Home » Exhibitions

Category Archives: Exhibitions

Advertisements

Mantegna and Bellini at the National Gallery – 1st October 2018 to 27th January 2019

In autumn 2018, the National Gallery will present a tale of two artists, their families and their cities; an interlinked story of art, family, rivalry, marriage, pragmatism, and personality – Mantegna and Bellini.

This exhibition is the first ever devoted to the relationship between two of the greatest artists of the Italian Renaissance: Giovanni Bellini (active about 1459–1516) and Andrea Mantegna (1430/1–1506). Through exceptionally rare loans of paintings, drawings, and sculpture, travelling to London from across the world, Mantegna and Bellini offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to compare the work of these two important artists who also happened to be brothers-in-law.

Neither’s career or artistic development would have existed without the other, and without these works imbued with their creativity and innovation, Renaissance art, by the likes of Titian, Correggio, and Veronese, would not exist as it does today.

The son of a carpenter, Andrea Mantegna was a self-made man. In 1453 the prodigiously talented young painter from Padua, married into the greatest artistic family of nearby Venice – the Bellini. Mantegna’s new brother-in-law, Giovanni Bellini, was also a gifted artist who was bringing new innovations to the Venetian use of colour, observed light, atmosphere, and landscape to create an entirely new form of art. Their admiration and respect were mutual.

For seven years Mantegna and Bellini worked in close creative dialogue – something visitors to the exhibition will be able to observe at first hand through key groupings of subjects both artists portrayed. Inspired by each other’s example, they both experimented and worked in ways they were not entirely comfortable with in order to hone their artistic skills and identities. While Mantegna exemplified the intellectual artist, Bellini was the archetypal landscape painter, the first to use the natural world to convey emotion.

In 1460, Mantegna decided to pursue his own artistic path and moved to Mantua, where he occupied the post of court painter to the ruling Gonzaga family until his death in 1506. Bellini, who died 10 years after Mantegna, spent his entire career in Republican Venice.  Despite the distance between them, their creative exchange continued throughout their long lives. Each artist continued to scale new heights in skill and ingenuity but remained forever shaped by their time together and by the knowledge of the other’s work and achievements.

At the core of the exhibition are two historic juxtapositions of Mantegna and Bellini’s work: depictions of The Agony in the Garden, (Mantegna’s about 1458-60, Bellini’s’ about 1465) which have hung side by side in the National Gallery since the late 19th century, as well as two paintings of The Presentation of Christ to the Temple (Mantegna’s version of which is in the Gemäldegalerie, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin) and Bellini’s in the Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Venice).

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Advertisements

The Victoria and Albert Museum announces largest ever Christian Dior exhibition in the UK from 2nd February to 14th July 2019


Yves Saint Laurent in front of Christian Dior London, 11th November 1958. © Popperfoto, Getty Images

In February 2019, the V&A will open the largest and most comprehensive exhibition ever staged in the UK on the House of Dior – the museum’s biggest fashion exhibition since Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty in 2015.

Spanning 1947 to the present day, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams will trace the history and impact of one of the 20th century’s most influential couturiers, and the six artistic directors who have succeeded him, to explore the enduring influence of the fashion house.

Écarlate afternoon dress, Autumn-Winter 1955 Haute Couture collection, Y line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Based on the major exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve, organised by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, the exhibition will be reimagined for the V&A. A brand-new section will, for the first time, explore the designer’s fascination with British culture. Dior admired the grandeur of the great houses and gardens of Britain, as well as British-designed ocean liners, including the Queen Mary. He also had a preference for Savile Row suits. In 1947, he hosted his first UK fashion show at London’s Savoy Hotel, and in 1952 established Christian Dior London. This exhibition will investigate Dior’s creative collaborations with influential British manufacturers, and his most notable British clients, from author Nancy Mitford to ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn.

A highlight will be the Christian Dior dress worn by Princess Margaret for her 21st birthday celebrations, generously on loan from the Museum of London. It will also bring to life Dior’s spectacular fashion shows staged in the UK’s most luxurious stately homes, including Blenheim Palace in 1954.

Pérou short evening dress, Autumn-Winter 1954 Haute Couture collection, H line. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Gift of Cecil Beaton. Photo © Laziz Hamani

Drawn from the extensive Dior Archives, the exhibition will also showcase highlights from the V&A’s world-class Couture collections, including the iconic Bar Suit, gifted to the museum by the House of Dior in 1960. The exhibition will present over 500 objects, with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, perfume, make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions.

The exhibition will highlight Dior’s vision of femininity, encompassing garments, accessories and fragrances. Flowers are emblematic of the Couture House and have inspired silhouettes, embroidery and prints but also the launch of Miss Dior in 1947, the first fragrance created alongside the very first show.

From horticulture to global travel and 18th century decorative arts, the show will reveal the sources of inspiration that defined the House of Dior’s aesthetic. From the daring designs of Yves Saint Laurent to the rational style of Marc Bohan, the flamboyance of Gianfranco Ferré, the exuberance of John Galliano, the minimalism of Raf Simons, and Maria Grazia Chiuri’s feminist vision of fashion, the exhibition will show how each successive artistic director has stayed true to Dior’s vision of Haute Couture, while bringing their own creative sensibilities to the House.

