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The Queen’s official residences to reopen to the public from 23 July 2020

 

The Royal Collection Trust have announced that Windsor Castle, the Palace of Holyroodhouse, the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace, and The Queen’s Galleries in London and Edinburgh, as well as Royal Collection Trust shops, will reopen to the public on Thursday, 23 July 2020.

To cater for the safety and wellbeing of visitors and staff, the attractions have introduced a number of measures to ensure that the Palaces, Galleries and shops can reopen safely and visitors can return with confidence.

These include:

The introduction of timed tickets at all sites in order to manage visitor numbers.

Visitors must book tickets in advance through http://www.rct.uk/tickets as capacities will be limited.

Markers and signs to help visitors maintain social distancing, with staff on hand to manage the flow of visitors in queuing areas and indoor spaces.

The introduction of one-way routes in some areas.

Hand sanitiser stations along the visitor routes.

Enhanced cleaning regimes.

Perspex screens at all till points, with payment by card only.

All front-of-house staff fully trained in COVID-secure procedures.

With these measures in place, Royal Collection Trust has acquired the ‘We’re Good to Go’ Industry Standard mark, recognised by VisitEngland and VisitScotland.

The Palaces, Galleries and shops will open five days a week for the foreseeable future, remaining closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The Café at the Palace of Holyroodhouse will also open five days a week, initially offering takeaway service only.

 

The Exhibition Programme at The Queen’s Galleries

The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

George IV: Art & Spectacle has been extended until 1 November 2020. The exhibition explores the life and collecting of arguably the most magnificent, and certainly the most flamboyant of British monarchs.

This will be followed by the new exhibition Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace, 11 December 2020 – February 2022, which brings together some of the most important paintings in the Royal Collection from the Picture Gallery at Buckingham Palace.

Japan: Courts and Culture, originally due to open in June 2020, is now expected to open in Spring 2022.

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse

Eastern Encounters: Four Centuries of Paintings and Manuscripts from the Indian Subcontinent, 23 July 2020 – 31 January 2021, presents the Royal Collection’s exceptional holdings of South Asian paintings and manuscripts.

This will be followed by Victoria & Albert: Our Lives in Watercolour, 5 March – 5 September 2021, exploring Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s enthusiastic collecting and commissioning of watercolour paintings to record their public and private lives.

 

Reopening dates and opening hours

Windsor Castle: From 23 July 2020, Thursday – Monday, 10:00 – 17:15 (last admission 16:00)

Palace of Holyroodhouse: From 23 July 2020, Thursday – Monday, 09:30 – 18:00 (last admission 16:30)

The Royal Mews, Buckingham Palace: From 23 July 2020, Thursday – Monday, 11:00 – 17:00 (last admission 16:00)

The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace: From 23 July 2020, Thursday – Monday, 11:00 – 18:30 (last admission 17:15)

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: From 23 July 2020, Thursday – Monday, 09:30 – 18:00 (last admission 17:00)

Revised exhibition programme

The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

George IV: Art & Spectacle: 23 July – 1 November 2020

Masterpieces from Buckingham Palace: 11 December 2020 – February 2022

The Queen’s Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse

Eastern Encounters: Four Centuries of Paintings and Manuscripts from the Indian Subcontinent: 23 July 2020 – 31 January 2021

Victoria & Albert: Our Lives in Watercolour: 5 March – 5 September 2021

The State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, Frogmore House and Clarence House will not open to the public this summer, owing to the operational challenges of social distancing.

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Tate to Reopen all its Galleries on 27 July 2020

Tate today announced that it plans to reopen all four of its galleries on 27 July 2020. People will once again be able to visit the national collection of art on display at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives.

Guided by the latest official advice, Tate is currently working hard on its preparations to welcome the public back to its galleries. To manage numbers and ensure everyone can keep a safe distance from each other, all visitors, including Members, will need to book a timed ticket online in advance. Tickets will be available from next week at tate.org.uk alongside the latest information and guidance on how to visit.

