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Visit the Royal Collection Online

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

In these trying times, it may not be possible to visit certain attractions and museums, but you can enjoy a virtual visit and get some background to understand more of the remarkable history of London and beyond.

The Royal Collection is one of the largest and most important art collections in the world, spread among some 15 royal residences and former residences across the UK. Virtual visitors can browse more than 250,000 works of art from the Royal Collection online, enjoy 360-degree tours of palaces and exhibitions, download fun family activities, watch behind-the scenes films and more on the Royal Collection Trust website.

Highlights below include a virtual tour of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, film footage giving a closer look than ever before at the tiny treasures of Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, and curators’ picks of the most extraordinary clocks in the Royal Collection – just in time for the clocks changing in the UK this weekend.

Virtual tours

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Buckingham Palace

Buckingham Palace is recognised around the world as the official London residence of Her Majesty The Queen. Developed in collaboration with Google Expeditions, this virtual tour gives users the chance to explore the Palace’s magnificent State Rooms in virtual reality or 360-degree format, and learn more from an expert curator about the treasures from the Royal Collection that furnish each room.

George IV: Art & Spectacle at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace
The most recent exhibition at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, George IV: Art & Spectacle explores the life and tastes of arguably the most magnificent of British monarchs. While the Gallery’s doors are temporarily closed, art-lovers can still experience George IV’s unrivalled collection of art through this virtual walkthrough.

Prince & Patron at the Summer Opening of Buckingham Palace
To mark the 70th birthday of His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, visitors to the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace in 2018 enjoyed a special display featuring a number of works of art personally selected by His Royal Highness. The exhibition can be enjoyed virtually on the Google Arts & Culture website.

Royal Collection behind-the-scenes films

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Condition checking Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House
Queen Mary’s Dolls’ House, a 1:12 scale miniature royal palace designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, has been on display at Windsor Castle for nearly a century. This film goes behind the scenes as curators and conservators carry out a condition check of its structure and contents. One room at a time, each of the Dolls’ House’s 1,000 miniature objects is carefully removed for condition assessment, light cleaning and photography.

Conservation of Queen Victoria’s Throne
Queen Victoria’s State Throne Chair was made for the young queen upon her accession in 1837. In this film curators and conservators explain the throne’s symbolic decorative scheme and demonstrate the techniques used to clean its delicate gold leaf surface. The throne still stands in the Throne Room at Buckingham Palace, alongside that of Her Majesty The Queen, and can be seen by the public during the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace each year.

Japanese Samurai Armour
This film takes a close look at a rare and splendid Japanese samurai armour, sent to James I by Shōgun Tokugawa Hidetada in 1614. Decorated with gold lacquer dragons and lined with silk, it was the first of many lavish diplomatic gifts exchanged between the British and Japanese royal and imperial families. The armour will take centre stage in Royal Collection Trust’s forthcoming exhibition Japan: Courts and Culture at The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, which will explore four centuries of diplomatic, artistic and cultural exchanges between Britain and Japan.

A Hidden Musical Surprise
As Royal Collection Trust conservators were restoring a 19th-century silver inkstand in the Royal Collection that had once belonged to Queen Mary, they discovered a tiny musical instrument hidden inside. In this short film, horological conservators restore the intricate miniature mechanism using miniscule tools, so that the inkstand’s enigmatic tune can be heard once again.

Digital catalogues

Queen Victoria’s Journals
The complete collection of Queen Victoria’s journals is available to the public for free in the UK. The 43,000 pages of journal entries give readers a unique insight into Victoria’s own thoughts about her remarkable life and reign – from her first diary entry at the age of 13 to her initial impressions upon meeting ‘beautiful’ Prince Albert three years later; her pride on her coronation day and her last entry just ten days before her death in 1901 aged 81.

