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Exhibition Review – George IV: Art and Spectacle at the Queen’s Gallery from 15 November 2019 to 3 May 2020

The Queen’s Gallery presents an exhibition about George IV (1762–1830) who built up a remarkable collection of works of art and remodelled Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, built the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and influenced the architectural development of London with the laying out of Regent Street and Regent’s Park.

However, despite these achievements, for much of his reign, George IV was intensely disliked by a nation tired of his extravagant lifestyle. The exhibition entitled George IV: Art & Spectacle explores different aspects of the king’s complex character in a period of considerable political and social turmoil. Although George ruled as Regent from 1811, because of the decline in the mental health of his father, George III. It was when he came to the throne in 1820, aged 57, that he began to be more often portrayed as a rotund, gout-ridden, drunken buffoon and continued to be lampooned by the satirists of the day for his marriage to Princess Caroline of Brunswick and his many mistresses.

At the beginning of the exhibition is a number of prints from Thomas Rowlandson and other satirists which portray George as a man chasing his desires whilst the country faced social and political turmoil. Despite the King’s efforts to suppress the more hostile images with legal action, he met with little success.

One of George’s favourite pastimes were equestrian and the exhibition features a portrait of George IV, when Prince of Wales in 1791 by George Stubbs.

As Prince of Wales, George lived at Carlton House on London’s Pall Mall where he had run up debts of estimated £400,000 (around £31 million today). One of the highlights of the exhibition is a series of works he collected of 17th-century Dutch and Flemish painters. The works include The Passage Boat by Aelbert Cuyp c1650, A woman at her Toilet by Jan Steen 1663, and Rembrandt’s The Shipbuilder and his Wife, 1633.

After the French Revolution, the market was flooded with works of art that had belonged to the French aristocracy. George acquired some of the finest examples of 18th-century French decorative arts, including bronzes, furniture and Sèvres porcelain. Some of these examples are featured throughout the exhibition.

The King was among the leading patrons of British artists of the day, favouring the work of Sir Thomas Lawrence, Sir Joshua Reynolds and Richard Cosway. In 1784, he commissioned Sir Thomas Gainsborough to paint his three eldest sisters, the Princesses Charlotte, Augusta and Elizabeth, and after the artist’s death purchased Gainsborough’s only surviving mythological painting, Diana and Actaeon, c.1785–8.

George IV’s coronation at Westminster Abbey was a great theatrical production that cost of £240,000. The exhibition provides evidence of this lavish occasion with his elaborate coronation robes and the Diamond Diadem, made for the occasion by the goldsmiths Rundell, Bridge & Rundell and spectacular dining and buffet silver-gilt.

In contrast to images that painted him a negative light, George IV tried to portray himself as a player on the European political stage. When Napoleon Bonaparte abdication in 1814, George invited several of the allied leaders and commanders to London, and commissioned Britain’s pre-eminent portraitist, Sir Thomas Lawrence, to paint them. The paintings were later installed in the purpose-built Waterloo Chamber at Windsor Castle and a number are on display in the exhibition.

Although, George never travelled beyond Europe, he amassed a large collection of artefacts from around the world, some which are featured in the exhibition including Asian porcelain, a red and yellow feather cape (‘ahu’ula) from King Kamehameha II and Queen Kamamalu of the Sandwich Islands (now Hawaii), and a First Nations coat of caribou skin. His collection of arms and armour covered almost every part of the world, from a Maori club brought from Hawaii by Captain Cook’s ship Resolution, to a Persian sabre and a samurai sword.

The exhibition also features a selection of books from George’s IV’s Carlton House library, including a copy of Emma sent to him by Jane Austen’s publisher following the writer’s visit to the royal residence.

