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Exhibition Review : Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition 2018 at Somerset House – 20th April to 6th May 2018

The picturesque Somerset House is the location of the Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition 2018 which runs from  20th April to 6th May 2018.

Now in its 11th year, Sony World Photography Awards is one of the world’s largest and most diverse photography Awards, spanning four different competitions (Professional, Open, Youth, Student Focus). 2018 has seen record entries to the fair, with nearly 320,000 images submitted from over 200 countries and territories.

 The coveted Photographer of the Year title was presented to British artist Alys Tomlinson for her series Ex-Voto, winning the photographer $25,000. The work was praised by the jury for its beautiful production, technical excellence and sensitive illustration of pilgrimage as a journey of discovery and sacrifice to a greater power.

Tomlinson was selected from the 10 category winners of the Professional competition,  the overall winners of the Awards’ Open (best single image), Youth and Student Focus competitions were also revealed.

 All winners were flown to the London awards ceremony and received Sony digital imaging equipment, publication in the winners’ book and their work will be shown as part of the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition at Somerset House, London.

Professional category winners.

Architecture: Gianmaria Gava, Italian with Buildings

Contemporary Issues: Fredrik Lerneryd, Swedish with Slum Ballet

Creative: Florian Ruiz, French with The White Contamination

Current Affairs & News: Mohd Samsul Mohd Said, Malaysian with Life Inside the Refugee Camp

Discovery: Alys Tomlinson, British with Ex-Voto

Landscape: Luca Locatelli, Italian with White Gold

Natural World & Wildlife: Roselena Ramistella, Italian with Deep Land

Portraiture: Tom Oldham, British with The Last of The Crooners

Sport: Balazs Gardi, Hungarian with Buzkashi

Still Life: Edgar Martins, Portuguese with Siloquies and Soliloquies on Death, Life and Other Interludes

Youth Photographer of the Year – Megan Johnson, American, Age 16

Student Photographer of the Year – Samuel Bolduc, Canadian, Age 20

Outstanding Contribution to Photography – Candida Höfer

Every year the Awards’ gives an Outstanding Contribution to Photography (OCP) prize. Past winners have included Martin Parr, Elliot Erwitt and Mary Ellen Mark. This year’s winner is the celebrated German artist Candida Höfer. A special selection of her large scale, striking architectural photographs is exhibited alongside the Awards’ photographs.

This year the exhibition is curated by Mike Trow, ex-Picture Editor, British Vogue and covers the entire ground floor exhibition space of Somerset House, spanning shortlisted and winning images from all categories of this year’s competition; from current affairs to ‘discovery’, travel and architecture to ‘creative’, street photography to wildlife, and more.

This fascinating exhibition gives visitors a snapshot of modern contemporary photography by professionals and non-professionals. The small intimate spaces within Somerset House allow visitors to explore the photographs in detail and marvel at the diversity of subjects and themes. The Sony World Photography Awards is one of the major platforms for the promotion of photography culture and this exhibition provides an opportunity to see a series of stunning images.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and to book tickets for the exhibition, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review : Fashioned from Nature at the Victoria and Albert Museum – 21st April 2018 to 27th Jan 2019

The Victoria and Albert Museum presents a major exhibition that explores the often complex relationship between fashion and the natural world since 1600. The story of how fashionable dress has constantly drawn on the beauty of nature is told through over 300 objects.

The exhibition provides plenty of evidence that the natural world has always provided inspiration for fashion. One of the earliest pieces in the exhibition, a women’s jacket from the early 1600s, is embroidered with designs of pea-shoots and flowers. There is 1780s man’s waistcoat, expertly embroidered with a pattern of Macacque monkeys. More recently there is a Gucci’s contemporary bag decorated with stag beetle motifs,  a 2016 Giles Deacon haute-couture dress features a pattern of bird’s eggs and gowns from Jean Paul Gaultier (1997) and Busvine (1933-4) both feature leopard print.