As well as the collection displays at all four Tate galleries, Tate Modern will reopen with Andy Warhol and Kara Walker’s Hyundai Commission Fons Americanus and Tate Britain will reopen with Aubrey Beardsley and Steve McQueen’s Year 3 installation.

As a result of the closure, some of Tate’s upcoming exhibition programme has been modified. This autumn, Tate Britain will open Turner’s Modern World and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, while Tate Modern will open Zanele Muholi and Bruce Nauman. Some exhibitions have been rescheduled to 2021, with new dates to be announced in due course. Talks, workshops, performances and film screenings will be replaced with a new programme of online events for the duration of this year.

TATE MODERN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

ANDY WARHOL
UNTIL 6 SEP 2020

HYUNDAI COMMISSION: KARA WALKER FONS AMERICANUS
UNTIL 8 NOV 2020

BRUCE NAUMAN
7 OCT 2020 – 21 FEB 2021

ZANELE MUHOLI
5 NOV 2020 – 14 MAR 2021

TATE BRITAIN EXHIBITION PROGRAMME

AUBREY BEARDSLEY
UNTIL 20 SEP 2020

STEVE MCQUEEN YEAR 3
UNTIL 31 JAN 2021

TURNER’S MODERN WORLD
28 OCT 2020 – 7 MAR 2021

LYNETTE YIADOM-BOAKYE
18 NOV 2020 – 9 MAY 2021

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Royal Academy to reopen to the public on Thursday 16 July 2020

The Royal Academy has announced that it will reopen to the public on Thursday 16 July. The RA has been closed for nearly 4 months due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

The RA will open in phases, initially for 4 days a week: Thursday to Sunday, 11am – 4pm and the exhibition, Picasso and Paper has been extended until Sunday 2 August.

The RA will be following government advice on health and safety as a minimum, with additional measures and standards also in place. This will include:

• Social distancing throughout the RA

• Compulsory wearing of a face covering for staff and visitors

• Multiple sanitisation stations throughout the RA

• Operating a cashless system

• Operating a one-way system throughout the building

Royal Academy Dates and Opening Hours

Early access for RA Friends: Thursday 9 – Sunday 12 July 2020
11am – 4pm daily (last admission 3.30pm)

Open to public: Thursday 16 July – Sunday 2 August 2020
Thursday to Sundays only

11am – 4pm daily (last admission 3.30pm)

Future phases of reopening beyond Sunday 2 August 2020, including opening dates and hours, will be confirmed in due course.

Exhibitions

Picasso and Paper
Main Galleries
Until 2 August 2020

Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
7 August – 18 October 2020

Summer Exhibition 2020
Main Galleries
6 October 2020 – 3 January 2021

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
15 November 2020 – 28 February 2021

Exhibition postponements

Marina Abramović: postponed until autumn 2021 (exact dates to be announced)
RA Schools Show 2020: postponed to June 2021(exact dates to be announced)

Exhibition cancellations

Angelica Kauffman
Cezanne: The Rock and Quarry Paintings

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The National Gallery to re-open on 8 July 2020

After an unprecedented 111 days with its doors closed, the National Gallery will start welcoming visitors again on Wednesday 8 July – the first major national art museum to reopen in the UK after the coronavirus shutdown.

The Gallery have made the decision to reopen based on government guidelines and have made some changes to the Gallery that make visitor and staff safety a priority. In line with best practice, all visits will be booked online and in advance. This is to help manage the number of people in the Gallery, limit queueing and reduce contact.

Entrance will be via the Sainsbury Wing Entrance and exit through the Getty Entrance; there will be 2m social distancing measures in place throughout the Gallery. As part of the new safety measures, three one-way art routes to guide visitors through different areas of the collection.

The acclaimed Titian: Love, Desire, Death exhibition, that had to close after just 3 days, will also reopen and has been extended until 17 January 2021. Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age has also been extended, until 20 September 2020.

