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Exhibition Review- Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet at the Royal Academy from 30 June to 29 September 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy of Arts presents a survey of paintings and prints by the Swiss artist Félix Vallotton (1865–1925). This will be the first exhibition of the artist’s work in the UK since 1976. Although the artist is admired in his native Switzerland, Vallotton remains relatively little known elsewhere.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition features around 100 works from public and private collections across Europe and the U.S and includes representations from every period of the artist’s career.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The first section of the exhibition presents a number of Vallotton’s work from the 1880s, following his arrival in Paris at the age of sixteen. Although he was influenced by contemporary movements such as Impressionism, the artist followed more closely artists of the Northern and Dutch traditions with works like his earliest known self-portrait, Self-portrait at the Age of Twenty, 1885 and the painting The Sick Girl, 1892.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Vallotton at this time had yet to find his own particular artistic style, however in the early 1890s he formed ties with the Nabis, a group of avant-garde artists including Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard. It was around this time that Vallotton began to experiment with print making especially Japanese woodblock printing. These type of illustrations were very popular in newspapers and magazines and Vallotton made a steady income from magazine illustrations, he became the principal illustrator for the influential journal La Revue blanche.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Many of his prints were satirical, the series Intimités, 1897–98 and paintings of interior scenes, 1898–99, such as The Visit, 1899  exposes some of hypocrisies of the Parisian bourgeoisie.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

When La Revue blanche closed, Vallotton entered into marriage with a wealthy widow Gabrielle Rodrigues-Henriques in 1899 and concentrated on painting. His work from this time often featured psychological dramas in domestic interiors, the artist plays with perspective and lighting to create idea that behind the familiar lurks all kinds of dark secrets.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This theme is carried on from around 1904  when the female nude became Vallotton’s principal subject. This section of the exhibition presents works such as Nude Holding her Gown, 1904 and Models Resting, 1905. The nudes seem consumed by shame and unwilling to play the game of being alluring, this style was very different from other painters of the period.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Often the nudes are in pairs and look to be in conversation whilst in the background mirrors and reflections offer a dark background to the light foreground.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A section focuses on paintings and prints produced during the First World War, the artist’s initial enthusiasm for the war was changed by a visit to the trenches and his portfolio This is War!, 1916 features splattered red ink on the cover, while the six images, in black and white, capture the danger and terror of the ordinary soldier fighting at the front.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The exhibition concludes with a selection of Vallotton’s landscapes and still-life paintings. The landscapes like Sandbanks on the Loire, 1923 have a surreal quality with limited colour and simple compositions.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover the often original and innovative work of Felix Vallotton, this often overlooked artist provides a very different perspective of Paris at the turn of the 20th century. Vallotton indicates with his work that it is a city that underneath its bonhomie harbours dark secrets. This psychological interplay plays a major part in Vallotton’s later works especially his nudes series. It is possible that the artist’s painting and prints were a little too close to the mark for the wealthy patrons from the Parisian bourgeoisie which exposed many of their less pleasing qualities. This may be part of the reason, why his work was not highly valued at the time and why it is only in recent years that his originality and innovation have been more widely recognised.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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The Golden Boy of Pye Corner in London

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Golden Boy of Pye Corner is a famous small monument located on the corner of Giltspur Street and Cock Lane near the City of London. The Golden Boy marks the spot where the 1666 Great Fire of London was stopped. The statue is made of wood and is covered with gold. The building that incorporates it is a Grade II listed building.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

It bears the following small inscription below it:

This Boy is in Memmory Put up for the late FIRE of LONDON Occasion’d by the Sin of Gluttony.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The main inscription, 10 ft below the boy is The boy at Pye Corner was erected to commemorate
the staying of the great fire which beginning at Pudding Lane was ascribed to the Sin of Gluttony
when not attributed to the papists as on the Monument and the Boy was made prodigiously fat to
enforce the moral he was originally built into the front of a public-house Called The Fortune of War
Which used to occupy this site and was pulled down in 1910.

