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Monthly Archives: October 2020

Exhibition Review: Turner’s Modern World at Tate Britain from 28 October 2020 – 7 March 2021

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents a landmark exhibition dedicated to JMW Turner (1775-1851), Turner’s Modern World explores how one of Britain’s greatest landscape painter found new ways to capture the tumultuous events of his day, from technology’s impact to the effects of modernisation on society. The exhibition brings together 160 key works, including major loans as well as paintings and rarely seen drawings from Tate’s Turner Bequest.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Turner lived through dramatic times when Britain was at war and revolutions and independence struggles took place around the world. He also witnessed the way that capitalism and the industrial revolution was transforming the world around him. Whilst many artists saw the changes with disgust and saw the destruction of the pastoral Britain they loved, Turner was fascinated how the industry and infrastructure were changing Britain’s landscape.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars inspired Turner’s work with paintings such as The Battle of Trafalgar 1806-8 and Field of Waterloo 1818, but he also depicted aspects of life and work in Britain before, during and after conflict.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition presents his recollections of wartime at home and his reflections on the reputations of Nelson, Napoleon and Wellington as well as on ordinary soldiers and civilians.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the Causes and Campaigns room, the exhibition reflects on Turner’s interest in social reform, including liberal and humanitarian causes such as Greek independence from Ottoman Turkey, the 1832 Reform Act and the abolition movement. Key works include The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons 1835, while A Disaster at Sea 1835 and Wreck of a Transport Ship c.1801  illustrates Turner’s interest in  maritime history.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final section of the exhibition brings a focus on Turner’s interest in steam technology and industrialisation, in many ways Turner’s late style was influenced by the modern world. In contrast with many of his contemporaries, Turner’s late work began to be less classical and more impressionistic with the emphasis of dynamic movement and vibrant colour. 

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Some of his major works are included in this section such as .Snow Storm 1842 as well as The Fighting ‘Téméraire’ 1839 and Rain, Steam and Speed 1844 on rare loan from the National Gallery.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition is a reminder of how innovative and in some ways how radical Turner was. Turner was generally well respected by other artists and the public but was often seen as a bit of an outsider. Therefore whilst other artists saw the industrial revolution as to be something to ignore, Turner was fascinated by the changes and tried to capture some visual record of the rapidly changing world.  This exhibition provides plenty of evidence of the wide range of the artist’s abilities and illustrates how Turner has become less of an outsider but rather recognised as a pioneer in developing new styles that would be taken up be the impressionists and others.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Autumn Events at the Charles Dickens Museum

This half-term the Charles Dickens Museum is inviting families into Dickens’s London townhouse for a new programme of bespoke family tours designed to unlock the history, atmosphere and stories contained within each room of Dickens’s home. Throughout October half-term, expert Museum guides will create tours of 48 Doughty Street (Dickens’s only surviving London house) especially for the people in each group. Children will also welcomed in for self-portrait art workshops, inspired by the Museum’s new exhibition, Technicolour Dickens.

In addition, virtual events include a tour of the Museum with a viewing of objects not normally on display and a special event on Dickens’s third daughter, Katey, led by writer, historian and Dickens’s great-great-great-granddaughter, Lucinda Hawksley.

Dining Room, Credit, Newangle Copyright, Charles Dickens Museum

Interactive Family Tours

For children aged between 5-11 and their families, the Museum is offering a new Interactive Family Tour. Each tour, for a maximum of six people, is designed specifically for your family group, and lets you explore Charles Dickens’s home with your own dedicated guide. Please note that children must be accompanied by at least one adult, and all members of the group must come from the same household or support bubble. Tickets must be booked in advance.

Dates: Tours are available on 26 Oct, 30 Oct and 1 Nov. Price: £60 per family ticket.

My Technicoloured Self

Are you aged 13-16? Are you interested in how the highs and lows of our mental health can affect our creativity? Would you enjoy having a go at creating a self-portrait to hang in the house of one of the most famous authors of all time? All art abilities are welcome, from absolute beginner to pro!

Dates: 27th– 29th Oct. Places available through application only.

Guided Virtual Tour of the Charles Dickens Museum

Join curator Louisa Price on a virtual, guided tour of 48 Doughty Street, the home of the great Victorian novelist, journalist, speechwriter and public reader, Charles Dickens. Join us as we explore the five floors of this Bloomsbury townhouse. We will visit the ground and first floor public rooms that reveal Charles and Catherine Dickens’s busy social life, and peek into the book-lined study where Dickens worked on the classics, Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby. In the basement’s bustling kitchen and wash house we will hear stories of the household’s servants and further up in the bedrooms we will learn about Dickens’s personal life and a tragedy that befell the family during their time here. Finally in the attic, secrets will be disclosed that were only revealed after the writer’s death in 1870. The Museum holds the world’s most comprehensive collection relating to Dickens and as part of this tour, Louisa will also show several treasures not usually on display. This is a live event and you can ask questions throughout the tour via a chat window as well as in a Q&A session at the end. Zoom is required to take part in this tour and discussion. A link to the Zoom session will be emailed to registrants the day before the session.

