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IAAPA Expo Europe at London’s ExCeL Exhibition Centre from September 12th -15th 2022

IAAPA Expo Europe returns to London for the first time in over ten years, the Expo is a one-stop shop for the latest tech, innovation and trends driving the leisure industry.

As UK tourism and attractions ride the wave of recovery after the challenges of the pandemic. IAAPA Expo Europe explores some of the themes like innovation, technology, and sustainability across the recovering ‘experience’ market, attracting industry leaders from the biggest theme parks to hotels, local attractions, and zoos.

Over 500 exhibitors take over the enormous trade show floor, the event includes not only the trade show, but also a four-day education conference with leading industry professionals giving unique insights into the industry.

The exhibitors showcasing their latest products and services, including state-of-the-art rides, virtual reality, motion simulators, design and theming,

food and beverage, health and safety, point of sale, playground equipment, arcades and coin machines, pools, water equipment and much more.

Whilst the Expo is for trade only, the rides and products will be enjoyed by people in amusement and theme parks, zoos and aquariums,

family entertainment centres, historic and cultural tourist attractions, museums and science centres to shopping malls, hotels, and retailers all around the world.

For more information, visit the IAAPA Expo Europe website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature at the National Gallery from 10 September 2022 to 8 January 2023

The National Gallery presents the first in-depth exhibition in the UK of the art of Winslow Homer (1836–1910), one of the most celebrated and admired American painters of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The exhibition, which will display around 50 paintings and watercolours from public and private collections, spanning over 40 years of the artist’s career, and presents an opportunity for visitors this side of the Atlantic to discover an artist who, although a household name in America. Homer is not well known in Europe. There is no painting by Homer in a UK public collection.

The exhibition will be both chronological and thematic and focus on powerful imagery of conflict and its resolution. It will explore the complex social and geopolitical issues of his era as well as broader concerns with the fragility of human life and dominance of nature.

Winslow Homer: Force of Nature explores show how the artist’s ability to distil complex situations to the most powerful, yet simple, compositions led to many of his paintings and dazzling watercolours becoming emblematic of post-Civil War American life.

Largely self-taught, having begun his career as a commercial illustrator for US publications such as Harper’s Weekly, Homer was adept at graphic art and visitors will see how he skilfully captured moments of historical significance without creating overtly political statements.

Highlights of the exhibition include his paintings from the front lines of the American Civil War (1861–1865), where he sketched battle scenes and camp life. The Civil War is the subject of one of his most famous paintings from this period, Prisoners from the Front (1866), shown at the beginning of the exhibition. Prisoners will be displayed with other Civil War-era pictures such as Defiance, Inviting a Shot before Petersburg (1864).

A section of the exhibition will be devoted to Homer’s return to the United States when he continued to be interested in the lives of African Americans after the end of slavery in a period known as Reconstruction (1865–1877). Homer’s A Visit from the Old Mistress (1876), depicting an encounter between a group of newly emancipated women and their former mistress. The Cotton Pickers (1876), features two Black women silhouetted against troubled skies while working in the cotton fields. This ambitious painting was acquired in New York in 1877 by a British cotton merchant who exhibited the painting at the Summer Exhibition of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, in 1878.

The exhibition will also focus on Homer’s time in England. In 1881, he docked at Liverpool before heading to London where he visited the museums, studying ancient Greek and Roman antiquities at the British Museum and British painting at the National Gallery, including Constable’s landscapes and Turner’s oils and watercolours of peaceful seascapes and tumultuous scenes of storms and shipwrecks alike. From London, Homer headed to Cullercoats, a small fishing community on the North Sea near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, which provided him with poignant and inspirational motifs of the dangers and hardships of maritime life and of the power of the ocean. The exhibition includes paintings from this period such as Inside the Bar (1883) and The Gale (1883-1893).

Between 1884 and 1909, Homer travelled to the Bahamas, Cuba, Florida, and Bermuda where he created many watercolours which suited the subjects of warm clear waters, lush vegetation, humid climate and dazzling light. Homer considered these works as integral and important parts of his art and legacy.

His fascination with the Caribbean increased alongside his life-long engagement with the charged subjects of racial prejudice, geopolitics and ecology. This culminated with his landmark tropical painting: The Gulf Stream (1899, reworked by 1906).