In order to achieve an enhanced cleaning regime. The Gallery have installed higher efficiency filters in the air-conditioning system throughout the Gallery and are increasing the flow of fresh air. Perspex protection panels will be in place at Ticket and Information desks, along with the shop and café counters too, and there will be plenty of hand sanitizer at regular intervals throughout the building. For added reassurance that the National Gallery is a safe place to work and visit, the Gallery have provided personal protective equipment for our staff (including face masks, gloves and eye protection) and they are also recommending that all visitors wear a face covering during their visit.

The Gallery will still be open 7-days a week, there will be shorter opening hours to begin with (daily 11am-4pm, Friday 11am-9pm), and a reduced maximum capacity for visitors. The Getty Shop will be open, as will the National Café which will have a takeaway offer.

There are many exciting new things to see in the Gallery as it re-opens:

Room 32 – the Gallery’s largest and one of the most visited rooms displaying 17th-century Italian paintings by artists including Caravaggio, Artemisia and Orazio Gentileschi, Guido Reni and Guercino – will reopen after a 21-month refurbishment project, as the Julia and Hans Rausing Room.

• A number of newly-acquired paintings – Liotard’s The Lavergne Family Breakfast (1754), Gainsborough’s Portrait of Margaret Gainsborough holding a Theorbo (about 1777) and our very first Sorolla (The Drunkard, Zaraúz, 1910).

• The newly restored Equestrian Portrait of Charles I by Van Dyck (about 1637/8) will be back on show in Room 21 after more than two years. This monumental work (measuring 367 × 292.1 cm) has been off display since September 2017 undergoing conservation.

• Some new and ambitious hangs in the Dutch and British collections, including the two works by Turner (Dido building Carthage (1815) and Sun rising through Vapour (before 1807)) that are always hung together with A Seaport (1644) and The Mill (1648) by Claude in accordance with Turner’s will, relocated from Room 15 to the dramatic setting of the Barry Rooms.

Admission and tickets

There are three ways to book a visit at http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk

• Members go free to Titian and our other exhibitions

• Gallery entry + Titian (visit our 5-star Titian: Love, Desire, Death exhibition and see our collection)

• Gallery entry (a free ticket to see our collection and Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age)

Art routes

• Route A – See some of the earliest works in the collection including Botticelli, van Eyck, Leonardo, Memling, Michelangelo, Raphael, Piero and Uccello.

• Route B – Travel from Venice to the English countryside and see artists including Bronzino, Canaletto, Gainsborough, Hogarth, Holbein, Monet, Seurat, Turner and Van Gogh.

• Route C – Witness dramatic candlelit moments and contemplate serene interior scenes and see artist including Caravaggio, Rubens, Velázquez, Vermeer, Rembrandt, Monet, Seurat, Turner and Van Gogh.

A few rooms will not be open, in particular the smaller cabinet rooms.

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Disease X exhibition online version from the Museum of London

Like many other London museums, the Museum of London has shifted focus to bring first-class online content to visitors at home while our physical doors are closed. A primary strand of this digital programming is publishing objects and stories from some of the museum’s most popular exhibitions from both past and present. The latest instalment of this programme launches with the temporary exhibition Disease X: London’s next epidemic?, originally open between November 2018 and March 2019, now available online.

London, like the rest of the world has been affected in unprecedented ways by the current Covid-19 crisis, but it’s not the first time a virus has hit the capital. London has been affected by many epidemics and pandemics over the centuries including plague, cholera, smallpox, influenza and HIV/AIDS. The opening of Disease X in 2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the second and most deadly wave of the so-called ‘Spanish Flu’.

Using the Museum of London’s collections, new historical research and interviews with public health experts and epidemiologists the exhibition explored if the city might be at risk from an unknown ‘Disease X’ as the World Health Organisation called it.

The Disease X digital exhibition shares the stories, objects and words of the original display to demonstrate what the past can tell us about historical maladies, their impact on London and its people and the different methods used to fight back. Some of which include the mourning dress worn by Queen Victoria to mark the shock passing of her grandson Prince Albert Victor due to ‘Russian Flu’, a 17th century pomander used to waft away the foul smells thought to cause diseases like the plague and a poster advertising ‘Flu-Mal’, which dubiously claimed to combat both influenza and malaria.