‘The Fortune of War’ was The chief house of call North of the River for Resurrectionists in body
snatching days years ago. The landlord used to show the room where on benches round the walls the bodies
Were placed labelled with the snatchers’ names waiting till the Surgeons at Saint Bartholomew’s could run
round and appraise them.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The area was known as Rennerstrete in the 15th century, famous London historian Stow considered that the name “Pie Corner” from the sign of the Pie, “a fayre Inn for recipte of travellers, but now divided into tenementes “.

Pie Corner in the 17th century was often mentioned for its food, Ben Jonson writes in the Alchemist in 1612 remarks

“I shall put you in mind, sir, at Pie Corner,
Taking your meal of steam in from cooks’ stalls.”

In the 18th century, Strype mentions Pie Corner, as “noted chiefly for cooks’ shops and pigs dressed there during Bartholomew Fair.”

As noted in the information on the wall, The Fortune of War public house was known for resurrectionists who often displayed their corpses to surgeons at nearby St Bartholomew’s Hospital. The public house was mentioned in William Thackeray’s Vanity Fair and Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities before being demolished in 1910.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Despite the knowledge of the area, the origins of the Golden Boy is shrouded in mystery and little is known when he appeared on the wall on Pie Corner. Many have mentioned that although the Golden Boy is associated with gluttony, he is not really a fat little boy. In fact he resembles a cherub but where he came from is not known.These mysteries are quite common in London where the origins of these objects are often lost in time.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Messengers by Bridget Riley at the National Gallery

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Since January 2019, a new large-scale wall painting by the British abstract artist Bridget Riley has been on display at the National Gallery. The painting spans 10 x 20 metres and consists of a combination of coloured discs painted directly onto the surface of the Gallery’s Annenberg Court.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The title of the work, Messengers, is inspired by a phrase of the landscape painter, John Constable, referring to clouds in the sky.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Bridget Riley is considered one of the most important artists of her generation and has long associations with the National Gallery. Riley studied at Goldsmiths’ College from 1949 to 1952, and at the Royal College of Art from 1952 to 1955. In the 1960s she developed a style called ‘Op-art’ which explored different aspects of optical phenomena in paintings.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

She has had solo exhibitions all around the world and represented Britain at the Venice Biennale in 1968. The National Gallery staged her exhibition Bridget Riley: Paintings and Related Work in 2010.

For more information, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Display Review – Leonardo’s Legacy: Francesco Melzi and the Leonardeschi at the National Gallery from 23 May to 23 June 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The National Gallery marks the 500th anniversary of Leonardo da Vinci’s death with a display presenting the exceptional loan of the recently restored Flora (about 1520) by Francesco Melzi from the State Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The painting is being displayed alongside ten other key works by the so-called ‘Leonardeschi’ from the National Gallery. The term ‘Leonardeschi’ has been used to identify artists centred in Milan who were taught by or associated with Leonardo, or whose work bears his influence.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Francesco Melzi (1493–1570) was the favoured assistant and companion to Leonardo in his final years and was largely responsible for preserving Leonardo’s notebooks and drawings for posterity. The highlight of the display is a stunning painting by Melzi depicting Flora, the goddess of springtime and flowers.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

For many years it was assumed that the painting of ‘Flora’ was by Leonardo himself because of the female characteristics and the fine attention to detail in the depiction of the plants. The painting is symbolic in a number of ways with Flora’s exposed breast and how she inspects a sprig of aquilegia known as a symbol of fertility. On her lap she holds a spray of jasmine, signifying purity, beside anemones representing rebirth.