The exhibition will chart the final years of Homer’s life when he increasingly retreated from large urban centres, living in nature on the rugged coast in Maine, where he painted scenes of symbolic reflections on mortality. Paintings such as Driftwood (1909) and Right and Left (1909) will be on show.

Homer, Force of Nature is part of the National Gallery’s strategy over the last 10 years of introducing British audiences to American art.

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – Carolee Schneemann: Body Politics at the Barbican Art Gallery from 8 September 2022 – 8 January 2023

Carolee Schneemann: Body Politics is the first survey in the UK of the work of American artist Carolee Schneemann (1939-2019) and the first major exhibition since her death in 2019. The exhibition explores Schneemann’s diverse and interdisciplinary work over six decades.

The exhibition features over 300 objects, from the Carolee Schneemann Foundation, as well as numerous private and public collections. Carolee Schneemann: Body Politics brings together paintings, sculptural assemblages, performance photographs, films and large-scale multimedia installations, as well as rarely seen archival material including scores, sketches, scrapbooks, programmes and costumes.

Although today, the personal and political are often enmeshed by many artists, Schneemann using this approach in the 1960s and 70s was considered radical. Schneemann often took her own body as a model and starting point to recognise and challenge how history had defined the lives and bodies of women.

Although predominantly known as a performance artist, she considered herself foremost a painter. Opening the exhibition are the artist’s rarely seen early gestural paintings, including Aria Duetto (Cantata No.78): Yellow Ladies (1957) and Pin Wheel (1957), a kinetic painting activated by the potter’s wheel on which it is mounted.

In her early works on canvas, Schneemann was influenced by American Abstract Expressionism and Paul Cézanne, but was desperate to find her own style.

From the early 1960s, she experimented with ‘painting-constructions’ and ‘box-constructions’. For the assemblage Colorado House (1962), she slashed, ripped and reconfigured what she considered to be failed paintings, while for the diorama-like Pharaoh’s Daughter (1966), she filled a wooden box with glowing lights, slides of biblical scenes and mirrors.

The exhibition charts Schneemann’s radical work using her own body as a medium, key works from this period include a series of photographs from Schneemann’s first solo performance Eye Body: 36 Transformative Actions for Camera (1963), in which she staged a series of gestures amid a sprawling environment of materials.

For Up to and Including Her Limits (1976), she hung naked from a harness suspended in the corner of a paper-lined stage set, creating gestural abstract marks with crayons as she swung back and forth in a trance-like state.

In the early 1960s Schneemann was living in New York City and was part of the downtown scene. She became a founding member of the Judson Dance Theater, a group of avant-garde interdisciplinary artists including Yvonne Rainer, Lucinda Childs, Trisha Brown, David Gordon and Steve Paxton, who took everyday gestures and materials as their medium.

Schneemann described her group performances as ‘kinetic theatre’, incorporating complex movement scores, sets, lighting, sound and technical innovations. Numerous performances are represented through photographs, films, scores, sketches, notes and costumes, including one of Schneemann’s most iconic performances Meat Joy (1964).

A focused section of the show shines a spotlight on Schneemann’s time spent in London. The city provided the context for several of her experimental performances, including Round House (staged at the Roundhouse in 1967, as part of a line-up that included poet Allen Ginsburg, anti-psychiatrist R.D. Laing and Black Power activist Stokely Carmichael, among others), Naked Action Lecture (performed at the ICA in 1968), and ICES STRIP/ISIS TRIP (performed on roller skates on a train travelling from London to Edinburgh in 1972).

The final section of the exhibition includes a series of works that address the precarious nature of life and the politics of human suffering in the context of the Vietnam War, the Civil War in Lebanon, the terrorist attacks of 9/11 and the artist’s own fight with cancer.

This fascinating exhibition illustrates that Schneemann was a radical pioneer who often often had to deal with considerable hostility to her work. Using deeply personal experiences in art can lead accusations of being narcissistic and a number of feminists raised this criticism of Schneemann’s work. Her later work concentrated on local and global politics especially related to how images from the media are diluted to obscure the suffering of war victims. Schneemann may not be widely known outside of the art world, but this exhibition is an opportunity to access her legacy in feminist art history.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

William Kentridge at the Royal Academy from 24 September to 11 December 2022

In September 2022, the Royal Academy of Arts will host a major exhibition of the work of the internationally celebrated South African artist, William Kentridge. Working closely with the artist and his studio, this ambitious and immersive exhibition has been specifically curated for the Royal Academy and will encompass the broad repertoire of Kentridge’s forty-year career. It will bring together important works spanning from the 1980s through to the present day, including charcoal drawings, animated films, a mechanical theatre, sculptures, tapestries and performance pieces.