This exhibition is an important reminder and puts into context that disease has been a constant part of the ‘London story’ and has led to a series of medical advances, the original exhibition asked the question, when would be the next epidemic ? Unfortunately we did not have to wait long with the arrival of the coronavirus.

If you would like further information, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Royal Academy of Arts Revised Exhibition Programme 2020

Following the temporary closure of the Royal Academy of Arts due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the exhibition programme for the remainder of 2020 has changed. Whilst the reopening date is still to be confirmed, the Royal Academy intends to:

Continue Léon Spilliaert throughout the summer to mid-September

Open Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection when the RA reopens, ending mid-October

Reschedule Summer Exhibition 2020 for the autumn, with a planned start in October 2020

Open Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul in early November 2020

Postpone the highly anticipated Marina Abramović exhibition until autumn 2021

Postpone Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist until 2021

Due to the closure, the Royal Academy of Arts has had to cancel two exhibitions:

Angelica Kauffman

Cezanne: The Rock and Quarry Paintings

The Royal Academy’s reopening date will be dependent upon government advice.

Exhibition Programme 2020

Léon Spilliaert

This is the first major exhibition of Belgian artist Léon Spilliaert (1881–1946) to be held in the UK. Bringing together around 80 works drawn from public and private collections across Belgium, France, Great Britain and the USA, the exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover this intriguing, singular artist who left an indelible mark on the twentieth century art of Belgium.

Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection

Gauguin and the Impressionists: Masterpieces from the Ordrupgaard Collection will showcase 60 works drawn from one of the finest collections of Impressionist paintings in northern Europe, assembled in the first decades of the twentieth century by wealthy Danish couple Wilhelm and Henny Hansen.

Summer Exhibition 2020

The Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show and has been held every year without interruption since 1769, even throughout the war years.

Tracey Emin/Edvard Munch: The Loneliness of the Soul

The Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of work by Tracey Emin RA, revealing her long-standing fascination with the artist Edvard Munch, of whom she states: ‘I’ve been in love with this man since I was eighteen’.

Exhibition Postponements

Marina Abramović
Postponed until autumn 2021 (exact dates to be announced)

In 2021 the Royal Academy of Arts will present a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed performance artist Marina Abramović Hon RA. The exhibition will be Abramović’s first major survey in the UK, bringing together over 50 works spanning her entire career.

Rita Angus: New Zealand Modernist
Postponed until 2021 (exact dates to be announced)

Rita Angus (1908 – 1970) is justly considered one of New Zealand’s most important early modern artists. She was a pioneer in celebrating the rich and powerful landscapes of the country in a bold new way.

Exhibition Cancellations

Unfortunately, due to the coronavirus pandemic the following 2020 exhibitions at the Royal Academy of Arts have been cancelled: Angelica Kauffman and Cezanne: The Rock and Quarry Paintings.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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BP Portrait Award 2020 Shorlist

Three artists have been shortlisted for the BP Portrait Award 2020, which will open as a virtual exhibition on Tuesday 5 May while the National Portrait Gallery, London is temporarily closed due to the current Coronavirus pandemic.

The three portraits in the running for the £35,000 First Prize are Night Talk by Jiab Prachakul; Portrait of Denis: Actor, Juggler and Fashion Model by Sergey Svetlakov and Labour of Love by Michael Youds. The shortlisted portraits were selected from 1,981 entries from 69 countries. It is the first time any of the artists have been shortlisted for the Award or selected for exhibition.

The prize winners will be announced on Tuesday 5 May on the National Portrait Gallery’s social media channels. All 48 works selected for the BP Portrait Award 2020 exhibition will be shown in a virtual gallery space that replicates the rooms of the National Portrait Gallery, enabling online visitors to view the portraits collectively, read the labels and get insights from the artists, as well as exploring each individual work in more detail. The popular Visitor’s Choice feature, which offers the public the opportunity to vote for their favourite portrait will also run online.