Date: Thursday 22nd October at 6pm and Tuesday 27th October at 3.30pm.

Tickets: £8 per person/ device. Duration: Approx. 60 minutes

Drawing Room – Credit, Siobhan Doran Photography Copyright, Charles Dickens Museum

Dickens’s Artistic Daughter – Katey

Join author, historian and Dickens descendant Lucinda Hawksley for a special virtual talk on Katey Dickens as we mark her birthday. On 29 October 1839, Catherine Dickens gave birth to her third child, a daughter they named Katey, who was born at 48 Doughty Street (now the Charles Dickens Museum). Katey Dickens grew up to become a famous artist – that is, famous in her own day, but almost entirely forgotten in the 21st century. Join us on what would have been her birthday to discover the intriguing story of Charles and Catherine Dickens’s artistic daughter.

This is a live event and you can ask questions throughout the tour via a chat window as well as in a Q&A session at the end. Zoom is required to take part in this tour and discussion. A link to the Zoom session will be emailed to registrants the day before the session.

Date: Thursday 29th October at 6pm. Tickets: £8 per person/ device

Duration: Approx. 60 minutes

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Charles Dickens Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Arctic: culture and climate at the British Museum from 22 Oct 2020 to 21 Feb 2021

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The British Museum presents the first major exhibition on the history of the Arctic and its indigenous peoples, through the lens of climate change and weather. The Arctic has been home to a number of communities for nearly 30,000 years, and the exhibition explores some of the cultures that have lived in one of the most dramatic environments on earth.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

With climate change transforming the Arctic at the fastest rate in human history. The exhibition entitled Arctic: culture and climate looks at the circumpolar region through the eyes of contemporary Arctic communities, revealing how Arctic peoples have adapted to climate change in the past and addresses the present crisis.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition brings together the largest and most diverse circumpolar collection ever displayed in the UK, including objects from the British Museum’s Arctic collection and international lenders and commissions, this exhibition reveals artistic expression and ecological knowledge, from the past right up to the present day.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Exhibits include rare 28,000 year old archaeological finds excavated from the thawing ground in Siberia, unique tools and clothing adapted for survival, artworks reflecting the respectful relationship between Arctic people and the natural world and photography of contemporary daily life.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Arctic Circle is the most northern region in the world which covers 4% of the Earth. It is home to 4 million people including 400,000 indigenous peoples belonging to one or more of 40 different ethnic groups with distinct languages and dialects. Most of the Arctic’s indigenous inhabitants rely on hunting, fishing and reindeer herding. These subsistence resources are supplemented by employment in industries such as government infrastructures, energy, commercial fishing and tourism. Arctic peoples have traded and engaged across the Circumpolar North for millennia. From Russia, Greenland, Canada and the USA to the Scandinavian nations, the peoples of the region have thrived within this ever-changing landscape.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features objects from across the circumpolar region, including an 8-piece Igloolik winter costume made of caribou (wild reindeer) fur. Animals provides food for the community as well as clothing, all available natural materials are put to use.

Other highlights include a delicate and unique household bag from western Alaska, crafted from tanned salmon skin, a Inughuit (Greenlandic) sled made from narwhal and caribou bone and pieces of driftwood which was traded to Sir John Ross on his 1818 expedition, marking the first encounter between Inughuit and Europeans.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Arctic peoples’ responses to the establishment of colonial governments and state-sponsored religions in the Arctic will feature, including a bronze carved Evenki spirit mask that was made from a 17th century Russian Orthodox icon.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many Arctic peoples are transforming traditional heritage to meet contemporary needs and the exhibition explores ritual practices to commercial artwork inspired by their storytelling and material traditions.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Stunning contemporary photography of the Arctic landscape provides a background to a wide range of of new artworks commissioned for the exhibition. These include a limestone Inuksuk, an iconic Arctic monument of stacked stones used to mark productive harvesting locations or to assist in navigation, built by Piita Irniq, from the Kivalliq Region of Nunavut, Canada.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A new installation from the art collective Embassy of Imagination will present traditional clothing made from Japanese paper and printmaking by Inuit youth in Kinngait (Cape Dorset) and Puvirnitug, Nunavut, Canada.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition provides a timely insight into an often neglected part of the world. The stories of the various communities provide evidence of the remarkable abilities of communities to deal with different kinds of change and developing strategies to make best use of change. Whilst climate change is often discussed in an abstract way and from little personal knowledge, we might be better to listen to communities that have survived the disruptive effects of social and environmental change and created thriving cultures.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition Programme 2021

Royal Academy of Arts Exhibition Programme 2021

The Royal Academy of Arts have just released their exhibition programme for 2021, it includes a mixture of old and new which provides plenty of opportunity for visitors to enjoy the art on show.