This fascinating and decorative exhibition offers the opportunity to view some of the finest works of art in the Royal Collection and consider the complex character of one of the most divisive monarchs in the last 250 years. It is ironic in an age where the monarchy is generally respected that we are reminded that this was not always the case. The stunning collection presented in the exhibition was built up by a king that seemed to think that public funds were there for his own personal use. Whilst visitors may admire this collection, few will admire the man behind the collection.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
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Exhibition Review- Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits at the Royal Academy from 27 October 2019 to 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits is the first exhibition to focus on the artist’s self-portraits, the works covering almost seven decades provide a remarkable opportunity to chart Freud’s (1922-2011) artistic development. The exhibition brings together around 50 works, many from private collections and a number have not been seen publicly for several decades.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lucian Freud is considered as one of the foremost 20th century British painters, he was the grandson of Sigmund Freud and arrived in Britain in 1933 after leaving Germany to escape the rise of Nazism. Freud moved to London in 1943 and over the next few years he became closely involved with the London arts scene, and formed a close friendship with fellow artist Francis Bacon.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The start of the exhibition contrasts his first major self-portrait, Man with a Feather, 1943 alongside his late work Self-portrait, Reflection, 2002.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The second section at Freud’s explores his early works, including his drawings and sketchbooks. They reveal that Freud uses his own self-image in a playful way with the mythological guise of Actaeon (Self-portrait with Antlers), 1949 and as a character in illustrations for plays and stories such as Flyda and Arvid, 1947.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Freud’s work from the 1950s began to take his self portraits and painting much more seriously illustrated by Hotel Bedroom, 1954 and Self Portrait 1956.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Unusually, Freud often used mirrors to capture his self image which allowed him to change his perspective which is seen in Hand Mirror on Chair, 1966 and Interior with Hand Mirror (Self portrait), 1967.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The 1980s and 1990s saw Freud’s artistic reputation rising in the UK and internationally and his work gained a self assurance and a new honesty,

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Reflection (Self-portrait), 1985 possesses the penetrating stare for which Freud was famous. In 1993, Freud completed Painter Working, Reflection, 1993 which exposes his ageing body, depicting himself naked but for a pair of boots.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The section entitled Reflections in the Studio show Freud’s portraits of other people, including a large scale painting of his son, Freddy Standing, 2000-1.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Some of the final self-portraits, show the artist now in his 80s, world weary but defiant his face gaunt and built up with thick layers of paint.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although many artists have portrayed their life’s journey in self portraits, Freud has an unusual relationship with his self image. He stated that “ I don’t accept the information that I get when I look at myself and that’s where the trouble starts” and ” I am not very introspective but I was very shy, so I tried to overcome it by being exhibitionistic.”

This fascinating exhibition explores these contradictions in Freud’s self portraits, the viewer traces the artist’s life from his youthful playfulness to the sombre reflections of ageing. Strangely considering his family connections, Freud is more concerned with the physical than the psychological. Known as an intensely private man, it is his portraits which are the vehicle that exposes him to the world outside his studio.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review: Bridget Riley at the Hayward Gallery from 23 October 2019 to 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Hayward Gallery presents a major retrospective exhibition devoted to the work of acclaimed British artist Bridget Riley, spanning 70 years of the artist’s working life. Bridget Riley at the Hayward Gallery is the largest and most comprehensive exhibition of her work to date and runs from 23 October 2019 to 26 January 2020.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bridget Riley achieved an international reputation for her pioneering works that explored the nature of abstraction and perception. In the 1960s, her iconic black-and-white paintings became associated with the emerging Op Art movement. Riley won the International Prize for Painting at the XXXIV Venice Biennale in 1968 and was the feature of a 1971 exhibition at the Hayward Gallery entitled Bridget Riley: Paintings and Drawings 1951-71. This exhibition includes over 200 works and 50 key paintings, it also features several large canvases that have seldom been seen in this country.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition starts in the Upper Galleries with ‘Beginnings’ which includes some of her early works before she moved into abstraction. Riley was influenced by the work of Bonnard, Matisse and Paul Klee and used drawing as a key component in finding out how to organise visual information.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