William Kentridge, Drawing for The Head & The Load (The trumpets we used to blow), 2018.

William Kentridge is known for his distinctive drawings, animated films, performances, and largescale productions. While at times his work is semi-autobiographical, he also uses history to highlight the inequities, barbarity, and absurdities of the modern world. A particular area of focus is the European colonisation of and the ongoing post-colonial legacy across the African continent. The issues of racial inequality combined with social, political, and economic injustices are a critical component of Kentridge’s work. For many years Kentridge has also worked closely with a group of creative collaborators including composers, dancers, stage designers, puppeteers, weavers, printmakers, and metalsmiths.

William Kentridge,The Conservationists’ Ball, 1985.

A selection of Kentridge’s early, rarely-seen drawings from the 1980s and 1990s will be presented, including three triptychs displayed together for the first time and the most significant work from the period, The Conservationist’s Ball, 1985. Around 25 large charcoal drawings, made for the creative process of the eleven animated Drawings for Projection, will also be shown. An extensive selection of drawings from the entire series will be displayed together with five of the eleven animated charcoal-drawing films made between 1989 – 2020.

Several further important films, performances and installations will feature in the exhibition. A key installation will be Black Box / Chambre Noire, 2005, a mechanical theatre piece including puppets and projections, which interrogates the harrowing story of the massacre of the Herero people in Namibia, now considered the first genocide of the twentieth century.

Ubu Tells the Truth, 1997, is a sharply critical animated film referencing the play Ubu Roi (1986) by French symbolist writer Alfred Jarry, which reveals the brutality of the apartheid system in South Africa. Alongside the film, Kentridge will create a large site-specific wall drawing to complement the film. Notes Towards a Model Opera, 2015, is a three-screen projection which reflects on modern Chinese history and Chairman Mao’s Cultural Revolution. Two of Kentridge’s films will have their first UK presentations in the exhibition; the short, animated film, De como não fui ministro d’estado, 2012 and Sibyl, 2019.

Willliam Kentridge, Comrade Tree, I Report to You, 2020.

Amongst the most recent works, made in 2021 – 2022, will be a sequence of large-scale tapestries, created especially for the Royal Academy galleries and made in the Stephens Tapestry Studio in Diepsloot, Johannesburg. There will also be a group of large flower drawings, as well as a selection of Kentridge’s distinctive tree drawings. Many of these include rubrics, recalling a tradition that dates back to medieval manuscripts to emphasise certain words within a text. Conjunctions of words are gathered by Kentridge and used in his drawings in an apparently random manner.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Maria Bartuszová at the Tate Modern from 20 September 2022 to 16 April 2023

Tate Modern will present the UK’s first major exhibition of the work of Maria Bartuszová (1936-1996), an artist who created a world of sculpture on her own terms using innovative methods in plaster casting. From raindrops and eggs to the human body, Bartuszová took inspiration from organic forms and cycles in the natural world. Spanning the breadth of her remarkable 30-year career, this show will reveal a prolific body of tactile, sensual, and evocative sculptures, shaped by the artist’s personal experiences and deep love of nature.

Bringing together over 50 of Bartuszová’s delicate plaster works alongside bronze casts and aluminium reliefs, many of which have never been shown in this country before it will offer a rare chance to discover how this little-known artist created her own world of abstract sculpture.

Although born in Prague, Bartuszová spent the majority of her career in Košice, the second largest city in what was then Czechoslovakia, near the border with Hungary and Ukraine. Closed off from direct contact with European and global events during the Cold War, she worked in relative seclusion, with few opportunities to exhibit during her lifetime. Despite this, Bartuszová built an outstanding legacy of around 500 sculptures which remain a testament to her unique vision and persistent experimentation.

The exhibition will explore how Bartuszová worked inventively and quickly, using the fleeting and liquid process of casting to create simultaneously solid and delicate artworks. In the early 1960s, she created abstract shapes by pouring plaster into rubber balloons and moulding it using pressure and tension, a method she coined ‘gravistimulation’.