Prince Albert: His Life and Legacy
As Consort of Queen Victoria, Prince Albert’s roles in national life included unofficial Private Secretary, a mentor to some of the greatest national projects of his day, and collector and patron of the arts. This website makes available some 23,500 items from the Royal Collection, Royal Archives and Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851, shedding new light on Albert’s profound influence on Victorian society.

Georgian Papers Programme
History enthusiasts can explore more than 100,000 documents in the Royal Archives and Royal Library relating to the Georgian period, and can even get involved in this ongoing digitisation project by helping to transcribe handwritten official and personal papers relating to George III, George IV, William IV and more.

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

Up close with paintings in the Royal Collection

Lady at the Virginal with a Gentleman, ‘The Music Lesson’, by Johannes Vermeer
One of just 34 surviving paintings by Vermeer, ‘The Music Lesson’ is enormously popular with visitors to the Summer Opening of the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace each year. In this Google Arts & Culture story, users can explore the painting in minute detail and discover more from expert curators about Vermeer’s remarkable techniques, which have earned him the title ‘Master of Light’.

Massacre of the Innocents, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder
Usually on display in the State Apartments at Windsor Castle, Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s masterpiece brings together multiple narrative scenes to form one larger composition. This Google Arts & Culture story examines each episode one by one and details the changes made to the painting throughout its history to cover up the more disturbing elements of the story.

Activities for children

Royal Collection Trust / (c) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020.

A variety of learning resources for children at nursery, primary and secondary level are freely available on the Royal Collection Trust website, helping parents and teachers to bring the curriculum to life.

Interactive Activities
In an interactive game, Bring on the Battle, children can learn about the siege tactics used to defend Windsor Castle from enemies in medieval times. They’ll also discover what it takes to become a knight and the best way to build and fortify a castle. History pupils can test their knowledge of Henry VIII by playing King of the Castle, revealing how heavy the King’s jousting armour was, and even the unusual things he ate for dinner.

Worksheets
A selection of downloadable worksheets can be printed at home, giving children the opportunity to get creative. Inspired by some of the beautiful objects in the Royal Collection, children can design their own Coat of Arms and paint their own portrait miniatures.

Leonardo da Vinci Schools Resource pack
An extensive resource pack was produced as part of Royal Collection Trust’s nationwide touring exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: A Life in Drawing in 2019. Developed in consultation with teachers, it contains activities, videos and worksheets that use Leonardo’s drawings as an entry point into a range of subjects, including Maths and Science. Each resource is helpfully matched to Key Stages at both primary and secondary level in the national curriculum for England, Wales and Scotland.

Downloadable publications

Maria Merian’s Butterflies
One of the most extraordinary female artists of her age, Maria Sibylla Merian was an intrepid German artist and scientist who brought the wonders of South America to Europe in the early 18th century. This charming free book brings together 200 of Merian’s dazzling illustrations of the natural world, produced during her travels through Suriname in South America in 1699.

High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson
The absurdities of fashion, the perils of love, political machinations and royal intrigue were the daily subject-matter of Thomas Rowlandson, one of the wittiest and most popular caricaturists of Georgian Britain. This free title, featuring almost 100 of Rowlandson’s finest comic works in the Royal Collection, offers a new perspective on an era best known through the novels of Jane Austen.

Curator’s Choice collections

Keeping Time: Clocks in the Royal Collection
The Royal Collection includes hundreds of historical clocks and watches that have been collected by monarchs through the centuries, many of which are among the finest ever made. From musical and organ clocks to complex astronomical clocks, this online collection brings together some of the most extraordinary timepieces in the Royal Collection.

Women Photographers in the Royal Collection
This online collection explores the historical and contemporary importance of women to the creation, study and dissemination of photographs. Users can browse highlights of the Royal Collection’s significant body of work by pioneering women photographers, including works by Frances Sally Day, Julia Margaret Cameron, Alice Hughes, Dorothy Wilding and Annie Leibovitz.