Francis Bacon: Man and Beast
Main Galleries
30 January – 18 April 2021

In January 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present Francis Bacon: Man and Beast, the first exhibition to chart the development of the artist’s work through the lens of his fascination with animals, and how this impacted upon his treatment of his ultimate subject: the human figure. Francis Bacon (1909–1992) is recognised as one of the most important artists of the twentieth century. This important exhibition will include 45 remarkable paintings spanning his career; from his earliest works of the 1930s and 40s through to the final painting he ever made in 1991, which will be exhibited publicly for the first time in the UK. Among the works, a trio of paintings of bullfights, all made in 1969, will also be displayed together for the first time.

Michael Armitage: Paradise Edict
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
13 March – 6 June 2021

In March 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of Kenyan-born artist Michael Armitage (b. 1984). Armitage graduated from the RA Schools in 2010 and now works between Nairobi and London. In his paintings, Armitage brings together the Western painting tradition (drawing on Titian, Goya, Manet and Gauguin among others) with East African contemporary art, popular culture and politics. Also on display will be a group of works by East African artists, such as Jak Katarikawe (1938-2018), Theresa Musoke (b. 1944) and Meek Gichugu (b. 1968), selected by Armitage for their importance to the development of figurative painting in Kenya and to his artistic development. Alongside his work, Armitage recently founded the Nairobi Contemporary Art Institute, a non-profit visual arts space.

David Hockney: The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
27 March – 22 August 2021

The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020 comprises a new body of work created by David Hockney RA during a period of intense activity at his home in Normandy and charts the unfolding and progression of spring. The period in which these works were made coincided with the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, where Hockney, along with the rest of Europe and much of the world, was in a state of lockdown. Faced with an unprecedented and perplexing period, Hockney’s focus on the emergence of spring instead celebrates the natural world and urges us, as he does himself in one of his frequently used phrases, to ‘love life’. The works have been ‘painted’ on an iPad, and then printed on paper at a large-scale.

Summer Exhibition 2021
Main Galleries
15 June – 17 August 2021

The Royal Academy’s annual Summer Exhibition, the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show, is now in its 253rd year. It provides a unique platform for emerging and established artists to showcase their works to an international audience, comprising a range of media from painting, printmaking and photography, to sculpture, architecture and film. It has been held each year without interruption since 1769. Around 1200 works will go on display, the majority of which will be for sale offering visitors an opportunity to purchase original work.

Milton Avery
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
3 July – 26 September 2021

Milton Avery (1885-1965) has long been recognised in the United States as one of the most important and influential twentieth-century American artists. Avery’s compositions, taken from daily life, including portraits and landscapes, are imbued with a colour sensibility, harmony and balance which was to have a major influence on the next artistic generation. Avery played a vital role in the development of Abstract Expressionism, through his close association with some of the younger exponents of the movement, such as Mark Rothko, Barnett Newman and Adolph Gottlieb. The last retrospective of his work was held at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1982 and this will be the first solo exhibition of Milton Avery in Europe.

Marina Abramović: After Life
Main Galleries
25 September – 12 December 2021

In September 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed performance artist Marina Abramović Hon RA. The exhibition will be Abramović’s first major survey in the UK, bringing together key works spanning her entire career. The exhibition will explore how Abramović captures and defines performance art through photographs, videos, objects, installations and live re-performances of her work, reflecting Abramović’s interest in the legacy of performance art.

Herzog & de Meuron
The Jillian and Arthur M. Sackler Wing of Galleries
23 October 2021 – 23 January 2022

In Autumn 2021, the Royal Academy of Arts will present an exhibition of the critically acclaimed architectural practice Herzog & de Meuron, founded in Basel in 1978. With projects across the globe, the work of the practice continues to astound and inspire, as they transform what might otherwise be an ordinary condition or material into something extraordinary that engages with the senses. Notable projects include Tate Modern, London (2000 and 2016) and the National Stadium, Beijing (2008). In this exhibition at the Royal Academy, Herzog & de Meuron will explore ways of exhibiting architecture at this critical moment in time.