An illustration of how Riley decoded others work is the section called ‘Looking at Seurat’, Riley made a study of Seurat’s painting The Bridge at Courbevoie in 1959. Rather than just a reproduction, she followed Seurat’s method in relation to colour, light and contrast.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

By the beginning of the 1960s, Riley was ready to follow her own path with her Black and White series which includes Kiss, (1961), Movement in Squares, (1961) and Blaze 1, (1962). Riley seemed to have tapped into the spirit of the times and her work was acclaimed by critics and the public in the UK and internationally.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the mid 1960s, Riley began to move on with ‘Curves’ with Drift 2 (1966) and towards the full use of colour in Aubade, (1975), Clepsydre (1976) and Streak 2 (1979).

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Riley’s experimentation continued in the 1970s with ‘Stripes and Diagonals’, the use of colour became more complex and diagonal lines are used to break up the stripes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Since the 1980s, Riley has experimented and refined her approach with a series of works, the unique nature of the Hayward Gallery, with its large spaces allow the installation of several key wall works (Composition with Circles 4, 2004, Rajasthan, 2012, Quiver 3, 2014).

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the more unusual pieces of work is the only three-dimensional work that the artist ever realised, Continuum (1963/2005). The work allows the viewer to enter and enjoy an immersive experience.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The section called ‘Recent Developments’ explore Riley’s recent work using the disc has the primary form, the monumental wall painting Messengers has recently been installed at the National Gallery and here we have a small section of the same design and works from the Measure to Measure series.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating and entertaining exhibition provides a comprehensive study of one of Britain’s most original artists, Bridget Riley takes many of the ideas of perception and form and takes them to a different level. Many of her works are full of energy and action with a dynamic yet precise use of colour and form. Close inspection proves a challenge to the viewers who begins to question what they are actually seeing. This interaction is part of Riley’s mission to bring attention to the way that we percieve ourselves and the world around us.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Rare Bronze Age hoard at the Museum of London Docklands fron 3 April to 25 Oct 2020

Havering Hoard site discovery (c) Archaeological Solutions Ltd

The largest ever Bronze Age hoard to be discovered in London and the third largest of its kind in the UK, has been unearthed in Havering. This significant find will go on display for the first time in a major exhibition at the Museum of London Docklands in April 2020.

A total of 453 bronze objects dating between c.900 and c.800 BC have been uncovered during a planned archaeological investigation, with weapons and tools including axe heads, spearheads, fragments of swords, daggers and knives found alongside some other unusual objects, which are rarely found in the UK.

Havering Hoard (c) Museum of London

Because most of the weapons appear to be partially broken or damaged, the exhibition will offer some suggestions about why these objects ended up being carefully buried in groups close together.

Havering Hoard (c) Museum of London

Objects from the hoard will be presented to the public for the first time next year at the Museum of London Docklands. All the archaeological work was agreed with and closely monitored by Historic England, assisted by the Portable Antiquities Scheme, and further conservation and analysis of the artefacts is currently underway which will reveal more insights into this remarkable find.

Havering Hoard site discovery (c) Archaeological Solutions Ltd

Bronze Age finds of this type are very rare and discoveries like this develops the understanding of Bronze Age life. The exhibition is a unique opportunity for Londoners and visitors to find out more about their ancestors of the distant past.

Havering Hoard: A Bronze Age Mystery
Museum of London Docklands
Fri 3 Apr – Sun 25 Oct 2020
FREE