For more information, visit the Royal Collection website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

A Short Guide to Horse Guards Parade

For many visitors to London, Horse Guards Parade is often seen as a short cut from Whitehall to Buckingham Palace. However, the large parade ground has a long and interesting history and is still used for large scale ceremonies like Trooping the Colour, Beating Retreat and the smaller scale but regular Changing The Queen’s Life Guard.

Horse Guards Parade was formerly the site of the Palace of Whitehall’s tiltyard, where tournaments that included jousting were held in the time of Henry VIII. It was also used in the annual celebrations of the birthday of Queen Elizabeth I. It has often been the main parade ground in London and has been used for a variety of reviews, parades and other ceremonies since the 17th century.

Sitting in the heart of the British Government it is surrounded by important buildings which have been used and are still used by the government and military purposes. Horse Guards Parade was once the Headquarters of the British Army, The Duke of Wellington was based here in the 19th century. The Parade ground is flanked by Admiralty House, the Treasury building (now used by the Cabinet Office) and the rear of 10 Downing Street. Despite its historical importance, in the late 20th century, the parade was used as a car park for senior civil servants.

Horse Guards Parade is the location of a number of military monuments and statues these include the Guards Memorial, the Royal Naval Division War Memorial, Equestrian statues of Field Marshals Roberts and Wolseley. To the south are the statues of Field Marshal Kitchener and of Admiral of the Fleet Mountbatten.

There is a Turkish cannon made in 1524 “by Murad son of Abdullah, chief gunner” which was captured in Egypt in 1801, The Cádiz Memorial, a French mortar mounted on a brass monster commemorates the lifting of the siege of Cádiz in Spain in 1812.

An oddity is the black background to the number 2 of the double sided clock which overlooks the Parade Ground and the front entrance, it is popularly thought to commemorate the time the last absolute monarch of England, Charles I, was beheaded at the Banqueting House opposite. One of the more bizarre uses of Horse Guards Parade was as the location of the beach volleyball at the 2012 London Summer Olympics.

Not as well known as Changing the Guard at Buckingham Palace, Changing The Queen’s Life Guard has smaller crowds and no railings which allows spectators to get very close to the action.

‘The Queen’s Life Guard’, mounted on horses are a familiar sight as they ride to Change the Guard on Horse Guards Parade. The Queen’s Life Guard is normally provided by men of the Household Cavalry Mounted Regiment which consists of a Squadron of The Life Guards, who wear red tunics and white plumed helmets, and a Squadron of The Blues and Royals with blue tunics and red plumed helmets.

The Life Guards have stood guard at Horse Guards, since the Restoration of King Charles II in 1660. The New Guard leaves Hyde Park Barracks at 10:28 weekdays and 9:28 on Sundays to ride to Horse Guards Parade via Hyde Park Corner, Constitution Hill and The Mall on their way to the guard change ceremony. Changing the Life Guard takes place daily at 11:00 weekdays and 10:00 on Sundays. The ceremony lasts about half an hour and is full of pageantry and colour.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review – Titian: Love Desire Death at the National Gallery from 16 March to 14 June 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Titian’s epic series of large-scale mythological paintings, known as the poesie, are brought together in its entirety for the first time since the late 16th century at the National Gallery. The series was painted between about 1551 and 1562 and are considered some of the most original visual interpretations of Classical myth for their rich, expressive and colourful rendition.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

From the original cycle of six paintings, the exhibition reunites Danaë (1551–3, The Wellington Collection, Apsley House); Venus and Adonis (1554, Prado, Madrid); Diana and Actaeon (1556–9) and Diana and Callisto (1556–9), jointly owned by the National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland; and the recently conserved Rape of Europa (1562) from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Following its landmark decision to lend works on a temporary basis for the first time in its 119-year history, the Wallace Collection has loaned its painting from the cycle, Perseus and Andromeda, (1554–6), to the exhibition in Trafalgar Square.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The National Gallery’s Death of Actaeon (1559–75), originally conceived as part of the series, but only executed much later and never delivered, is also displayed.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

