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Monthly Archives: September 2019

As The Crow Flies art exhibition at Severndroog Castle from 6th October to 1st December 2019

Severndroog Castle presents the ‘As The Crow Flies’ digital art installation this Autumn and Winter created by Jini Rawlings, who is a mixed media and video installation artist. Rawlings’ art uses projections and materials to suggest the multi layering of memory and meaning, creating poetic responses to stories found in original archives.

The installation is based on three different ‘narratives’, which are linked by location and their different relationships to the Honourable East India Company; linking these stories with the history of Severndroog Castle itself.

Severndroog is a tower built in the 18th century situated in the Oxleas Woods in the Royal Borough of Greenwich. Built on Shooters Hill, one of the highest points in the city, the viewing platform boasts some of the most spectacular views in London.

Event Details:

Every Sunday from 6th October until 1st December 2019.
Opening hours: 6th – 20th Oct 10.30am – 4.30pm; 27th Oct to 1st Dec 10.30am – 3.30pm
At Severndroog Castle. Castlewood, Shooters Hill, London SE18 3RT

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Cake and Bake Show at ExCel London – 4th to 6th October 2019

One of the UK’s biggest baking events returns to ExCeL with the Cake and Bake Show on the 4th-6th October and offers visitors the chance to enjoy all things baking, decorating and sugarcraft related. The popularity of Bake Off and other related television programmes has seen a major growth of interest in these types of shows which provide a dazzlingly array of cakes and other foodie delights.

Always popular are the expert demonstrations and talks that take place in a number of locations throughout the show. Some of the biggest names will appear at the show including Eric Lanlard, Rosemary Shrager, John Whaite, Candice Brown, Paul Jagger, Britt Box, Andrew Thwaite, Molly Robbins, Selasi Gbormittah, Louise Dawson,  Briony May Williams and Rosie Cake Diva.

The Cake and Bake Stage is where a full programme of stars from the baking world will take to the stage in a series of demos.

Le Cordon Bleu have an array of activities at this year’s Cake & Bake Show. The institute pastry chefs will teach you key techniques,  Le Cordon Bleu Master Chefs host a series of free demonstrations and you can learn their techniques in workshops.

The show allows you to see some of the stunning cakes produced by professionals and amateurs, this year’s theme is ‘Illusion Cakes’.  There will also be a large display of wedding and birthday cakes.

If you are feeling a little peckish, walk around the large number of  market stands to sample a tasty and mouth-watering array of freshly baked produce from the country’s leading artisan bakers and cake makers. The stalls also offer those hard to get accessories and give some insights into some of the latest baking trends from cake experts and master bakers alike.

The Cake & Bake Show offers a family day out where children have their own Kid’s Zone with lots of fun activities for little bakers including icing and decorating sweet treats.

If you would like to pamper yourself, enjoy a drink at the Champagne Bar and have your nails done at the Cake & Bake Pamper Lounge.

The Cake & Bake Show provides plenty of interest with lots of demonstrations and events for those who want to gain or refine their baking skills. It would also appeal to those who want to sample some of delicious products on offer. If you need to find that certain piece of equipment, a vast range of products and accessories are available to buy from the extensive shopping area. The popularity of the show provides plenty of evidence that the ‘baking boom’ is still going strong and the event appeals to a wide range of people.

For more information , visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review – Mark Leckey: O’ Magic Power of Bleakness at Tate Britain from 24 September 2019 to 5 January 2020

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Britain presents O’ Magic Power of Bleakness, a new exhibition by Mark Leckey, the artist has created an immersive installation combining new and existing works which unfold over time to create a son et lumière (sound and light) experience.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Leckey returns to the Tate Britain for the first time since he won the Turner Prize in 2008, the artist is known for his exploration of ideas of youth, class, memory and nostalgia.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