The exhibition Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams runs from 2 February – 14 July 2019. Tickets will go on sale in Autumn 2018.

For more information , visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review: Life in the Dark at the Natural History Museum – 13th July 2018 to 6th January 2019

The Natural History Museum presents a new exhibition entitled Life in the Dark which explores the darkest corners of our world to find the remarkable animals that flourish in conditions that humans would struggle to survive.

The exhibition begins with a large animated display that invites visitors to recognise a familiar nocturnal world populated by owls, foxes and badgers. Unusually a number of the exhibits are there for people to touch and feel. Underlying the exhibition is how creatures have developed extraordinary senses and behaviours in order to survive and thrive in the dark.

Many will be familiar with some of the strategies that woodland creatures use to hunt at night especially bats use of echo location, however as you progress into the exhibition you descend into the more unfamiliar nocturnal worlds of caves, deep seas and oceans.

The exhibition recreates a bat cave with its distinctive aromas and sounds. It is within caves that hundreds of incredible creatures, some brand new to science have been discovered. This has been made possible with technological advances in diving equipment and knowledge of some of the most remote caves.

One of the highlights of the exhibition are live Mexican blind cave fish that have evolved other senses, so don’t need eyes to navigate. Film footage illustrates that cave diving can be very dangerous as recent events in Thailand have shown.

Technology has also played a part in allowing devices to descend deeper and deeper into the deep sea. Video screens show remarkable footage of unusual creatures including the rather comical Dumbo octopus.

At these depths, the use of light is often used to attract prey or fight off predators, one of the last galleries offers a bioluminescence display that recreates some of the extraordinary light displays that can be found in the dark abyss.

The final room brings visitors up to date with some of the latest research regarding creatures that have been discovered in the deep which is providing some answers  into their strategies and behaviour.

This fascinating exhibition takes the visitors into the shadowy nocturnal worlds of the natural world. Using innovative installations, multimedia footage and specimens, the exhibition illustrates the astounding diversity of the natural world in areas that are often off limits to human beings. It is only recently that some of the secrets of the deep have been discovered and the exhibition provides some real insights into the exciting developments in this area.

Life in the Dark has been designed to be as interactive as possible and appeal to both adults and families, the exhibition is free for children 16 years and under with an adult.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the National History Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cezanne at the National Gallery – 17th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

For the first time since 1948 the National Gallery will display major Impressionist paintings from the Courtauld Gallery alongside works from its own collections.

This exciting exhibition is made possible thanks to a major loan of works from the Courtauld Gallery, which is closing in September 2018 for a redevelopment. 

Opening at the National Gallery this autumn, Courtauld Impressionists: From Manet to Cézanne will trace the development of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings through a wide ranging survey of over 40 masterpieces from Daumier to Bonnard.

As well as providing the perfect introduction to this art movement, the exhibition will focus on the vision of the Courtauld’s founder Samuel Courtauld. It will focus on his role in shaping national collections and paving the way for the acceptance of modern art in the United Kingdom.

Having purchased works from the first Impressionist exhibition, Samuel Courtauld went on to build one of the world’s most important art collections but stopped acquiring paintings after the death of his wife, revealing a strong emotional connection to the works. 

Highlights from the Courtauld’s collection will include Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergére, Cézanne’s The Card Players and Man with a Pipe, Toulouse-Lautrec’s Jane Avril in the Entrance to the Moulin Rouge, putting on her Gloves, Renoir’s La Loge and Seurat’s Young Woman Powdering Herself.

The exhibition unites these works with those the National Gallery acquired in the 1920s through Samuel Courtauld’s fund, such as Cézanne’s Self Portrait, Pissarro’s The Boulevard Montmartre at Night, Renoir’s At the Theatre (La Première Sortie) and Seurat’s Bathers at Asnières. This exhibition is a collaboration between the Courtauld Gallery and National Gallery.

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Michael Jackson: On the Wall at the National Portrait Gallery – 28 June to 21 October 2018


The National Portrait Gallery presents a new exhibition entitled Michael Jackson: On the Wall which explores how Michael Jackson has inspired some of the leading names in contemporary art. This major exhibition spanning several generations of artists across all media coincides with what would have been Michael Jackson’s 60th birthday (on August 29, 2018).

While Jackson is considered one of the most iconic cultural figures of the 20th century for his music, videos, dance, choreography and fashion, his impact on contemporary art is less well-known and is the focus for this exhibition.

The Michael Jackson: On the Wall exhibition brings together the works of over 40 artists, drawn from public and private collections around the world, some of the artists featured include : Maggi Hambling, David LaChapelle, Catherine Opie, Yan Pei Ming, Grayson Perry, Donald Urquhart, Kehinde Wiley, Andy Warhol and many more

As you enter the exhibition, visitors can see a Michael Jackson representation by Keith Waring before Kehinde Wiley’s Equestrian portrait of King Phillip ( Michael Jackson) perhaps making a statement that the ways that Kings of history and Kings of Pop are projected have some similarity.