All the paintings illustrate Titian’s remarkable talent to create a narrative in which mythological scenes contain a whole range of very human emotions like love, desire, guilt, surprise, shame, desperation, anguish, and terror. The paintings depict stories primarily drawn from the Roman poet Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Because Titian considered the paintings similar to poetry, he called them his ‘poesie’. The series was commissioned by Philip II of Spain and consolidated Titian’s reputation as one of the most famous painters of his period.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Titian’s six poesie for Philip II of Spain have had an incredible history, two remained in Madrid, Spain: Danaë and Venus and Adonis. Danaë remained longer, but was taken by Joseph Bonaparte in 1813 and seized by Wellington in the Battle of Vitoria, after which it came to England. Venus and Adonis was also in England, as Titian sent it to Philip when he was in London, having just married Mary Tudor (1516–58). The other four, Perseus and Andromeda, Rape of Europa, Diana and Callisto, and Diana and Actaeon, plus the unfinished The Death of Actaeon, passed by different routes into the collection of Philippe II, Duc d’Orléans (1674–1723). When this collection was auctioned in London in 1798, the five poesie were divided but remained in British collections throughout the 19th century. Perseus and Andromeda was unsold at the first sale, and then changed hands before being sold at the second Duc d’Orléans sale in 1805.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In 1896 Rape of Europa was sold to Isabella Stewart Gardner for her collection in Boston, USA. Perseus and Andromeda was secured for Britain the following year as part of the Wallace Collection bequest. In 1972, when The Death of Actaeon was offered for sale, the National Gallery successfully purchased the painting with the help of government funds and following a nationwide public appeal. In 2009, the National Gallery and the National Galleries of Scotland jointly acquired Diana and Actaeon; and in 2012, Diana and Callisto, securing the last two of these masterpieces for the public.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This remarkable exhibition is a once in a lifetime opportunity to view in one room, Titian’s six poesie for Philip II of Spain painted in the mid 16th century. That all six paintings have survived the vagaries of war, destruction and political turmoil over four centuries is a miracle in itself and the small intimate exhibition provides a wonderful opportunity to study the paintings in some detail. Titian is one of those rare artists who was not only famous in his own time but has retained his reputation over the centuries, this exhibition illustrates why he is considered one of the most important artists in the history of European painting.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Andy Warhol at Tate Modern from 12 March to 6 September 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents an exhibition which features the work of Andy Warhol (1928–87), the exhibition is the first at the gallery for almost 20 years and explores the man behind the image.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features over 100 works from across his career and provides some insights into how Warhol’s personal experiences led to his unique take on American 20th century culture.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Born Andrew Warhola, he grew up in Pittsburgh to parents who emigrated from a small village in the north-east of the former Czechoslovak Republic. The Warhola family were devout followers of the Byzantine Ruthenian Catholic Church, and the impact of the strong religious conviction of his mother Julia Warhola especially on the artist is considered an important influence in his life. The exhibition also examines how Warhol’s sexuality influenced his work starting with a selection of his evocative early line drawings of male portraits and nudes from the 1950s.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Both in personality and sexuality, Warhol considered himself an outsider and was attracted to those on the margins of American society.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