Few would question, the natural world as inspiration, however including the creatures themselves is slightly different. The exhibition includes a an 1875 pair of earrings formed from the heads of two real Honeycreeper birds and a 1860s muslin dress decorated with the iridescent green wing cases of hundreds of jewel beetles. This was the tip of the iceberg, birds, feathers, furs, whalebone and turtle shells are just a few of the materials that were taken directly from nature.

Raw materials played an important part in the global trade of the 17th and 18th centuries especially silk, flax, wool and cotton. The exhibition includes an 18th court dress that includes a variety of materials from all over the world.  At various times, whole nations depended on the revenue from raw materials and international trade grew with the import of precious materials to satisfy the demand for high quality products.

Although the introduction of man-made materials enabled fashionable dress to be available to the masses, the textile industry contributed greatly to the problems of air and water pollution.

Moving upstairs in the exhibition, the emphasis is more on the 20th and 21st centuries and shows a  display of posters, slogan clothes and artworks that illustrate the protest movements that have helped draw attention to some of the harmful side of fashion. The exhibition features the outfit worn by Vivienne Westwood whilst protesting against climate change. A man’s outfit from Katharine Hamnett’s 1989 ‘Clean Up or Die’ collection is on show alongside posters from Fashion Revolution, a collective aiming to change the way clothes are sourced, produced and consumed.

Menswear and womenswear from Stella McCartney, is displayed alongside a upcycled dress by Christopher Raeburn. The dress made from recycled plastic bottles worn by actor Emma Watson with a Calvin Klein look is also featured

The exhibition also explores some of the solutions created to reduce fashion’s impact on the environment.  These include a dress grown from plant roots by the artist Diana Scherer, who uses seed, soil and water to train root systems into textile-like material, a bio-luminescent genetically-engineered silk dress created by Sputniko! and a tunic and trousers made from synthetic spider silk from Bolt Threads x Stella McCartney. Vegea use grape waste from the wine industry to form a leather-substitute and their Grape gown is on show, as is a Ferragamo ensemble made from ‘Orange Fiber’ derived from waste from the Italian citrus industry and an H&M Conscious dress made from recycled shoreline plastic.

This thought-provoking exhibition provides evidence that fashion has been inspired by nature but has also exploited nature in often cruel and bizarre ways. The exhibition illustrates how this  complex relationship has developed over the past 400 years and how the search for raw materials have also impacted on global trade with often serious consequences on producers and suppliers. Part of the exhibition considers how many aspects of this legacy has been challenged in recent years with a series of contemporary designers looking to provide creative and sustainable popular fashion.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Concrete Dreams at the Southbank Centre – 10th April to 29th April 2018

A new Southbank Centre exhibition, Concrete Dreams explores the remarkable creative history of arts venues, the Queen Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room. The venues are reopening to the public after two years of extensive restoration and redesign.

The exhibition consists of an immersive audio-visual backstage journey which sets in context the rich history and behind the scenes secrets of the venues. Visitors on the tour start at the Queen Elizabeth Hall artists’ entrance and follow in the footsteps of all the legendary artists who performed on these stages at the start of their careers in the 60s, with a roll call that includes Pink Floyd, Cleo Laine and Daniel Barenboim.  

After collecting your stage pass, visitors are given rare access backstage, travel through the working scene dock, visit an artists’ lounge, go into the dressing rooms and ending on a surprise finale.

Throughout these areas are unique archives in which the past and present is brought to life with live performance footage, recordings and printed materials.

Highlights include 60s and early 70s archives of live performance footage, poetry recordings and print materials from stars including Deep Purple, London Sinfonietta, Imrat Khan, T Rex, David Bowie and Celeste Dandeker. Special events like the live film footage of the very first performance of Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells 1973 and the performance of Schubert’s Trout Quintet in 1967, featuring Jacqueline du Pré and Daniel Barenboim are also shown.