Maria Batuszová in her studio in Košice, Slovakia, with her sculptures c.1987 – photo: Gabriel Kladek

Experimenting further in the 1980s, Bartuszová developed a new practice of plaster shaping she termed ‘pneumatic casting’, in which she blew air into balloons and poured plaster over their surface. This created empty, negative volumes and ever more fragile, hollow shapes resembling shells and eggs – described by the artist as “a tiny void full of a tiny infinite universe”. Works from Bartuszová’s Endless Egg series will be displayed alongside elaborate eggshell clusters such as Untitled (1984), expressing feelings of personal crisis in their fragility and destruction.

Bartuszová continually explored ways in which sculpture could engage the imagination and activate the senses. In the mid-1960s she began creating plaster sculptures composed of interlocking shapes, such as Folded Figure (1965), and later bronze and aluminium puzzle-like sculptures such as Folded Figure, Horizontal, Haptic, (1974 cast 1975) which could be taken apart and reassembled to spark creative thinking. A range of rarely seen archive photographs by art historian and photographer Gabriel Kladek document how her sculptures were innovatively used in expressive workshops for blind and partially sighted children.

The exhibition will also highlight how forms and themes that the artist developed in her studio were brought into public spaces through her state-funded commissions for buildings, monuments, playgrounds and fountains. The elongated droplets of Rain (1963) are echoed in the bronze fountain she created for the Institute for Physically Disabled Children in Košice (1967–71), while her geometric wall-based works inspired her monumental reliefs for the Southern Slovak Paper Mill (1973–5) and Eastern Slovak Steelworks (1974). Visitors will also discover the futuristic models Bartuszová designed for playground climbing frames and slides and explore the making process behind her monumental public sculpture Metamorphosis, Two-Part Sculpture (1982) at the entrance to the Košice crematorium.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Lucian Freud: New Perspectives at the National Gallery from 1 October 2022 – 22 January 2023

The National Gallery stages a landmark exhibition to mark the centenary of the birth of the great 20th-century artist Lucian Freud (1922-2011.)

This first major survey of his paintings for 10 years will bring together a large selection of his most important works from across seven decades – spanning early works such as Girl with Roses from the 1940s; to Reflection with Two Children (Self-Portrait) in the 1960s and right through to his famous late works.

This exhibition seeks to present new perspectives on Freud’s art, focusing on his tireless and ever-searching commitment to the medium of painting.

From his most intimate pictures to his celebrated large-scale canvases, Lucian Freud: New Perspectives will give visitors the opportunity to see the wide range of work and the artistic development of one of Britain’s finest figurative painters.

Lucian Freud: New Perspectives will include more than 60 loans from museums and major private collections around the world including The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Tate; the British Council Collection; London and the Arts Council Collection, London.

A connoisseur of European painting and regular visitor since his earliest days in London, Lucian Freud had a close association with the National Gallery. ‘I use the gallery as if it were a doctor,’ Freud told the journalist Michael Kimmelman. ‘I come for ideas and help – to look at situations within paintings, rather than whole paintings. ‘

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts and the Supernatural at the Charles Dickens Museum from 5 October 2022 to 19 February 2023

A new exhibition at the Charles Dickens Museum entitled To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts & the Supernatural celebrates Dickens’s interest in the paranormal. Opening in time for Halloween, the exhibition runs from 5 October 2022 – 19 February 2023 at 48 Doughty Street, Holborn, the home of Dickens and his family in the late 1830s.

Charles Dickens wrote twenty ghost stories throughout his life, published from 1836 onwards. From A Christmas Carol to The Signal Man, to elements of Bleak House and Nicholas Nickleby, as well as The Chimes and The Trial for Murder.

The exhibition brings together a collection of objects, posters, letters and books to reveal just how much Dickens enjoyed creating eerie scenes, disturbing characters and building tension to toy with the emotions of his audiences. It will be accompanied by a new programme of events, including after-hours house tours, as well as haunting soundscapes in Dickens’s home.

Among the highlights of the exhibition:

The first public display of a letter from Dickens to his spiritually-minded acquaintance, William Howitt, in which Dickens asks whether Howitt can suggest a haunted house that his friend might visit. On 31 October 1859, Dickens writes to Howitt about ghosts and asks whether he knows of “any haunted house whatsoever within the limits of the United Kingdom where nobody can live, eat, drink, sit, stand, lie or sleep without sleep-molestation” as he has a friend ready to pit himself against it.