For this exhibition, Leckey fills the gallery space with a life-sized replica of a section of the M53, a motorway flyover close to his childhood home on the Wirral where he used to play with his friends. Underneath this bridge Leckey premieres a new audio-visual installation Under Under In 2019, inspired by a supernatural encounter he believed he had under the bridge as a child. The effect of this encounter is the bridge has become a recurring motif within his work. The ‘bridge’ becomes  a theatrical set with video projections and using a 19th-century illusion technique known as Pepper’s Ghost. Tied to the visual effects is  a new audio play that follows five teenagers under a haunted motorway bridge.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Alongside this new work, the exhibition also features large-scale projections of two of Leckey’s works: Fiorucci Made Me Hardcore 1990 and Dream English Kid, 1964 – 1999 AD 2015.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Leckey’s video Fiorucci is a compilation of footage from dance floors chronicling Britain’s underground club scene from the 1970s to the 1990s.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In Dream English Kid the artist’s personal memories are explored through material found online, inspired by his discovery of a YouTube video showing a Joy Division gig he attended as a teenager.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although all three works can be viewed as independent pieces, they do present a cycle of experiences that explore social history, memories, subcultures, experiences and digital technologies.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This thought provoking and unusual exhibition takes the visitor into a large dimly lit space with screens providing videos which bring together lives of mainly young people and some of the digital images they were constantly bombarded with by different media formats. As you watch the videos, it is noticeable that over time, the collective experience has changed to a more individual experience. This has profound consequences for society, the ties that once bound us all together are being unravelled in a cyberspace where even your individual identity and reality is being questioned.

The full running time of O’ Magic Power of Bleakness is approx. 55 minutes with a 5-minute interval between cycles. The work begins on the hour, every hour.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Tim Walker: Wonderful Things at the Victoria and Albert Museum from 21 September 2019 to 8 March 2020

© Tim Walker Studio

The V&A presents the largest-ever exhibition on photographer Tim Walker with over 150 new works inspired by its collection from the 21st September 2019.

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

At the heart of the exhibition are 10 major new photographic projects, directly influenced by treasures in the V&A’s vast collection. Walker visited object stores and conservation studios, meeting many of the museum’s curators, conservators and technicians. He scoured the V&A’s 145 public galleries, scaled the roof of the 12-acre South Kensington site, and explored the labyrinth of Victorian passages below ground level. Along the way, he encountered luminous stained-glass windows, vivid Indian miniature paintings, jewelled snuffboxes, erotic illustrations, golden shoes, and a 50-metre-long photograph of the Bayeux Tapestry, the largest photograph in the museum’s collection. These and many other rare artefacts have inspired Walker’s monumental new photographs, and feature in the exhibition designed by leading British creative, Shona Heath.

The exhibition showcases over 300 items, encompassing photographs and the V&A objects that inspired them, short films, photographic sets and props, scrapbooks and sketches.

© Tim Walker Studio

Heath’s spectacular design guides visitors on a journey through Walker’s world. Text written by Walker adds personal insight and celebrates the talents of the many collaborators who help bring his ideas to life, including stylists and creatives Katy England, Amanda Harlech and Jerry Stafford, and hair and make-up artists Malcolm Edwards, Julien d’Ys, isshehungry and Sam Bryant, among others.

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The exhibition begins with 100 pictures from Walker’s previous projects and extracts from his Super 8 films. Walker first came to prominence in the 1990s with his unique approach to visual storytelling, blurring fantasy and reality to create pictures that can be surreal, lavish, humorous and touching.

These images include some of the biggest names in fashion: models including Edie Campbell, Lily Cole, Karen Elson and Stella Tennant and designers including Alexander McQueen, Balenciaga, Comme des Garçons and Rick Owens.

The first room of the exhibition displays fashion stories alongside portraits of luminaries such as Sir David Attenborough, Peter Blake and David Hockney, and a constellation of performers including Riz Ahmed, Cate Blanchett, Björk, Timothée Chalamet, Beth Ditto, Daniel Day-Lewis, Claire Foy, Saoirse Ronan and Solange Knowles.

Illuminations, which evokes the interior of a burned-out cathedral. On display are sixteenth-century stained glass panels and an exquisite illuminated manuscript made in the 1470s for the Duchess of Brittany.

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Another room, Pen & Ink, takes the whiplash graphic lines of Aubrey Beardsley’s provocative illustrations from the 1890s as a starting point.

Handle with Care, takes inspiration from the work of the V&A’s textile conservators who care for the museum’s world-leading fashion and textiles collection.

Towards the end of the exhibition, visitors enter a pastel-hued room reminiscent of a grand country house. A film projection flickers within a vast fireplace and the walls are hung with multiple portraits inspired by Edith Sitwell’s clothing and jewellery in the V&A’s collection.