David LaChappelle takes this worship further with Jackson featured in a number of religious poses.

A series of videos show Michael Jackson in performance which provides evidence of his innovative live shows and music. However this is only one part of why Jackson fascinates artists and the exhibition asks why so many contemporary artists have been drawn to Jackson as a subject.

One of first artists drawn to Jackson’s iconic status was Andy Warhol who created images in his famous pop art style. A room in this exhibition explores this relationship between Warhol and Jackson.

A large cut out of Mark Ryden’s Dangerous from 1991 takes visitors from one part of the exhibition to another section which includes Michael Jackson’s remarkable ‘dinner jacket’ by Michael Lee Bush and Sex and Drugs and Earthenware by Grayson Perry.

With so many portraits of Jackson, we can see how he changed his appearance dramatically over the years and how his ‘persona’ became more complex as he grew older.

Many iconic figures of the 20th century had a self-destructive streak like Marilyn Monroe and James Dean, Michael Jackson’s story was not quite so simple with a number of issues that tarnished and challenged his reputation.

It is this ‘fallen idol’ stage that often attracts artists like Maggie Hambling who captures Jackson when he was facing charges about ‘child abuse’.

This exhibition is like its subject matter, entertaining but a little bizarre, the reality of a child star who became one of the most famous musical artists in the world has often been subsumed by myth and legend. Therefore it may not be a surprise that artists often portray Jackson as a mythical figure in mythical settings.

This exhibition may be a celebration of Michael Jackson artistic endeavours but provides some evidence of the dark underbelly of fame. It is this light and dark that seems to fascinate contemporary artists and the wider public, this exhibition is likely to be very popular and it may be worth booking in advance.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Bluecoats in the City: 350 Years of Christ’s Hospital at the Museum of London – 12 July to 7 October 2018


The Museum of London presents a new display, Bluecoats in the City, which explores the story behind The City of London’s first orphanage and school, Christ’s Hospital.

In 1546, the former buildings and church of Greyfriars monastery in Newgate Street were given to the City of London for the benefit of the poor, elderly and sick. The buildings were used to establish Christ’s Hospital; founded in 1552 for the education of poor children. The School became known as the ‘Bluecoat School’ because of its distinctive uniform of navy coats and yellow stockings.

Since opening, Christ’s Hospital has now educated, lodged, fed and clothed more than 45,000 children, thanks to donations from the City of London and charitable benefactors. In 1902 the School moved from the City to the market town of Horsham. However its strong bonds to The City of London remain.

The Museum of London’s new free display, Bluecoats in the City, allows visitors a chance to discover more about the school and delves into the history behind the School’s creation, its iconic uniform, historic practices, charitable benefactors, and some of its famous pupils including Charles Lamb and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

If you would like further information, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review – Vanessa Winship: And Time Folds at the Barbican Art Gallery from 22nd June to 2nd September 2018

The Barbican Art Gallery present the first major UK solo exhibition of British contemporary photographer Vanessa Winship. The acclaimed photographer was the recipient of the prestigious Henri Cartier-Bresson Award in 2011 and this exhibition features over 150 photographs by Winship, many of which have never been seen before in the UK, as well as a collection of unseen archival material.

Vanessa Winship lived and worked in the region of the Balkans, Turkey and the Caucasus for more than a decade exploring  ideas around concepts of borders, land, memory, identity and history.

Her two major series Imagined States and Desires: A Balkan Journey (1999–2003) and Black Sea: Between Chronicle and Fiction (2002–2006) explored some of her concepts on the frontiers of Eastern Europe. Many of these areas were coming to terms with the fall of the communist states and conflicts alongside ethnic and political lines. Winship often shows that these major transitions have a considerable impact on individual’s identity and their relationship with the local landscapes.  

Another series, Sweet Nothings (2007) show portraits of school girls from Turkey, Winship’s formal portraits draws the attention to the the affectionate messages or ‘sweet nothings’ which are embroidered on their lace collar or bodice of their uniforms.

Winship’s award of Henri Cartier-Bresson Award in 2011 which enabled her to undertake a new photographic series in the United States. She dances on Jackson (2011–2012) is a series photographs made at the time of economic recession and decline of many  American industries. In similar ways to the Balkan series, these pictures show how individuals come with economic and political decline.

A similar theme is illustrated in the series Humber (2010) in which the photographer explores the area close to where she was born.

Winship goes back to Eastern Europe with her series Georgia: Seeds Carried by the Wind (2008–2010), Winship finds a country where the people are struggling to come to terms with the post-Soviet economic collapse.

To coincide with the exhibition, Winship has conceived a new photographic series, And Time Folds (2014-ongoing) which includes a number of objects and represent something of a departure from previous series.

This interesting and thought provoking exhibition explores the often the fragile nature of individual’s relationships with their landscape and wider society. Winship illustrates how much we are tied to our collective and individual histories and how conflict and ideological changes can lead to severe strains on our identities.

Vanessa Winship: And Time Folds runs at the same time as the Dorothea Lange: Politics of Seeing exhibition.  

A ticket gains entry to both exhibitions.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here