For more information, visit the Museum of London Dockland website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Nam June Paik at Tate Modern from 17 October 2019 to 9 February 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents a major exhibition of the work of Korean artist Nam June Paik, the artist is best known for his pioneering use of emerging technologies. The exhibition organised by Tate Modern and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is the most comprehensive survey of the artist’s work ever staged in the UK, bringing together over 200 works which covers the whole of the artist’s career.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Nam June Paik (1932-2006) was one of the first artists that foresaw the power of mass media and new technologies and began to experiment with using the electronic image through a number of innovative ways such as TV sets, live performances, global television broadcasts, single-channel videos, and video installations.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of the early installations in the exhibition is TV Garden 1974/2002, dozens of television sets appear from a garden of lush vegetation. Paik ‘s surreal arrangement contrasts the natural and the artificial world.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Nearby is TV Buddha 1974 in which a sculpture gazes through its own image through a closed circuit television and One Candle (Candle TV) 2004, both provide evidence of the way Paik brings together modern technology and ancient wisdom.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Paik had studied classical music in Tokyo and when he arrived in Europe in the 1950s, he was drawn to avant-garde composers like Stockhausen and Cage. He began to experiment in producing his own music and the Exposition of Music room in the exhibition features a number of his works.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the early 1960’s, Paik began to recognise how television was being used to manipulate its viewers, a television in the exhibition features President Nixon making a speech and Paik’s first robot work Robot K-456 1964 was a response to the fear that television was a danger to democracy. The artist began to experiment with electronic art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

As Paik’s career developed he began to collaborate with a number of artists, composers, designers and poets, the exhibition features his work with composer John Cage, choreographer Merce Cunningham and artist Joseph Beuys. Paik’s collaboration with cellist Charlotte Moorman developed into a number of performances incorporating Paik’s television sculptures which include TV Cello 1971 and TV Bra for Living Sculpture 1969.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Transmission room explores how Paik was one of the first artists who understood the potential of telecommunications to deliver art around the world in long distance live collaborations.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

His 1993 video wall entitled Internet Dreams refers to his prediction of a large global information network, Paik used the term ‘Electronic Superhighway’ in 1974.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The large installation One Candle (Candle Projection) 1989 brings the artist back to the ideas of Zen Buddhism and how evertthing is connected and changing.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition ends with the dazzling installation Sistine Chapel 1993, recreated for the first time since he was awarded the Golden Lion for the German pavilion at the Venice Biennale over 25 years ago.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating and playful exhibition offers the opportunity to discover the wonderful world of Nam June Paik. Although not widely known, his pioneering work into the arrival of the mass media and the digital revolution deserves greater recognition. Because of his background he made many connections between Eastern and Western cultures especially regarding the ways that things are interconnected. Paik recognised the potential and the dangers of the new types of media with his innovative and entertaining works.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Inspired by the east: how the Islamic world influenced western art at the British Museum from 10 October 2019 – 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The British Museum presents a new exhibition which explores how western artists have been inspired by the Islamic world. The exhibition entitled Inspired by the east: how the Islamic world influenced western art covers five centuries of artistic interaction and charts the long and complex cultural interactions between Europe and North America in the ‘west’, and North Africa and the Middle East in the ‘east’.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition centres on the tradition known as Orientalism, which developed in the ‘west and often offered a representation of the east that was considered ‘exotic’ and ‘mysterious’. Orientalism was at its peak during the 19th century when western artists and writers began visiting the Middle East and North Africa in greater numbers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition seeks to trace the origins of Orientalism back much further, to the 1500s. It also provides evidence that Orientalism was not just restricted to painting but influenced many types of visual and decorative arts such as ceramics, photography, glass, jewellery, manuscripts, clothing and contemporary art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A section of the exhibition explores how artists from the Islamic world were influenced by European artistic styles and technologies like photography to create work that was often supported by social elites in the region. Highlights of this section include works by Ottoman photographer Pascal Sébah, and a number of decorated portrait medals from the Middle East, heavily influenced by European styles.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Objects from the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia and key objects from the British Museum’s Islamic collection illustrate this story of cultural exchanges. Highlights include paintings by leading Orientalists including Eugène Delacroix, John Frederick Lewis and Frederick Arthur Bridgman with British artist Edmund Dulac’s original illustrations for a 1907 edition of the Arabian Nights, and ceramics by Théodore Deck, a leading French ceramicist in the late nineteenth century.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Orientalism is now often considered with some suspicion and often associated with a distorted view of Islamic culture. To recognise this, the exhibition concludes with four contemporary reactions to the imagery of Orientalism by Middle Eastern and North African female artists. These works including Lalla Essaydi’s Women of Morocco triptych and Inci Eviner’s 2009 video work Harem.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition illustrates that the cultural exchange between any societies is often fraught with misunderstandings and prejudices. This was certainly the case with Orientalism which developed against the backdrop of considerable distrust between the Christian and Islamic world. Even in the Middle Ages, the scientific advances, craftsmanship and high learning of the Islamic world were well known, however it was not till the 19th century that people visited the Middle East and North Africa in greater numbers. Some of the earliest visitors were writers and artists who often exaggerated the ‘exotic’ to sell their works and colonialists who sought to promote European culture over indigenous cultures. Against this background it is not surprising that Orientalism is a controversial term in the modern world.