The BP Portrait Award 2020 exhibition was originally due to open at the National Portrait Gallery on the 21 May 2020, but has been postponed following the Gallery’s temporary closure to help prevent the spread of Coronavirus and ensure the safety and wellbeing of visitors and staff. It is not yet known if the exhibition will be able to be shown at the Gallery before building works begin on Inspiring People, the Gallery’s major redevelopment project, at the end of June.

Shortlisted artists:

Night Talk by Jiab Prachakul, 2019 © Jiab Prachakul

Jiab Prachakul for Night Talk (1000 × 1000mm, acrylic on canvas)

Jiab Prachakul was born in in 1979 in Nakhon Phanom, a small town on the Mekong River in northeast Thailand. She studied filmography at Thammasat University before working as a casting director at a Bangkok production company, finding talent for advertising campaigns. In 2006, Prachakul relocated to London where she had the ‘instant realisation’ that she wanted to be an artist after viewing a David Hockney retrospective at the National Portrait Gallery. Entirely self-taught, she moved to Berlin in 2008 and began selling her pictures at a local flea market and set up an online fashion brand, designing merchandise based on her artworks, which she continues to run from her current home in Lyon.

Portrait of Denis: Actor, Juggler and Fashion Model by Sergey Svetlakov, 2019 © Sergey Svetlakov

Sergey Svetlakov for Portrait of Denis: Actor, Juggler and Fashion Model (508 × 407mm, Oil on canvas)

Sergey Svetlakov was born in 1961 in Kazan, the capital city of what is now the Republic of Tatarstan in the Russian Federation. He graduated from the Kazan Art School, one of the oldest in Russia, before studying set design at the Theatre Academy in St Petersburg where he continues to live and work. His early career was spent designing sets and costumes for operas and stage productions. In the early 1990s, he gave up working in theatre to devote all his energies to his portraiture, nude studies and still life, and he has since exhibited widely across Europe, the US and Japan.

Labour of Love by Michael Youds, 2019 © Michael Youds

Michael Youds for Labour of Love (1400 × 1000mm, Oil on canvas)

Born in 1982 in Blackburn, Lancashire, Michael Youds gained a first-class degree in Fine Art from Lancaster University before moving to Edinburgh in 2006. Youds works as a gallery attendant at the National Galleries of Scotland, he is also an award-winning artist in his own right and devotes most of his free time to painting portraits and still life at his studio in the city. His work has been selected for exhibition at the Royal Scottish Academy and the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. In 2019, he won first prize in the Scottish Portrait Awards for a painting of him and his twin brother David, who is also an artist.

The Portrait Award is an annual event aimed at encouraging artists to focus on and develop the theme of portraiture in their work. The competition is open to everyone aged eighteen and over, in recognition of the outstanding and innovative work currently being produced by artists of all ages.

One of the most important platforms for portrait painters, the Award has a first prize of £35,000, making it one of the largest for any global arts competition. The winner also receives, at the Gallery’s discretion, a commission worth £7,000 (agreed between the National Portrait Gallery and the artist). The second winner receives £12,000 and a third prize of £10,000 is also awarded. The BP Young Artist Award, with a prize of £9,000 goes to one selected artist aged between 18 and 30.

BP Travel Award 2019

The winner of the BP Travel Award 2019 was Manu Saluja for her proposal to create portraits of volunteers working in the vast communal kitchen at The Golden Temple in Amritsar, India. The resulting work will be displayed online in the BP Portrait Award 2020 exhibition.