Charles Dickens’s own copy of The Haunted Man, his 1848 ghost story. Dickens physically altered copies of his books for his public readings, adding stage directions and, in this edition, uses different coloured inks to indicate deletions, express emotions and emphasise emotive words.

The first depiction of the four ghosts from A Christmas Carol. Pencil sketches by Dickens’s illustrator, John Leech, which were used in preparation of the full colour illustrations that featured in the first edition of the book in December 1843. While Dickens was undeniably fascinated by the notion of ghosts and hauntings, he was certainly skeptical, becoming more so as he grew older. The skepticism finds its way into A Christmas Carol, as illustrated by this passage:

“You don’t believe in me,” observed the Ghost.
“I don’t,” said Scrooge.
“What evidence would you have of my reality beyond that of your senses?”
“I don’t know,” said Scrooge.
“Why do you doubt your senses?”
“Because,” said Scrooge, “a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats.”

The power of Dickens’s ‘in person’ performances of his tales was notorious, and he enjoyed evoking emotions in his live audiences, as well as his readers, with ghostly stories. He performed his ghost-laden A Christmas Carol reading 127 times and, after writing another Christmas book, The Chimes, gathered a crowd so he could test out the effects of the book.

Dickens was a lifelong admirer of ghostly fiction and influenced many who followed him, including Wilkie Collins and Elizabeth Gaskell. As a boy, Charles Dickens read the weekly horror magazine, The Terrific Register, later admitting that it had “frightened my very wits out of my head.” It is possible that its weekly publication influenced the way that Dickens marketed his own work, releasing his books in serial format. When he became an editor, a popular feature of his magazines Household Words and All the Year Round was the special Christmas number, which included, at various times, ghost stories by Elizabeth Gaskell, Wilkie Collins, Charles Collins, and Amelia B. Edwards.

Exhibition and Museum Information

To Be Read At Dusk: Dickens, Ghosts & the Supernatural
The Charles Dickens Museum, 48-49 Doughty Street, London WC1N 2LX
Dates: 5 October 2022 – 19 February 2023.
Opening hours: 10am to 5pm, Wednesday – Sunday (closed Mondays and Tuesdays)

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

A Summer of Special Events at the Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret

In its bicentenary year, Europe’s oldest operating theatre is welcoming visitors by day with new activities and by night to explore fascinating subjects in one of the most affecting and atmospheric historic settings in the country. As well as staging events on subjects wedded to its history, such as Victorian surgery and medicine and female health and anatomy, the stepped wooden theatre attic of St Thomas’ Church next to London Bridge station will become a venue for late events, talks and theatrical performances.

The Museum has launched a year of special bicentenary events, projects and new developments, including new installations, a full programme of events for visitors, a new guidebook and a research project designed to unearth the stories of the surgeons, nurses, students and patients who worked, studied or found themselves on the operating table at the theatre between 1822 and 1862.

From this summer, visitors to the Museum during daily opening hours will discover the stories of a series of historical characters, each of whom played their own varied roles on the site. Each visitor will be given their own character card on arrival and can choose to follow the lives and destinies of their adopted figure as they make their way around the Museum. Among the people featured are Ward Matron, Sarah Elizabeth Wardroper, patients Elizabeth Raigen and Amelia Jones, surgeon Benjamin Travers, medical student Hampton Weekes and porter James Smith.

The Museum will present a collection of medical exhibits from the collection of Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospital Trust. Chief among this collection of syringes, nipple shells, prescription spikes, medicine kits and apothecary bottles is a 16 th century pewter plate likely to have been used for feeding patients in the earliest days of the old St Thomas’ Hospital.

By day and after hours, the Old Operating Theatre becomes one of the most thrilling and unusual performance venues in the capital. Among the newly confirmed events:

Surgery & the Victorian Operating Theatre Live Event

Join us in the Old Operating Theatre, as we return to the Victorian era and reveal the surgical
procedures that happened before a large and noisy crowd in the attic space of an 18th centurychurch. You will explore the origins and history of Old St Thomas’ Hospital, before sitting in on demonstrations of the most common surgical procedures that too place in this original operating theatre 200 years ago, in the days before anaesthesia and antiseptics. Delve into the visceral horrors of surgery that helped pave the way to our modern medical procedures, in the oldest surviving surgical theatre in Europe. Dates: 30 th July, 27 th August, 24 th September, 29 th October, 26 th November.
10-11am. £12.