After its run at the British Museum, the exhibition will open at the Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia from 20 June – 22 October 2020.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.

Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.

We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.

There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.

To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Gauguin Portraits at the National Gallery from 7 October 2019 to 26 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The National Gallery presents the first exhibition devoted to the portraits of Paul Gauguin (1848–1903), the exhibition entitled Gauguin Portraits explores how the French artist used the portrait to examine himself and many of his friends and sitters.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The landmark exhibition features over fifty works, including major loans from museums and private collections throughout the world and features a wide range of media including sculptures in ceramics and wood,  paintings and drawings. The exhibition covers the whole of Gauguin’s artistic career from his early years as an artist through to his final visit to the South Seas.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The first room of the exhibition is dedicated to self portraits and viewers can see the artist in a number of representations from the early Self Portrait, 1885 and Christ in the Garden of Olives, 1889 where Gauguin’s isolation and lack of success fed into a sense of persecution.  Gauguin was 35 when he committed to becoming a full time artist and the portraits provide evidence of the artist constantly reinventing himself.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Room 2 marks the period he artist spent in Brittany (1884–91) Gauguin turned his back on his life as a Paris stockbroker and become a leading figure of a new artists’ colony. The room also contains portraits of some of the friends and family including Madame Mette Gauguin in Evening Dress, 1884 and Interior with Aline, 1881.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Room 3 explores Gauguin’s relationship with Vincent van Gogh and Meijer de Haan, his famous working relationship with Van Gogh ended badly in 1888.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Room 4 covers Gauguin’s first Tahitian trip (1891-3) and illustrates some of the contradictions of the artist’s life. Although he wanted to escape from ‘civilisation’, he still looked for success in the art market. He was also disappointed to find that Tahitian women were encouraged to wear modest missionary dresses like Vahine no te vi ( Woman with a Mango) 1892.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Room 5 features work completed from his return to Paris and Brittany and his second stay in Tahiti (1893–5). His Self Portrait with Idol, 1893 illustrates how often his work at this time contains distinct Tahitian imagery.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Room 6 includes a selection of portraits in which Gauguin used symbolic objects, like still lifes to remember absent friends. Van Gogh is remembered by  Sunflowers with ‘Hope, 1901.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final room of the exhibition is devoted to Gauguin’s late portraits. They are often an indication that he had become disillusioned by his life in ‘ Paradise’ .  Local bishop, Père Paillard, is portrayed as a lecherous devil (Père Paillard, 1902,) and Barbarian Tales, 1902 sees East meeting West. His last self portrait, made shortly before the end of his life, aged 55 shows a man ravaged by illness and tormented by his lack of success.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition offers considerable insights into the life and times of Paul Gauguin the artist.  His artist career is full of contradictions, on the one hand he seeks commercial success and validation but on the other hand he wants to turn his back on ‘civilisation’ and settle in ‘paradise’.  Gauguin seemed to be an ‘outsider’ regardless of where he lived, the portraits in this exhibition seem to illustrate that he often enjoyed his status as a rebel whilst at the same time seeking reassurance from the art world.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here