For more information, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Titian: Love Desire Death at the National Gallery from 16 March to 14 June 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Titian’s epic series of large-scale mythological paintings, known as the poesie, are brought together in its entirety for the first time since the late 16th century at the National Gallery. The series was painted between about 1551 and 1562 and are considered some of the most original visual interpretations of Classical myth for their rich, expressive and colourful rendition.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

From the original cycle of six paintings, the exhibition reunites Danaë (1551–3, The Wellington Collection, Apsley House); Venus and Adonis (1554, Prado, Madrid); Diana and Actaeon (1556–9) and Diana and Callisto (1556–9), jointly owned by the National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland; and the recently conserved Rape of Europa (1562) from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Following its landmark decision to lend works on a temporary basis for the first time in its 119-year history, the Wallace Collection has loaned its painting from the cycle, Perseus and Andromeda, (1554–6), to the exhibition in Trafalgar Square.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The National Gallery’s Death of Actaeon (1559–75), originally conceived as part of the series, but only executed much later and never delivered, is also displayed.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All the paintings illustrate Titian’s remarkable talent to create a narrative in which mythological scenes contain a whole range of very human emotions like love, desire, guilt, surprise, shame, desperation, anguish, and terror. The paintings depict stories primarily drawn from the Roman poet Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Because Titian considered the paintings similar to poetry, he called them his ‘poesie’. The series was commissioned by Philip II of Spain and consolidated Titian’s reputation as one of the most famous painters of his period.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Titian’s six poesie for Philip II of Spain have had an incredible history, two remained in Madrid, Spain: Danaë and Venus and Adonis. Danaë remained longer, but was taken by Joseph Bonaparte in 1813 and seized by Wellington in the Battle of Vitoria, after which it came to England. Venus and Adonis was also in England, as Titian sent it to Philip when he was in London, having just married Mary Tudor (1516–58). The other four, Perseus and Andromeda, Rape of Europa, Diana and Callisto, and Diana and Actaeon, plus the unfinished The Death of Actaeon, passed by different routes into the collection of Philippe II, Duc d’Orléans (1674–1723). When this collection was auctioned in London in 1798, the five poesie were divided but remained in British collections throughout the 19th century. Perseus and Andromeda was unsold at the first sale, and then changed hands before being sold at the second Duc d’Orléans sale in 1805.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 1896 Rape of Europa was sold to Isabella Stewart Gardner for her collection in Boston, USA. Perseus and Andromeda was secured for Britain the following year as part of the Wallace Collection bequest. In 1972, when The Death of Actaeon was offered for sale, the National Gallery successfully purchased the painting with the help of government funds and following a nationwide public appeal. In 2009, the National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland jointly acquired Diana and Actaeon; and in 2012, Diana and Callisto, securing the last two of these masterpieces for the public.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This remarkable exhibition is a once in a lifetime opportunity to view in one room, Titian’s six poesie for Philip II of Spain painted in the mid 16th century. That all six paintings have survived the vagaries of war, destruction and political turmoil over four centuries is a miracle in itself and the small intimate exhibition provides a wonderful opportunity to study the paintings in some detail. Titian is one of those rare artists who was not only famous in his own time but has retained his reputation over the centuries, this exhibition illustrates why he is considered one of the most important artists in the history of European painting.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Andy Warhol at Tate Modern from 12 March to 6 September 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents an exhibition which features the work of Andy Warhol (1928–87), the exhibition is the first at the gallery for almost 20 years and explores the man behind the image.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features over 100 works from across his career and provides some insights into how Warhol’s personal experiences led to his unique take on American 20th century culture.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Born Andrew Warhola, he grew up in Pittsburgh to parents who emigrated from a small village in the north-east of the former Czechoslovak Republic. The Warhola family were devout followers of the Byzantine Ruthenian Catholic Church, and the impact of the strong religious conviction of his mother Julia Warhola especially on the artist is considered an important influence in his life. The exhibition also examines how Warhol’s sexuality influenced his work starting with a selection of his evocative early line drawings of male portraits and nudes from the 1950s.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Both in personality and sexuality, Warhol considered himself an outsider and was attracted to those on the margins of American society.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of his early works is the film Sleep 1963 which documents Warhol’s lover at the time.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Warhol is best known for his iconic paintings of Campbell Soup cans, Coca-Cola bottles and Marilyn Monroe prints which provided an unique take on American consumerism and culture. Key works from the pop period are included the exhibition, such as Marilyn Diptych 1962, Elvis I and II 1963/1964 and Race Riot 1964.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is also a recreation of the psychedelic multimedia environment of Exploding Plastic Inevitable 1966, originally produced for the Velvet Underground rock shows.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors will also be able to experience Warhol’s floating Silver Clouds 1966 installation, initially meant to signal his ‘retirement’ from painting in favour of moviemaking.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It was around this time that Warhol set up the Factory and became interested in underground filmmaking, between 1963 to 1967, Warhol and his collaborators made around 500 films that generally featured the various personalities that spent their time in the Factory.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Following his shooting by Valerie Solanas in 1968, Warhol returned to large-scale painting projects and the exhibition includes the largest grouping of his 1975 Ladies and Gentlemen series ever shown in the UK. These striking portraits depict figures from New York’s transgender community.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition ends with one of Warhol’s final works from the 80s,the poignant Sixty Last Suppers 1986 on view at Tate Modern for the first time in this country which is said to reflect how the HIV/AIDS epidemic impacted on the lives of many in his close circle.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Perhaps one of the more bizarre exhibits is three of Warhol’s wigs on loan from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition explores the multilayered world of Andy Warhol who charted the immense social, political and technological change of America by creating works of art that mirrored some of the methods of American consumerism. However, the exhibition does illustrate that Warhol had a particular affection for those ‘outsiders’ who were finding their own desires, identity and belief. Warhol was not only recording his own period, he was providing a glimpse of the future where art becomes part of the mainstream consumer society and many people would seek to have their ’15 minutes of fame.’

