencer, 1969, East End Underground Shelter, Bill Brandt, 1940, Dark City, William Eckersley, 2011, Glass lantern slide of the Embankment at Chelsea, Mercie Lack and Leicester Square 1900-1909 from series ‘London’, Alvin Langdon Coburn.

There will be a range of events happening in conjunction with the exhibition. The museum will be open late every Friday of the exhibition’s run, to allow visitors to engage with the photography after hours. There will be two major, curated Lates exploring themes from within the exhibition and a wide range of evening, week day and weekend workshops and events.

If you would like further information, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Part of Whitechapel’s famous monster fatberg is coming to the Museum of London

Whitechapel fatberg (c) Museum of London

The Museum of London will be treading new ground when they display the only remaining piece of the enormous fatberg discovered under London’s streets. The display at the Museum of London is part of their year-long season, City Now City Future. Sucked from the Victorian sewers of Whitechapel, the now infamous fatberg will be on show in the museum in 2018.

Whitechapel fatberg (c) Thames Water

Having hit the headlines in more than 115 countries, the monster fatberg has become London’s newest celebrity and has fascinated and disgusted people all over the world. The Whitechapel fatberg was one of the largest ever found in London, weighing a colossal 130 tonnes, the equivalent of 11 double decker buses and stretching over 250 metres – six metres longer than Tower Bridge. The foul blockage was a congealed mass of fat, oil, grease, wet wipes and sanitary products. The existence of this fatberg highlights the pressures fat and modern rubbish are putting on London’s historic infrastructures and is a comment on our increasingly disposable society.

Whitechapel fatberg (c) Thames Water

The Museum of London’s year long season City Now City Future discusses similar issues around modern day living. By the year 2050, over 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban environments. This rapid increase in population places even more pressure on infrastructures. Coined in London, the vivid term ‘fatberg’ is now used by cities throughout the world to draw attention to a common menace.

clogged pipe (c) Thames Water

Seeking to solve this problem, Thames Water has now converted most of the Whitechapel fatberg into biodiesel, turning a nauseating waste problem into a cleaner-burning, greenhouse gas reducing fuel which will benefit the environment.

If you would like further information, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Charles I: King and Collector at the Royal Academy – 27th January to 15th April 2018

In January 2018, the Royal Academy of Arts, in partnership with Royal Collection Trust, will present Charles I: King and Collector, a landmark exhibition that will reunite one of the most extraordinary and influential art collections ever assembled. During his reign, Charles I (1600-1649) acquired and commissioned exceptional masterpieces from the fifteenth to the seventeenth century, including works by Van Dyck, Rubens, Holbein, Titian and Mantegna, amongst others. Charles I was executed in 1649 and just months later the collection was offered for sale and dispersed across Europe. Although many works were retrieved by Charles II during the Restoration, others now form the core of collections such as the Musée du Louvre and the Museo Nacional del Prado.

Charles I: King and Collector will reunite around 150 of the most important works for the first time since the seventeenth century, providing an unprecedented opportunity to experience the collection that changed the appreciation of art in England. By 1649, the collection of Charles I comprised around 1,500 paintings and 500 sculptures.

Charles I: King and Collector will include over 90 works generously lent by Her Majesty The Queen from the Royal Collection. Major lenders will also include The National Gallery, London, the Musée du Louvre, Paris, the Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid, as well as numerous other public and private collections.

Anthony van Dyck’s monumental portraits of the king and his family will form the core of the exhibition: his first major commission upon his arrival in England, Charles I and Henrietta Maria with Prince Charles and Princess Mary (‘The Greate Peece’), 1632 (The Royal Collection), and his two magnificent equestrian portraits, Charles I on Horseback with M. de St. Antoine, 1633 (The Royal Collection), and Charles I on Horseback, 1637-38 (The National Gallery, London). They will be shown together with Van Dyck’s most celebrated and moving portrait of the king, Charles I (‘Le Roi à la chasse’), c.1635 (Musée du Louvre, Paris), which will return to England for the first time since the seventeenth century.

Charles I commissioned some of the most important artists of his day, and the exhibition will include Peter Paul Rubens’s Minerva Protects Pax from Mars (‘Peace and War’), 1629-30 (The National Gallery, London) and his Landscape with Saint George and the Dragon, 1630-5 (The Royal Collection) as well as Van Dyck’s spectacular Cupid and Psyche, 1639-40 (The Royal Collection). Particular attention will be given to the patronage of Queen Henrietta Maria, including works by Orazio Gentileschi and Guido Reni.

In addition, the exhibition will present the most important Renaissance paintings from the collection, including Andrea Mantegna’s monumental series, The Triumph of Caesar, c.1484-92 (The Royal Collection), which will command a dedicated gallery within the exhibition, as well as Titian’s Supper at Emmaus, c.1530 (Musée du Louvre, Paris), and Charles V with a Dog, 1533 (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid). Other Renaissance artists represented are Correggio, Agnolo Bronzino, Jacopo Bassano, Tintoretto and Paolo Veronese as well as Albrecht Dürer, Jan Gossaert, Hans Holbein the Younger and Pieter Bruegel the Elder.

Further highlights will be the celebrated Mortlake tapestries of Raphael’s Acts of the Apostles, c.1631-40 (Mobilier National, Paris), arguably the most spectacular set of tapestries ever produced in England, as well as the precious works formerly kept in the Cabinet at Whitehall Palace, including paintings, statuettes, miniatures and drawings.

Admission

£20.00 full price (£18 without Gift Aid donation); concessions available; children under 16 and Friends of the RA go free.

For more information , visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here