Beyond the exhibition, several of Walker’s film installations appear throughout the museum’s permanent galleries, including the Tapestries Gallery and Norfolk House Music Room.

The exhibition Tim Walker: Wonderful Things runs from 21 September 2019 to 8 March 2020.

For more information and tickets, visit the V & A website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Exhibition Review: Antony Gormley at the Royal Academy from 21 September to 3 December 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents a solo exhibition of the internationally acclaimed British sculptor Antony Gormley. In one of the artist’s most significant exhibitions in the UK for over a decade, Gormley uses all 13 rooms  in the RA’s Main Galleries to experiment with scale, darkness, light, and using a variety of materials.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The early galleries feature rarely-exhibited works from the late 1970s and early 1980s Works l include Land, Sea and Air, 1977-79 and Fruits of the Earth, 1978-79 in which natural and man-made objects are wrapped in lead.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

There is also a series of concrete works from the 1990s including Flesh, 1990 . Each volume contains the body form as a void in a position that tests the enclosing mass. The interior is only visible through the hands, feet or head that break the surface of the block.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors are encouraged to engage with a number of whole-room installations like Cave 2019, some installations have been specially  reconfigured for the RA’s galleries.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Lost Horizon I, 2008  features 24 cast iron figures set in different orientations on every wall, floor and ceiling.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Clearing VII, 2019 consists of kilometres of coiled, flexible aluminium tubing arcing from floor to ceiling and wall to wall; a ‘drawing in space’ which encircles the visitor.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Matrix III, 2019 is a cloud of intersecting rectangular dark steel mesh suspended above head height.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Host, 2019 fills an entire gallery to a depth of 23cm with a vast expanse of seawater and clay.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

At the centre of the exhibition in the Central Hall are two of Gormley’s early ‘expansion’ works; Body and Fruit, both from 1991-3, these hollow pieces have the characteristics of both bomb and fruit that weighs several tonnes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although known for his sculptures, the exhibition explores Gormley’s  works on paper which illustrate the importance of drawing for the artist. The exhibition features early drawings such as Mould, 1981. Body and Light drawings, the Linseed Oil Works (1985-1990) such as Double Moment, 1987, and the Red Earth drawings (1987-1998). The displays of Gormley’s workbooks reveal the artist’s continual investigation experimentation of ideas that often lead to the sculptural works.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition provides an opportunity to explore the range of works by Antony Gormley. Although the artist is widely known for the Angel of the North and Another Place sculptures, this exhibition takes the visitor on a journey in which they are asked to interact with their surroundings in a number of ways. Gormley fills some of the exhibition spaces with a series of installations that take over the entire room and questions our perception of ourselves and pieces of art.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Tower Hill Memorial

 

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

London has many memorials to those who have been killed in the First and Second World Wars, however one of the largest and probably least known in the Tower Hill Memorial. Located in Trinity Square in front of Trinity House, The Tower Hill Memorial is actually two major Commonwealth War Graves Commission memorials. The memorials are dedicated to civilian merchant sailors and fishermen who were killed as a result of enemy action and have no known grave.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The first memorial is the Mercantile Marine War Memorial which covers the First World War was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and unveiled in 1928 and the Merchant Seamen’s Memorial which covers the Second World War was designed by Sir Edward Maufe and unveiled in 1955. There is a smaller third memorial which was added to the site in 2005 which commemorates merchant sailors who were killed in the 1982 Falklands War.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The memorials bring to the attention of the public the heavy losses sustained by merchant shipping. In the First World War it was estimated that 17,000 lives and over 3000 British and Empire registered commercial vessels where sunk as a result of enemy action. Merchant shipping losses in the Second World War were significantly higher with 4,786 ships sunk, with the loss of some 32,000 lives.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The site was chosen because of its long maritime history with Trinity House being built in 1796 and the land was owned by the Crown who gave permission for the memorials after a special Act of Parliament was required.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Mercantile Marine War Memorial is a classical style corridor with bronze panels on the wall which have the names of the missing.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Merchant Seamen’s Memorial was intended to complement the first memorial and features a sunken garden, around the walls of the garden are bronze panels with the names of the missing. Among the panels are relief sculptures by Charles Wheeler representing the seven seas and two sentries, a Merchant Navy sailor and officer stand at the top of the steps.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Merchant Navy Association unveiled the Falklands memorial which is the work of Gordon Newton in 2005. It consists of a 3-metre bronze sundial on a granite base with a large bronze anchor in the centre of the dial and bronze plaques around the base which record the names of the dead.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Another memorial in the complex reminds visitors that this was the site of the Tower Hill scaffold where over 100 people were executed.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Despite being close to the Tower of London and Tower Bridge, the memorials are often overlooked by visitors but are often visited by those who have lost friends and relatives in the Merchant Navy. Because those commemorated have no known grave, these memorials are an important spot for people to reflect on the loss of their loved ones.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Portrait of the artist: Käthe Kollwitz at the British Museum from 12 September 2019 to 12 January 2020