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
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Golden ‘bulla’ dazzles the British Museum

Photograph © British Museum

It has been called ‘one of the most significant discoveries from this period, the Bronze age or first age of metal, to be made in Britain for more than a century. The remakable brilliantly decorated sun pendant illustrates the importance of sun worship, 3,000 years years ago.

Photograph © British Museum

The sun pendant, 3.6cm high and 4.7cm wide, dating from is only the second ever found in Britain. The other was lost in the 19th century, although six similar but not identical gold pendants have been found in Ireland.

Photograph © British Museum

This type of pendant is known as a ‘bulla’, after the Latin word for bubble. A bulla is a large hollow pendant made of sheet gold which would have been suspended and probably worn as adornment. The contents of the hollow pendant from Shropshire remain a mystery and are the subject of on-going analysis by scientists at the British Museum.

Photograph © British Museum

The pendant is one of a small number of contemporary, precious objects made to celebrate the religious and sacred aspect of the sun during the Bronze Age. They have been found across Europe, including the famous Trundholm Sun Chariot from Denmark and the ‘sun discs’ of North-West Europe.

Photograph © British Museum

A metal detectorist in Shropshire in 2018, found the astonishingly well-preserved gold pendant decorated on all its shimmering surfaces with semi-circles and geometric motifs. One side shows a stylized sun, solar symbolism is a key element of Bronze Age cosmology and mythology across Europe, but before the discovery of this pendant was very rarely seen on objects found in Britain. The pendant was reported to the local Finds Liaison Officer for Shropshire & Herefordshire, who notified the Coroner and brought it to the British Museum under the Treasure process. The Coroner found the bulla to be ‘Treasure and the independent Treasure Valuation Committee recommended a value of a quarter of a million pounds to the Secretary of State. In light of the significance of the object, the British Museum was keen to acquire it and with support from Art Fund and the American Friends of the British Museum the pendant has now entered the collection.

Photograph © British Museum

When it is shown at the British Museum the pendant will be displayed near to other famous Bronze Age objects such as the Mold Gold Cape, which was found relatively close to where the pendant was discovered. Both are witness to the artistic skill and ingenuity of the period, challenging preconceptions that deep history was an ‘uncivilised’ or ‘unskilled’ time.

Before it is displayed at the British Museum, the Shropshire Marches Bulla will go to the Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery for its’ first public display later this year.

For more information, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here