Late Constable
The Gabrielle Jungels-Winkler Galleries
30 October 2021 – 13 February 2022

In 2021, the Royal Academy will present an exhibition on the late work of John Constable (1776-1837). The exhibition’s point of departure is the last of Constable’s celebrated six-foot Suffolk canal scenes, The Leaping Horse, one of the highlights of the RA’s collection, first exhibited in 1825. It is in this painting that, by inserting the detail of the tower of Dedham Church, Constable first departs from the notion of topographical accuracy which had been a hallmark of his work until that date. Distinguished by its rich technical vocabulary, the artist’s late work, though often conservative in subject matter, becomes increasingly expressive in style. The exhibition will explore Constable’s late career, from 1825 until his unexpected death in 1837, through his paintings and oil sketches as well as watercolours, drawings and prints.

RA Schools Show 2021
RA Schools Studios and Weston Studio
17 – 27 June 2021

The RA Schools Show is the annual exhibition of works by artists graduating from the UK’s longest established contemporary art school, the RA Schools. The show will present work by emerging artists in a range of media with each exhibiting in solo spaces in the rarely-seen working studios within the Royal Academy.

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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THE END by Heather Phillipson on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

THE END, a new artwork by artist Heather Phillipson was unveiled on Thursday 30 July, on the Fourth Plinth in London’s Trafalgar Square.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It is the 13th Fourth Plinth commission since the programme began in 1998, it is also the tallest to date, measuring 9.4m and weighing 9 tonnes, and follows on from The Invisible Enemy Should Not Exist by Michael Rakowitz. Both artists were selected in 2017 by the Fourth Plinth Commission Group, following an exhibition at the National Gallery where 10,000 people voted for their favourite shortlisted artwork.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Heather Phillipson’s sculpture tops the Fourth Plinth with a giant swirl of whipped cream, a cherry, a fly and a drone that transmits a live feed of Trafalgar Square. The sculpture Entitled THE END illustrates Trafalgar Square as a site of celebration and protest, the live feed of Trafalgar Square picked up by the drone’s camera is visible on a dedicated website giving a sculpture’s eye perspective.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Heather Phillipson was born in London, where she lives and works. Her works include video, sculpture, web projects, music, drawing and poetry.

© 2020 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

THE END is the first fully accessible commission on the Fourth Plinth. There is a braille panel included on the plaque, a tactile image of the work, and an audio description of the work on the GLA’s website

The Fourth Plinth as it is known has quite an unusual history, it was intended to be used for a equestrian statue of William IV astride a bronze horse to match the statue of George IV which is on the other side of the square. However George IV spent so much money during his reign that there was not enough funds left for the statue.
Remarkably, considering the square is a major public area, the plinth was empty for more than 150 years. Eventually it was decided that temporary modern pieces of work would occupy the plinth. The final choice is often controversial but is a focus of interest which generates considerable media interest.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Michael Clark: Cosmic Dancer at the Barbican Art Gallery from 7 October 2020 – 3 January 2021

Photograph Hugh Glendinning

Barbican Art Gallery stages the first ever major exhibition on the groundbreaking dancer and choreographer Michael Clark. The exhibition entitled Michael Clark: Cosmic Dancer explores Clark’s unique combination of classical and contemporary culture.

The exhibition features a large number of striking portraits of Clark through the eyes of collaborators and world-renowned artists including Charles Atlas, BodyMap, Leigh Bowery, Duncan Campbell, Peter Doig, Cerith Wyn Evans, Sarah Lucas, Silke Otto-Knapp, Elizabeth Peyton, The Fall and Wolfgang Tillmans.

2020 marks the 15th year of Michael Clark Company’s collaboration with the Barbican as an Artistic Associate. This exhibition, one of the largest surveys ever dedicated to a living choreographer, presents a comprehensive story of Clark’s career to date and development as a
pioneer of contemporary dance to films, sculptures, paintings and photographs by his collaborators across visual art, music and fashion.

Michael Clark during the filming of Charles Atlas Hail the New Puritan 1986 Photograph Alexander James

The exhibition features a new commission A Prune Twin (2020), by pioneering filmmaker, video artist and long-term collaborator Charles Atlas. This large-scale film installation will immerse audiences into Clark’s early work and provide an opportunity to revisit Atlas’ ‘Love letter to London’ Hail the New Puritan (1986) and Because We Must (1989). Featuring outrageous costumes and sets, Clark’s choreography
challenged notions of gender, conformity and conservative values within the context of Thatcher’s Britain. A section of the exhibition will be dedicated to Clark’s landmark performance I Am Curious, Orange (1988).