Few works by Melzi are known: only two works signed by him have survived (both in Milan), although he is known for his chalk portrait of Leonardo in the Royal Collection Trust.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The display features works by Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio (about 1467–1516), Marco d’Oggiono (active from 1487–died 1524), Giampietrino (active about 1500–1550), Bernardino Luini (about 1480–1532), and Martino Piazza (active about 1513–1522), among others. Many these paintings show key elements of Leonardo’s work without the touch of the master, one particular Leonardo trait picked up by his follows was ‘sfumato’ in which true outlines of opaque bodies are never seen with sharp precision.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Martino Piazza’s Saint John the Baptist in the Desert (1513-22), Follower of Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio’s Narcissus Probably about 1500, Marco d’Oggiono’s Portrait of a Man aged 20 (1494) and Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio’s The Virgin and Child probably about (1493-9) illustrate how some of his followers absorbed different characteristics of their master’s art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This small free fascinating display provides evidence that Leonardo da Vinci did not always work in isolation but had a number of followers who were willing to learn from the master. Melzi in particular played an important part in Leonardo’s latter life and deserves to be more recognised for his painting talents as well as earning plenty of gratitude for saving Leonardo’s notebooks and drawings.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review: BP Portrait Award 2019 at the National Portrait Gallery from 13 June to 20 October 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The BP Portrait Award, now in its 40th year at the National Portrait Gallery and 30th year of sponsorship by BP, is a highly successful annual art event aimed at encouraging artists to tackle the theme of painted portraiture within their work. The BP Portrait Award, one of the world’s most prestigious art competitions, has a first prize of £35,000, making it one of the largest for any global arts competition.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The BP Portrait Award is popular with artists with 2,538 entrants  from 84 countries, it is also popular with the public, last year the BP Portrait Award exhibition received over 300,000 visitors.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The entries were narrowed down to the final 44 works selected for the BP Portrait Award 2019 exhibition, the winners were selected from the portraits chosen for the exhibition.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The prestigious first prize was won by Brighton based artist, Charlie Schaffer for Imara in her Winter Coat, a portrait of his close friend. The artist’s prize is £35,000 and a commission, at the National Portrait Gallery Trustees’ discretion, worth £7,000 (agreed between the National Portrait Gallery and the artist).

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The second prize of £12,000 went to Norwegian painter, Carl-Martin Sandvold, for The Crown, a self-portrait in existential thought.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The third prize of £10,000 went to Italian artist, Massimiliano Pironti, for Quo Vadis?, a portrait of his maternal grandmother, Vincenza, a former miller and factory worker now aged ninety-five.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The BP Young Artist Award of £9,000 for the work of a selected entrant aged between 18 and 30 has been won by 30 year-old Brighton based artist Emma Hopkins for Sophie and Carla, a portrait that depicts the photographer Sophie Mayanne and her pet dog.

The winner of the BP Travel Award 2018, Robert Seidel’s portraits from along the Danube is displayed alongside the BP Portrait Award 2019 exhibition.

Frank Bowling – Tedi Lena © 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Part of the attraction of this free exhibition is to enjoy the wide variety of portraiture which features some famous and not so famous faces. The standard is consistently high and it is fun when you wander around the exhibition to pick out your own particular favourites and decide whether you agree with the judge’s choices.

Self Portrait by Sheng Chieh Chou- © 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The BP Portrait Award 2019 exhibition will run at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 13 June to 20th October 2019. Admission is free.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the National Portrait Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Exhibition Review – Bartolomé Bermejo: Master of the Spanish Renaissance at the National Gallery from 12 June to 29 September 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The National Gallery presents a select number of works by Bartolomé Bermejo (about 1440–about 1501), the artist was considered one of Spain’s most innovative and accomplished painters in the second half of the 15th century.

Bartolomé de Cárdenas was more commonly known as ‘Bermejo’ was born in Cordoba but was active in the Crown of Aragon, working in Tous, Valencia, Daroca, Zaragoza, and Barcelona. Very little is known about his life but it seems likely that he was a converso (a Jew converted to Christianity) which may expain his nomadic lifestyle where he often partnered with local artists to access painters’ guilds and obtain religious commissions.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This small free exhibition includes six loans that have never been seen outside of Spain, including two of Bermejo’s masterpieces: Triptych of the Virgin of Montserrat (probably 1470–75), painted for the Italian cloth merchant Francesco della Chiesa, from the Cattedrale Nostra Signora Assunta in Acqui Terme, Alessandria (Italy), and the recently restored ‘Desplà Pietà’ (1490), named after the man who commissioned the work – Lluís Desplà, archdeacon of Barcelona Cathedral, where the painting has been since the 15th century.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