One of his early works is the film Sleep 1963 which documents Warhol’s lover at the time.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Warhol is best known for his iconic paintings of Campbell Soup cans, Coca-Cola bottles and Marilyn Monroe prints which provided an unique take on American consumerism and culture. Key works from the pop period are included the exhibition, such as Marilyn Diptych 1962, Elvis I and II 1963/1964 and Race Riot 1964.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is also a recreation of the psychedelic multimedia environment of Exploding Plastic Inevitable 1966, originally produced for the Velvet Underground rock shows.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors will also be able to experience Warhol’s floating Silver Clouds 1966 installation, initially meant to signal his ‘retirement’ from painting in favour of moviemaking.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It was around this time that Warhol set up the Factory and became interested in underground filmmaking, between 1963 to 1967, Warhol and his collaborators made around 500 films that generally featured the various personalities that spent their time in the Factory.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Following his shooting by Valerie Solanas in 1968, Warhol returned to large-scale painting projects and the exhibition includes the largest grouping of his 1975 Ladies and Gentlemen series ever shown in the UK. These striking portraits depict figures from New York’s transgender community.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition ends with one of Warhol’s final works from the 80s,the poignant Sixty Last Suppers 1986 on view at Tate Modern for the first time in this country which is said to reflect how the HIV/AIDS epidemic impacted on the lives of many in his close circle.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Perhaps one of the more bizarre exhibits is three of Warhol’s wigs on loan from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition explores the multilayered world of Andy Warhol who charted the immense social, political and technological change of America by creating works of art that mirrored some of the methods of American consumerism. However, the exhibition does illustrate that Warhol had a particular affection for those ‘outsiders’ who were finding their own desires, identity and belief. Warhol was not only recording his own period, he was providing a glimpse of the future where art becomes part of the mainstream consumer society and many people would seek to have their ’15 minutes of fame.’

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A special treat for Mother’s Day Weekend at Severndroog Castle

Severndroog Castle is hosting a unique afternoon tea experience on Mother’s Day weekend. Not only will attendees be delighted by culinary goodies, but they’ll also be able to enjoy a trip to the viewing platform at the top of the Castle, which boasts some of the most spectacular panoramic viewsover London and the surrounding counties.

A special 30-minute guided group tour of the two main rooms of the Castle will start at 13:30, where visitors will learn about Sir William and Lady James, the building’s uses over the years and the campaign to save the Castle.

Afternoon Tea will then be served in the historic Lady James Room, with views of the surrounding ancient woodland through the gothic windows. Food will be provided by onsite Terrace Catering under the direction of head chef, Christopher Hackett, who shares a passion for creating memorable dining experiences at Severndroog. He was ‘Young Chef of the Year’ in 2008 and runner up for the BBC2 show ‘The Restaurant’, working alongside Raymond Blanc, and has worked in some of the finest restaurants in London, including Fat Duck, Bluebird and The Savoy.

A set menu afternoon tea will be served at 14:15 to include a selection of sandwiches, scones with preserve and clotted cream, a selection of homemade cakes, a pot of tea, plus a glass of bubbly!

Details:
Saturday 21st March 2020 at 13:30 – 16:30 GMT
At Severndroog Castle. Castlewood, Shooters Hill, London SE18 3RT
Ticket Prices: Tickets are £25 per person + booking fee; each ticket includes a guided tour, access to the viewing
platform and an afternoon tea. Pre-booking required. Limited availability.

Book tickets on Eventbrite: Here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Golden ‘bulla’ dazzles the British Museum

Photograph © British Museum

It has been called ‘one of the most significant discoveries from this period, the Bronze age or first age of metal, to be made in Britain for more than a century. The remakable brilliantly decorated sun pendant illustrates the importance of sun worship, 3,000 years years ago.

Photograph © British Museum

The sun pendant, 3.6cm high and 4.7cm wide, dating from is only the second ever found in Britain. The other was lost in the 19th century, although six similar but not identical gold pendants have been found in Ireland.

Photograph © British Museum

This type of pendant is known as a ‘bulla’, after the Latin word for bubble. A bulla is a large hollow pendant made of sheet gold which would have been suspended and probably worn as adornment. The contents of the hollow pendant from Shropshire remain a mystery and are the subject of on-going analysis by scientists at the British Museum.

Photograph © British Museum

The pendant is one of a small number of contemporary, precious objects made to celebrate the religious and sacred aspect of the sun during the Bronze Age. They have been found across Europe, including the famous Trundholm Sun Chariot from Denmark and the ‘sun discs’ of North-West Europe.