Vagina Obscura: How medicine “discovered” the clitoris

Female anatomy hasn’t changed much in the past two millennia—but our understanding of it certainly has. Join award-winning science journalist and author Rachel E. Gross on a journey into the past, present and future of perhaps the most-misunderstood organ in the human body: the clitoris.
Join us as we explore what scientists are finally learning about it, as well as how new insights about female genitals are helping medicine to better study and treat all bodies.
Date: 17 th August 2022. 7-8pm. £12.

Trephination for the Twenty-First Century

A one-woman exploration of invasive surgery combines psychological theory and theatrical technique to create an ardent and authentic performance of care. Amanda Grace’s work as a scholar of empathy and performer of care has been staged in fringe venues, around abandoned estates, and on proscenium stages across multiple continents. Date: 7th September 2022. 7-8pm. £20.

The Artificial Womb: In Conversation with Lisa Mandemaker. Virtual Event

An in-conversation event with Lisa Mandemaker, the designer of speculative project, the Artificial Womb. In the future, artificial wombs could replace incubators as they mimic the natural environment of the female uterus. But how will they look? And how should we respond to such technology if it comes knocking on our door? Date: 8th September 2022. 6-7pm. £5

MUSEUM LATE

A Quirky Evening at the Old Operating Theatre Museum & Herb Garret

Come and explore the Museum after dark, encounter the exhibitions at night (creepiness guaranteed!), grab a drink at the Apothecary Wine Bar, discover the tales of the bodysnatchers and participate in mysterious interactive experiences. Musical performance from Lunatraktors. A Museum late to celebrate the upcoming Autumn Equinox. Date: 21st September 2022. 7-9pm. £20.

Scenes from the City: A Civic Education

A new theatrical performance by Edward’s Boys, the all-boy company from King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon. Scenes from the City: A Civic Education explores how merchants were involved in the worlds of education and entertainment in early modern London. Edward’s Boys will present
ten scenes and songs from works by Thomas Middleton, Ben Jonson, and John Webster, ranging in tone from the celebratory to the bitterly satirical. Much of the material has not been publicly performed since the early seventeenth century. Date: 28th September 2022. 6.15-8.30pm. £20.

Circumcision on the Couch: The Cultural, Psychological and Gendered Dimensions of the World’s Oldest Surgery

Join us for a talk by Jordan Osserman about his recent book, Circumcision on the Couch. Penises, and the things people do with them, have been subjects of controversy for a long time. In this event, Jordan will make use of the surgical setting to bring to life some major themes of his book, including
the nineteenth-century transformation of circumcision from a religious rite to a medical procedure designed to cure ‘nervous illness’. The event will include a short performance, ‘The Foreskin Warriors’, by Greek performance art duo FYTA, and a panel discussion with scholars and clinicians.
Date: 29th September 2022. 6.15-8.15pm. £12.

Visitor Information
Address: Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret, 9a St Thomas Street, London, SE1 9RY.
Opening hours: Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, 10.30am – 5.00pm. Access is limited as
the Museum is in the attic space of a 320-year-old church. The entrance is via a 52-step narrow spiral
staircase. Admission: Adult: £7.50; Concessions: £6.00; Child 6-16 years: £4.50; Children under 6
years: Free; Family (2 adults, 2 children): £18.00.

For more information and tickets, visit the Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Summer Events 2022 at the Charles Dickens Museum

This summer, the Charles Dickens Museum at 48 Doughty Street puts on a series of special events celebrating the stories and characters created by one the world’s greatest ever authors and exploring life at the only surviving London home of Dickens and his family.

Twists & Turns

Oliver Twist is one of the most famous novels ever written, yet it was not entirely a work of fiction. Join the Museum for a Twists & Turns walking tour and discover the real-life events, happiness, tragedy, people and places that shaped the tale of an unlikely hero. Uncover the criminal underbelly of Victorian London, from the real site of Fagin’s den, to the remnants of London’s most shocking slums. An immersive tour bringing the book to life.
Dates: 28th August, 25th September at 11am. £12.

Evening tours of 48 Doughty Street

Experience the magic of Charles Dickens with an intimate guided tour of his home. Begin your evening with a complimentary glass of wine in our courtyard garden and café, before stepping back in time to experience the Georgian townhouse. Hear about Charles Dickens’s rise to fame, the lifestyle of early Victorians and pick up some family gossip along the way.
Dates: 24th August & 21st September at 6pm. Adult: £20; Concession – £15; Child (Under 16) – £15.