The British Museum presents Portrait of the artist: Käthe Kollwitz, although Kollwitz (1867–1945) is not widely known in the UK, she is widely admired for her prints that depicting universal human experiences in a compelling way. Her work has rarely been seen together, this exhibition is the first to be devoted to Kollwitz alone in the UK since 1995 and will display 48 of her works.
This exhibition focuses on works, 47 prints and one drawing, almost entirely drawn from the British Museum’s Kollwitz collection, celebrating the enduring impact of Kollwitz’s images.
The Kollwitz works from the British Museum’s collection were largely acquired by Campbell Dodgson, former Keeper of the Department of Prints and Drawings (1893–1932) and bequeathed to the British Museum in 1948. Dodgson bought Kollwitz’s prints in Germany before the First World War, influenced by his colleague Max Lehrs of the Dresden and Berlin Print Rooms, one of Kollwitz’s first and greatest champion.
The exhibition displays this work grouped as: Self-portraits, A Weavers’ Revolt, Death and the Mother, ‘The many silent and noisy tragedies of life in a big city’, Peasants War, and Woodcuts, War and Remembrance. The final section includes her memorial sheet to Karl Liebknecht, the left-wing political activist murdered with Rosa Luxemburg by Government forces on 15 January 1919, alongside the portfolio Krieg.
Käthe Kollwitz (née Schmidt) was born in Königsberg Germany between 1871 and 1945. After studying art in Berlin and Munich, in 1891 she moved permanently to Berlin when she married Karl Kollwitz, a doctor in a poor working class district. Kollwitz found her artistic expression with numerous self-portraits and developing an interest in the women amongst the working class. The exhibition explores themes related to the artist from self portraits, poverty-stricken women she encountered in Berlin, to powerful scenes of maternal grief, along with social and economic protest.
One of the highlights of the exhibition are three rare working states of her famous print Woman with Dead Child (1903). This composition was based on drawings of herself holding her son Peter when he was seven years old. A mother’s grief was a recurring theme especially during and after the First World War.
Another highlight is the entire suite of seven woodcuts from the portfolio Krieg (War), shown exclusively at the British Museum for this final part of the exhibition’s run. Published in 1923, Krieg depicts the emotional anguish over the consequences of war for those left behind.
Kollwitz’s work began to be recognized after the First World War, firstly in Germany and then in Russia, China and the United States. Kollwitz’s was seen as a champion of working class struggle in the communist countries and beyond. However in the late 20th century, an enlarged version of her ‘Pietà’, a sculpture of a mother with dead son (1937–39), was installed in the Neue Wache in Berlin in 1993 as a memorial to all victims of war and tyranny.
Her ability to recognise the role women had to deal with, especially in war has seen her being identified as a feminist icon and interest in her work has grown considerably into the 21st century.
This fascinating free exhibition provides an opportunity to explore the works of Käthe Kollwitz. Although the artist provides some insights into the political and social turmoil in Germany in the early 20th century, it is often the universal themes of grief and compassion that provide the greater impact.
This exhibition has already been seen almost 90,000 people across four UK venues (Ikon Gallery (Birmingham), Young Gallery (Salisbury), Glynn Vivian Art Gallery (Swansea), Ferens Art Gallery (Hull)) between September 2017 and September 2018. The exhibition finishes its UK tour at the British Museum.
Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended 

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – Pushing paper: contemporary drawing from 1970 to now at the British Museum from 12 September 2019 to 12 January 2020