Photograph © British Museum

A metal detectorist in Shropshire in 2018, found the astonishingly well-preserved gold pendant decorated on all its shimmering surfaces with semi-circles and geometric motifs. One side shows a stylized sun, solar symbolism is a key element of Bronze Age cosmology and mythology across Europe, but before the discovery of this pendant was very rarely seen on objects found in Britain. The pendant was reported to the local Finds Liaison Officer for Shropshire & Herefordshire, who notified the Coroner and brought it to the British Museum under the Treasure process. The Coroner found the bulla to be ‘Treasure and the independent Treasure Valuation Committee recommended a value of a quarter of a million pounds to the Secretary of State. In light of the significance of the object, the British Museum was keen to acquire it and with support from Art Fund and the American Friends of the British Museum the pendant has now entered the collection.

Photograph © British Museum

When it is shown at the British Museum the pendant will be displayed near to other famous Bronze Age objects such as the Mold Gold Cape, which was found relatively close to where the pendant was discovered. Both are witness to the artistic skill and ingenuity of the period, challenging preconceptions that deep history was an ‘uncivilised’ or ‘unskilled’ time.

Before it is displayed at the British Museum, the Shropshire Marches Bulla will go to the Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery for its’ first public display later this year.

For more information, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review: Among the Trees at the Hayward Gallery from 4 March to 17 May 2020

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Hayward Gallery presents Among the Trees that celebrates works of art that are inspired by trees and forests. The exhibition spans the past 50 years and brings together works by 38 leading international artists from five different continents. Timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, the exhibition explores how trees have shaped human civilisation and how they play an indispensable role in our lives and imaginations.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition includes a wide variety of media from immersive video installations, life-sized sculptures, large-scale paintings, drawings and black-and-white photographs. Participating artists are: Robert Adams, Eija-Liisa Ahtila, Yto Barrada, Johanna Calle, Gillian Carnegie, Tacita Dean, Peter Doig, Jimmie Durham, Kirsten Everberg, Anya Gallaccio, Simryn Gill, Rodney Graham, Shi Guowei, Hugh Hayden, Eva Jospin, Kazuo Kadonaga, William Kentridge, Toba Khedoori, Luisa Lambri, Myoung Ho Lee, Zoe Leonard, Robert Longo, Sally Mann, Steve McQueen, Jean-Luc Mylayne, Mariele Neudecker, Virginia Overton, Roxy Paine, Giuseppe Penone, Abel Rodríguez, Ugo Rondinone, George Shaw, Robert Smithson, Jennifer Steinkamp, Thomas Struth, Rachel Sussman, Pascale Marthine Tayou and Jeff Wall.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition takes place in five galleries, each one having a variety of works. Gallery 1 features a series of photographs by Robert Adams which examines the impact of present-day human activity on nature. A tree sculpture by Anya Gallacio draws the attention as does a six-metre-high wooden sculpture by Giuseppe Penone.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Crowhurst II by Tacita Dean evokes a mysterious old tree.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 2 is dominated by Eva Jospin’s Foret Palatine and the ghostly drawings of Toba Khedoori.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 3 features a 16-metre-long video portrait of a Finnish spruce by Eija-Liisa Ahtila.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 4 introduces us to the wood itself with works by Giuseppe Penone and Ugo Rondinone’s sculpture of an ancient olive tree.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Gallery 5 has Jennifer Steinkamp’s 15-metre-long animated video projection which places us in the midst of a birch forest as it cycles through the four seasons.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This unusual exhibition provides viewers with a unique chance to go for a walk in the woods and forests of contemporary art, the enormous diversity of nature has long been a subject for artists and many of the works reflect the beauty and the complexity of the natural world around us. Some artists bring attention to the effects that human activity are having on nature and the importance of maintaining the delicate balance of the natural world.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and book tickets , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here