Pickwick’s Incredible Family Adventure

A day of adventures inspired by Charles Dickens’s first novel, The Pickwick Papers. Play Victorian games, tackle the Pickwick Museum trail and finish with a goodie bag. Over three consecutive days in the summer holidays, the Family Adventure will send families back in time to discover what life was really like in Victorian England.
Dates: 17th, 18th & 19th August from 10am until 5pm. Adult: £13.50; Child: £12.50.

Oh, Poo!

Quite the invitation, this…come and join the Museum as we dig through some Victorian ‘poo’. You’ll explore the Victorian diet, learn about how the rich and the poor ate different foods and once you’ve pondered all aspects of the ‘poo’, follow the new Toilet Trail (we’re so proud) around Dickens’s home to uncover the delightfully dreadful facts about how the Victorians kept clean and went to the loo! A wonderfully weird and fun family day.
Dates: 3rd August & 24th August. 10am, 11am, 12pm, 2pm and 3pm. Adult: £15; Concession: £12; Child: £10

The Great Dickens Adventure

Charles Dickens is one of the most famous writers of all time, but while his stories are so well known, how much do we know about the man? Join us as we explore the London of Dickens’s day, uncovering the places and people who helped shape the great writer. Beginning at the Museum and ending at Fleet Street, you’ll be immersed in the past as you discover Dickens’s route to fame and find out how his early years shaped his best-loved books. Date: 20th August at 11am. £12

The Housemaid’s Tour

She’s a busy woman, but if you promise to be clean and tidy, she might let you in for a sneaky tour! Step back in time to 1838 and enjoy a tour of Charles Dickens’s London home led by his own housemaid. Hear tales of Victorian life and Dickens family gossip, with a healthy dose of dry wit. An intimate and atmospheric tour – groups are kept at no more than 15 people – showing how the Dickenses lived and worked in London.
Date: 18th September at 10am, 11am or 12 noon. £15 Adult £12 Conc £8 child

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Milton Avery: American Colourist at the Royal Academy from 15 July – 16 October 2022

Milton Avery (1885 – 1965) has long been recognised in the United States as one of the most important and influential twentieth-century American artists. Avery’s compositions, taken from daily life and which include portraits and landscapes have a major influence on artistic generations.

Avery played a vital role in the development of Abstract Expressionism through his close association with some of the younger exponents of the movement, such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Adolph Gottlieb. His work defies easy categorisation; ranging between American Impressionism and Abstract Expressionism, although he was not formally associated with either movement.

Milton Avery: American Colourist at the Royal Academy will cover the full development of Avery’s career. He was famously prolific, and this survey will feature a careful selection of 70 works, including many of his celebrated paintings from 1910 to the 1960s. The last retrospective of his work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1982 and this will be the first ever solo exhibition of Milton Avery in Europe.

The first section, Early Work, will feature work from 1910 up until the late 1930s, covering his main themes; the landscape, the city and the domestic. A number of these works have never been publicly exhibited before. The influence of the American Impressionists and Avery’s early appreciation of the landscape will be revealed. Paintings will include Blossoming, 1918 through to Fishing Village, 1939.

In the second section, Portraits, there will be paintings of his family, friends and self-portraits. Featured here will be a portrait of his friends in The Dessert, 1939 and Self-Portrait, 1941. From the early 1940s he ceased formal portraiture but retained the figure in his work.

A section entitled Innovation in Colour and Form will chart the period of innovation from the mid-1940s when Avery developed a system of flattening the compositional forms of his paintings into abstracted tonal planes. It was this development which established him as a major American colourist. Key works in this section will include two portraits of his daughter March, Seated Girl with Dog, 1944, and March in Brown, 1954, as well as Husband and Wife, 1945.

And finally in Late Work, paintings from the 1950s to the early 1960s will reveal a continuing influence of European Modernism, particularly Henri Matisse, as Avery increasingly employed non-associative colours in his compositions. There is a strong focus on the landscape and a further paring down of the detail of the subject. These works will show the extent to which Avery perfected his unique ability to balance colour and form in increasingly abstracted compositions, as seen in Black Sea, 1959, and Boathouse by the Sea, 1959.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here