I Am Curious, Orange, 1988, Photographer Richard Haughton

The exhibition showcases a rare collection of Leigh Bowery’s provocative costumes which proved integral to Clark’s vision and radically disrupted the traditions of the dance world. These include the iconic bottomless leotards from New Puritans (1984) whose choreography was in turn inspired by The Fall’s postpunk compositions.

Clark’s friendship with Sarah Lucas resulted in a shared exploration of the human body and sexuality across sculpture and dance. Lucas has conceived two installations for the exhibition inspired by their friendship and collaboration on Before and After: The Fall (2001). These include a series of hand gestures, cigarette sculptures and a wanking arm as sculptural metaphors of Clark’s choreography, as well as a parodic casting of Clark’s body sitting on a toilet (Cnut, 2004).

Elizabeth Peyton’s and Wolfgang Tillmans’ portraits of Clark capture the naked intimacy of the artist as a human being, whereas Peter Doig’s painting, which seems to merge Clark’s face with that of Le Corbusier, is a playful rendering of their shared interest in the famed architect of the CitéRadieuse in Marseille. Doig’s Portrait (Corbusier) (2009) is exhibited in dialogue with 16mm footage of Clark’s dancers performing a choreography on the roof of the iconic modernist building in 2008, presented for the first time and resulting from a close dialogue with Clark and Michael Clark Company.

In 2005 Michael Clark Company became an Artistic Associate of the Barbican and embarked on The Stravinsky Project, a three-year collaboration to create a trilogy of works to seminal dance scores by Igor Stravinsky. Clark’s investigation of classical ballet vocabulary, extreme discipline and technical virtuosity in this trilogy inspired Silke Otto Knapp’s new series of paintings commissioned for the exhibition.

There is a section dedicated to Michael Clark Company’s archive of ephemera, posters and programmes highlighting the exposure of the company across Europe’s most renowned theatre venues.

The exhibition showcases a large selection of archival film documentation, focusing on Clark’s work with filmmakers (Peter Greenaway, Derek Jarman), fashion designers (Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen, Gucci) and musicians (Scritti Politti, Laibach, Bruce Gilbert from Wire). The archive also displays a selection of interviews with Clark, as well as the documentary The Late Michael Clark (2001) by filmmaker Sophie Fiennes and the recent BBC recording of Clark’s to a simple, rock ‘n’ roll . . . song. (2016) set to the music of Erik Satie, Patti
Smith and David Bowie.

For more information and tickets , visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Bruce Nauman at Tate Modern from 7 October 2020 to 21 February 2021

Tate Modern presents the first exhibition to show the full breadth of work by Bruce Nauman in London for more than 20 years. Nauman’s body of work encompasses a range of media including sculpture, sound, film, video and neon.

Since the late 1960s, Nauman has been known for inventing new ways to tell his narratives. He is now widely recognised as one of the most innovative and influential artists of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The exhibition features more than 40 works, the exhibition explores a number of themes that have preoccupied Nauman during his 50-year career.

The exhibition begins with MAPPING THE STUDIO II with color shift, flip, flop & flip/flop (Fat Chance John Cage) 2001, a major moving-image installation .

A selection of early and iconic artworks such as Henry Moore Bound to Fail 1967/70 and A Cast of the Space Under My Chair 1965/68 highlights Nauman’s interest in conceptual art and performance.

Nauman has created several neon signs that combine text and colour to reveal everyday phrases and expressions. Some examples in the exhibition include The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truth (Window or Wall Sign) 1967, Human Nature Knows/Doesn’t Know 1983/86 and One Hundred Live and Die 1984.

Large-scale works such as Going Around the Corner Piece with Live and Taped Monitors 1970 and Double Steel Cage Piece 1974 reflect Nauman’s interest in surveillance and over zealous societal control.

These themes continue in the whole-room installation Shadow Puppets and Instructed Mime 1990 in which suspended wax heads, sound and video, provide a backdrop as a disembodied male voice gives commands to a female mime projected onto the walls.

Anthro/Socio (Rinde Spinning) 1992 reveals how Nauman consistently challenges the conventions of the gallery experience and confronts viewers directly.

Black Marble Under Yellow Light 1981/1988 illustrates how Nauman explores space and light.

Falls, Pratfalls and Sleights of Hand (Clean Version) 1993, the final room in the show, illustrates how themes of human perception have inspired Nauman throughout his career.

This imaginative exhibition provides plenty of evidence of how Nauman was one of the early artists to explore some of the effects of the digital revolution and how it would affect our perception of our physical and psychological place in the world. Many of the installations present an unnerving view of the future where humans are almost a ghost in the machine desperate to be heard but forever being distorted.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here