The British Museum has co-curated an exhibition with partner museums from around the UK to display and then tour contemporary artworks from its Prints and Drawings collection. The exhibition entitled Pushing paper: contemporary drawing from 1970 to now illustrates the breadth and quality of the Museum’s collection of modern art.
The exhibition of 56 works showcases the astonishing diversity of contemporary drawing over the last fifty years, with works by established artists such as David Hockney, Rachel Whiteread, Sol LeWitt, Anish Kapoor, Tracey Emin and Grayson Perry, as well as works by emerging artists like Hamid Sulaiman and Rachel Duckhouse. Many of these pieces will be on public display for the first time, including work by Gwen Hardie, Jonathan Callan and Jan Vanriet.
Even in a digital world, drawing is still popular with many artists for experimentation and using the medium as a means to examine the modern world. The exhibition is grouped into thematic areas examining Identity, Place and Space, Time and Memory, Power and Protest, and Systems and Process, and explores the different artists use the medium of drawing as a means of artistic expression.

Highlights of the exhibition include:

Maggi Hambling’s My Mother Dead (1988)
Grayson Perry’s Untitled (1985)
Edward Allington’s Leicester (2005)
Judy Chicago’s piece Driving the World to Destruction (1983).
Minjung Kim’s Mountain (2009)
This fascinating free exhibition explores the ways that drawing as a medium has developed in many areas in the late 20th century/ early 21st century. What was mostly associated with artists experimentation and preparation for paintings has now developed into many other areas. The diverse works in the exhibition by many well known artists show this process at work.
After its run at the British Museum , Pushing paper will go on to travel to four UK venues from February 2020 to March 2021: The Oriental Museum in Durham between 29 February and 17 May 2020, Pier Arts Centre in Stromness on 13 June until 5 September 2020, Glynn Vivian Art Gallery, Swansea from 19 September until 29 November 2020, and finally Cooper Gallery in Barnsley between 9 December 2020 and 6 March 2021.
Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended 

For more information and tickets, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Hidden London: London’s Lighthouse in Blackwall

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Thames has been a highway for shipping for centuries, however the river is not considered a dangerous river to navigate. Therefore it is a suprise that near Blackwall which is around six miles from the centre of London is a lighthouse.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The lighthouse is located in Trinity Buoy Wharf which for centuries was occupied by the Corporation of Trinity House and used for storing buoys and other marine equipment with workshops for testing, repairing and making equipment.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In the 19th century, a lighthouse was built, not to aid the Thames river traffic but as an experimental lighthouse. In the original lighthouse built in the 1850s,famous scientist Michael Faraday carried out tests in electric lighting for lighthouses. The present lighthouse was constructed in 1864 and was used to experiment with electric light and different coloured lights, the results being checked at Charlton across the river. After the Second World War, the lighthouse was used for the training of lighthouse keepers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The lighthouse and the workshops were closed in 1988 and the area was acquired by the London Docklands Development Corporation. In 1998, Urban Space Holdings Ltd took control of the site on a long lease. The site has been, and continues to be, developed as “a centre for the arts and cultural activities”.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Inside the Lighthouse is the Longplayer installation, which has been running since the 31st December 1999. In addition to the listening post, there are 234 singing bowls, used as a part of the 66-foot-wide orchestral instrument to perform Longplayer Live, are on display. The steel structure, designed by Ingrid Hu, was commissioned to display and store the bowls and was installed in autumn 2012. Each tier of the structure, containing 39 bowls positioned sequentially, corresponds to one of the six concentric rings of the Longplayer Live instrument. Longplayer is programmed so it will not stop until 2999.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Lighthouse is the main attraction in Trinity Buoy Wharf but there are a number of other attractions including a small installation in shed called the Faraday Effect, an old Trinity lighthouse ship which has been turned into a Music Recording Studio, Old shipping containers have been painted and made into office blocks called Container City.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

But perhaps the last thing you would expect to find in such a place is the Fatboy’s Diner, a genuine 1940s American Diner from New Jersey that was bought over from the States then had a few short stays in different parts of London before finding its present site. The Diner itself is a bit of a celebrity featuring in the film Sliding Doors, music videos and magazines.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Trinity Buoy Wharf is located near to the financial district of Canary Wharf and visitors can enjoy great views of the Thames and the O2 whilst drinking a milkshake at an original American Diner next to a lighthouse.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Hidden London: The Strange Story of Bleeding Heart Yard