The building of the venues were highly controversial and the archives include some of the previously unseen correspondence between London County Council and the venues’ young architects and early original photography and architect blueprints from 1961.

 In the dressing room area, some of the early art events at the Hayward Gallery are featured with posters about Gilbert and George,Kinetic psychedelia and Bridget Riley.

 The end of the exhibition involves moving on the stage in the Queen Elizabeth Hall  to enjoy an innovative multimedia show that celebrates many of the artists that have graced the very stage you are sitting on.

This fascinating exhibition challenges some of the preconceived ideas that the reopened venues where generally used just for classical concerts. In reality, the venues from the 1960s have been used for a wide variety of artistic events and has often played an important part in the careers of a large number of artists before they became superstars in their particular field. The new diverse programme of events in the venues is not a new beginning for the venues but part of the remarkable legacy illustrated by this exhibition.  

The final weekend of the Concrete Dreams event from the 27th – 29 April will involve three full days of  live performances and participation, with Queen Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room filled with music, dance, workshops and talks celebrating the dynamic and vivid performance history of the 1960’s buildings, whilst looking  to the future.

A large number of free events includes 60s Big Sing, a participatory vocal performance workshop celebrating songs of the 60s – from Bowie to Pink Floyd. These include a new collaborative contemporary dance and music piece Our Veranda, performed by Freddie Opoku-Addaie, a new music composition Echoes in Time: Drake Music and dance company Corali’s new work 9 Windows Reimagined.

Other Concrete Dreams Weekend highlights include:

In conversation with folk singer Sam Lee and folk legend Shirley Collins

A late night concert of Sam Lee’s unique Singing With Nightingales

Rambert Dance, who originally rehearsed in the foyer of QEH in the 60s, returning to the foyer for a family workshop

Fifty Poems from Five Decades – with ten of the finest poets writing in the UK today,including Simon Armitage and Caleb Femi

Performances of South Asian dance, electronica, pop, Indian classical music, western classical music and jazz

The Concrete Dreams exhibition is free, but you must book for tours and opens to the public on Tuesday 10 April and Concrete Dreams Weekend runs from Friday 27 – Sunday 29 April.

Photographs taken with permission of Southbank Centre.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly  Recommended

For more information, visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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here

 

Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition 2018 at Somerset House – 20th April to 6th May 2018

Copyright: © Andreas Pohl, Germany, Winner, Open, Architecture (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

The picturesque Somerset House is the location of the Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition 2018 which will run from  20th April to 6th May 2018.

Copyright: © Mikkel Beiter, Denmark, Winner, Open Travel and Denmark National Award, 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Now in its 11th year, Sony World Photography Awards is one of the world’s largest and most diverse photography Awards, spanning four different competitions (Professional, Open, Youth, Student Focus). 2018 has seen record entries to the fair, with nearly 320,000 images submitted from over 200 countries and territories.

 Copyright: © Justyna Zdunczyk, Poland, Winner, Open Wildlife and Winner, Poland National Award, 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

The 10 Open category winners have already been announced after being judged by an expert panel of judges. 

 The Open category winners are:

 Architecture: Andreas Pohl, German with the image The Man and the Mysterious Tower

Copyright: © Panos Skordas, Greece, Winner, Open Culture, and Winner, Greece National Award, 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Culture: Panos Skordas, Greek with image Young Minotaur

Enhanced: Klaus Lenzen, German with image Every Breath you Take

Landscape & Nature: Veselin Atanasov, Bulgarian with image Early Autumn

Motion: Fajar Kristianto, Indonesian with image The Highest Platform

Copyright: © Nick Dolding, United Kingdom, Winner, Open Portraiture and Winner, United Kingdom National Award, 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Portraiture: Nick Dolding, British with image Emile

Still Life: Richard Frishman, American with image Sunday Buffet at Jerry Mikeska’s BBQ;

Columbus, Texas 2017

Copyright: © Manuel Armenis, Germany, Winner, Open Street Photography and Winner, Germany National Award, 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Street Photography: Manuel Armenis, German with image Old Friends

Travel: Mikkel Beiter, Danish with image Shapes of Lofoten

Wildlife: Justuna Zduńczyk, Polish with image An Unexpected Meeting

This year the exhibition is curated by Mike Trow, ex-Picture Editor, British Vogue and will cover the entire ground floor exhibition space of Somerset House, spanning shortlisted and winning images from all categories of this year’s competition; from current affairs to ‘discovery’, travel and architecture to ‘creative’, street photography to wildlife, and more.

Every year the Awards’ gives an Outstanding Contribution to Photography (OCP) prize. Past winners have included Martin Parr, Elliot Erwitt and Mary Ellen Mark. This year’s winner is the celebrated German artist Candida Höfer. A special selection of her large scale, striking architectural photographs will be exhibited alongside the Awards’ photographs.

The 2018 Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition takes place at Somerset House from 20 April – 6 May.

For more information and to book tickets for the exhibition, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review: Monet and Architecture at the National Gallery – 9th April to 29th July 2018

The National Gallery presents the first purely Monet exhibition to be staged in London for more than twenty years. The exhibition entitled Monet & Architecture explores some of the lesser known aspects of the artist’s work.  

The exhibition features more than seventy-five paintings by Monet and spans his long career from its beginnings in the mid 1860s to the public display of his Venice paintings in 1912. More than a quarter of the paintings in exhibition come from private collections around the world including works little-known and rarely exhibited.

Monet & Architecture  is displayed in three sections – The Village and the Picturesque, The City and the Modern, and The Monument and the Mysterious. Each section illustrates how Monet used buildings in a variety of ways often not as the main subject but as part of a larger picture.

Although, most people think of Claude Monet as a painter of landscape, sea or gardens, this exhibition explores his often overlooked work in terms of architecture.

In the first room, there are a series of paintings from Normandy , the village of Vetheuil where Monet moved with his family and the Netherlands where Monet was fascinated by the huts, bridges and windmills standing out against the flat landscape.

The second room follows the Village and Picturesque theme but features a number of coastal paintings from the Normandy coast near Dieppe. A favourite location was the small village of Varengeville especially the area around the small village church.

In 1884, Monet followed the well-worn tourist path to the Mediterranean coast, some of the paintings include the 15th century bridge at Dolceacqua and the hilltop village of Bordighera. Fascinated by the light along the coast, Monet returned back to the coast in 1888 to paint at the ancient town of Antibes.

Many of paintings up to this point feature Monet looking for the unusual and picturesque man-made items in a natural landscape. In the next main theme of the exhibition, The City & the Modern, the paintings have a predominately urban landscape. Monet lived in London during the early 1870s when he fled the Franco Prussian war and was inspired by Thames and the Houses of Parliament to paint a series of paintings, there are also a series of 10 paintings of Argenteuil and the Parisian suburbs from the mid-1870s, seven Rouen Cathedrals from 1892–5, and the exhibition finishes with nine Venice canvases from 1908.

These urban landscapes illustrate that Monet’s use of buildings and architecture is often less concerned about the building itself but uses buildings as mirrors, to convey the play of light. the Venice canvases especially of the Doge’s Palace portray these qualities.

This fascinating exhibition provides plenty of evidence that Monet’s obsession with colour, light and shade was not just restricted to his more familiar landscapes but was used to dramatic effect on a wide series of paintings including the cityscapes of Paris, London and Venice.  Painting in the open air, Monet managed not only to capture the dramatic colour and light but the way the natural world seems to blend and co-exist with man-made structures.