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
There are places in London that on the surface are quite ordinary and not worth a second glance but scratch below the surface and you may be surprised by what you find.
© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
Bleeding Heart Yard is one of these places, it is a fairly anonymous cobbled courtyard off Greville Street in the Farringdon area of the City of London. The courtyard was probably named after a 16th-century inn sign displayed on a pub called the Bleeding Heart. It was said that the sign showed the heart of the Virgin Mary pierced by five swords.
© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
There is still a Bleeding Heart Tavern in front of the courtyard and visitors will notice the heart motif as they wander around. It is not by accident because the area was known for the gruesome ‘murder’ of Lady Elizabeth Hatton, relative of Sir Christopher Hatton (known as the dancing ‘Chancellor’ during the reign of Elizabeth I). He lived in nearby Ely Place and owned much of the area around Hatton Garden. It is said that her body was found here in 1626, “torn limb from limb, but with her heart still pumping blood.”
The origins of the legend is not known but a well known version of the story was published in the early 19th century as one of the Ingoldsby Legends by Richard Barham. In a story entitled  The House-Warming!!: A Legend Of Bleeding-Heart Yard.
In this version, Sir Christopher Hatton marries Alice Fanshawe, who is suspected of having made a deal with the Devil so that her husband will have success at the court of Elizabeth I. Sir Christopher success leads to him becoming Lord Chancellor, and the Queen forces the Bishops of Ely to give Sir Christopher the keys to their London residence at Ely Place.
© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
However, when the Hattons celebrate their good fortune at their housewarming they have an unwelcome visitor who wants to dance with Alice, the Devil it seems wants Alice to pay her part of the contract.
Of poor Lady Hatton, it’s needless to say,
No traces have ever been found to this day,
Or the terrible dancer who whisk’d her away;
But out in the court-yard — and just in that part
Where the pump stands — lay bleeding a LARGE HUMAN HEART!
And sundry large stains
Of blood and of brains,
Which had not been wash’d off notwithstanding the rains,
Appear’d on the wood, and the handle, and chains,
As if somebody’s head with a very hard thump,
Had been recently knock’d on the top of the pump.
Like many legends, there are elements of truth and more than a splash of fantasy. While it was true that Sir Christopher Hatton did benefit from Queen Elizabeth’s patronage and did receive Ely Place from the Bishop of Ely.
Other parts of the story are a confusion of the various Christopher Hattons and Lady Hattons, no Lady Hatton was murdered in Bleeding Heart Yard in 1626.
© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
Richard Barham was not the only author attracted to this peculiar corner of London, Bleeding Heart Yard features in the Charles Dickens novel Little Dorrit as the home of the Plornish family. Dickens describes the yard and its name.
Bleeding Heart Yard was to be found; a place much changed in feature and in fortune, yet with some relish of ancient greatness about it. Two or three mighty stacks of chimneys, and a few large dark rooms which had escaped being walled and subdivided out of the recognition of their old proportions, gave the Yard a character. It was inhabited by poor people, who set up their rest among its faded glories, as Arabs of the desert pitch their tents among the fallen stones of the Pyramids; but there was a family sentimental feeling prevalent in the Yard, that it had a character.
As if the aspiring city had become puffed up in the very ground on which it stood, the ground had so risen about Bleeding Heart Yard that you got into it down a flight of steps which formed no part of the original approach, and got out of it by a low gateway into a maze of shabby streets, which went about and about, tortuously ascending to the level again. At this end of the Yard and over the gateway, was the factory of Daniel Doyce, often heavily beating like a bleeding heart of iron, with the clink of metal upon metal.
The opinion of the Yard was divided respecting the derivation of its name. The more practical of its inmates abided by the tradition of a murder; the gentler and more imaginative inhabitants, including the whole of the tender sex, were loyal to the legend of a young lady of former times closely imprisoned in her chamber by a cruel father for remaining true to her own true love, and refusing to marry the suitor he chose for her. The legend related how that the young lady used to be seen up at her window behind the bars, murmuring a love-lorn song of which the burden was, ‘Bleeding Heart, Bleeding Heart, bleeding away,’ until she died.
© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean
The Bleeding Heart Yard of today is more sedate than its fictional past but there are still reminders of the legends of the past.
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