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Shape of Light : 100 years of Photography and Abstract Art at Tate Modern – 2nd May to 14th October 2018

A major new exhibition at Tate Modern will reveal the intertwined stories of photography and abstract art. Shape of Light: 100 Years of Photography and Abstract Art will be the first show of this scale to explore photography in relation to the development of abstraction, from the early experiments of the 1910s to the digital innovations of the 21st century. Featuring over 300 works by more than 100 artists, the exhibition will explore the history of abstract photography side-by-side with iconic paintings and sculptures.

Shape of Light will place moments of radical innovation in photography within the wider context of abstract art, such as Alvin Langdon Coburn’s pioneering ‘vortographs’ from 1917. This relationship between media will be explored through the juxtaposition of works by painters and photographers, such as cubist works by George Braque and Pierre Dubreuil or the abstract expressionism of Jackson Pollock and Otto Steinert’s ‘luminograms’.  Abstractions from the human body associated with surrealism will include André Kertesz’s Distorsions, Imogen Cunningham’s Triangles and Bill Brandt’s Baie des Anges, Frances 1958, exhibited together with a major painting by Joan Miró. Elsewhere the focus will be on artists whose practice spans diverse media, such as László Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray.

The exhibition will also acknowledge the impact of MoMA’s landmark photography exhibition of 1960, The Sense of Abstraction. Installation photographs of this pioneering show will be displayed with some of the works originally featured in the exhibition, including important works by Edward Weston, Aaron Siskind and a series by Man Ray that has not been exhibited since the MoMA show, 58 years ago.

There will be rooms devoted to Op Art and Kinetic Art from the 1960s, featuring striking paintings by Bridget Riley and installations of key photographic works from the era by artists including Floris Neussis and Gottfried Jaeger. Rooms will also be dedicated to the minimal and conceptual practices of the 1970s and 80s. The exhibition will culminate in a series of new works by contemporary artists, Tony Cairns, Maya Rochat and Daisuke Yokota, exploring photography and abstraction today.

For more information or book tickets , visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE at the National Gallery from 15th March to 28th May 2018

The National Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE  which is part of an unprecedented collaboration between the National Portrait Gallery, the Royal Academy of Arts, and National Gallery, which will see all three galleries open distinct exhibitions with the artist Tacita Dean in 2018. The three exhibitions, Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE, PORTRAIT, STILL LIFE will be shaped by artist’s response to the individual character of each institution and explore genres traditionally associated with painting – landscape at the Royal Academy of Arts, portraiture at the National Portrait Gallery and still life at the National Gallery.

Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE provides the unusual situation that Dean acts as both artist and curator in this National Gallery exhibition. In the role of curator Dean brings together a diverse selections of works to explore the genre from 17th century paintings like Francisco de Zurbarán’s Cup of Water and a Rose (about 1630) to contemporary pieces in a variety of mediums, by the artist herself or by her contemporaries like Thomas Demand, Roni Horn and Wolfgang Tillmans.

Dean uses the exhibition to question some of the concepts of still life and examine its legacy within the history of art.

Dean illustrates that placing pictures together with some similarities in subject matter can convey very different meanings that change over time. Walter Sickert’s A Dead Hare  and John Craxton’s Hare on the Table (1944-45) illustrate that the symbolism of death and mortality prevalent in early paintings can be drastically changed in more modern interpretations.

Cy Twombly’s Bread (2004) sandwiched between two old interpretations of still life’s featuring bread is another example of how religious or cultural symbolism changes over time. 

Some works show that taking still life outdoors with a landscape behind can have a transforming effect. 

Dean contributes a new film diptych made especially for the exhibition, ‘Ideas for Sculpture in a Setting’, and ‘Prisoner Pair’ (2008, 16mm).

This small free fascinating exhibition offers the opportunity for visitors to question some of the fundamental concepts of ‘still life’. Dean suggests that the concept of still life is one that often changes over the history of art with associated symbolism part of the appeal of the genre. However it could be argued that the genre is open to more modern interpretations which can set the genre free, sometimes quite literally by taking the ‘still life’ outdoors into the landscape.

Visiting London Guide Rating –  Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here