In addition, four panels depicting scenes from Christ the Redeemer (Descent of Christ into Limbo and Resurrection from Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya (MNAC), Barcelona; Christ entering Paradise and Ascension from the Fundació Institut Amatller d’Art Hispànic, Barcelona, all about 1470–5) are displayed.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

At the centre of the exhibition is the National Gallery’s own painting by Bermejo, Saint Michael Triumphant over the Devil with the Donor Antoni Joan (1468) which is considered one of the most important early Spanish painting in Britain, it is displayed here for the first time following its recent conservation. Painted in 1468, the Saint Michael Triumphant is thought to have once formed part of an altarpiece dedicated to Saint Michael in the church of the same name in Tous, near Valencia. It is the first of some twenty known works by Bermejo, produced over a career spanning just over thirty years.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The first surviving document relating to the artist, in the form of a receipt for partial payment for the Saint Michael Triumphant, is displayed alongside the painting for the very first time in this exhibition.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The painting shows an elegant archangel Michael covered in a embroidered, jewel-encrusted cape defeating the devil who depicted in the form of a grotesque being. Antoni Joan, lord of Tous and the donor who commissioned the work, kneels at the archangel’s feet and looks up from his prayer book to witness Saint Michael’s victory over the devil.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The works on display demonstrate Bermejo’s considerable technical talent that was considered superior to his Spanish contemporaries. Such was his expertise, it was thought that the artist may have been trained in the Netherlands or had closely studied Dutch paintings of the period.

This fascinating exhibition is the latest of a series of exhibitions at the National Gallery where a certain artist or picture are showcased which allows the viewers to really understand some of the stories behind the artist or picture. The work of Bartolomé Bermejo is not widely known but the exhibition provides some insights into early Spanish painting and highlights the work of an artist who life and work still remains a mystery.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we attract thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Summer Events at Severndroog Castle – 2019

For something a little different, take a trip to Severndroog Castle for a series of events over the summer. You can enjoy Live Vintage Jazz, have a Night at the Opera or enjoy an entertaining night at the theatre production of Nell Gwynn.

Severndroog is a tower built in the 18th century situated in the Oxleas Woods in the Royal Borough of Greenwich. Built on Shooters Hill, one of the highest points in the city, the viewing platform boasts some of the most spectacular views in London.

Live Vintage Jazz with Jess DeGiudici

Friday 21st June 2019 at 18:30-22:00 GMT

Ticket Prices: Courtyard Ticket £6.50 + booking fee, Premium Ticket £13 + booking fee.

Book tickets on Eventbrite here

Minimum age: 14 Years

Parking: Free parking facilities available at The Castle Wood Car Park, which will remain open for the duration of
this event.

A Night of Opera with ‘Memories – From The Life of An Opera Singer’
featuring Baroness Tamara von Stein zu Leitershofen (Soprano) and Richard Black on piano.

Event Details:
Friday 12th July 2019 at 18:30-22:00 GMT

Ticket Prices: Courtyard Ticket £6.50 + booking fee, Premium Ticket £13 + booking fee.

Book tickets on Eventbrite: here

Minimum age: 14 Years

Parking: Free parking facilities available at The Castle Wood Car Park, which will remain open for the duration of
this event.

Changeling Theatre’s production of ‘Nell Gwynn’ by Jessica Swale.

Event Details:

Thursday 18th July 2019 at 19:30 GMT

Ticket Prices: £25

Book tickets : here

Minimum age: 14 Years

Parking: Free parking facilities available at The Castle Wood Car Park, which will remain open for the duration of
this event.

Severndroog’s catering partner Terrace Tearoom, and their celebrated chef Christopher Hackett, will be cooking up delicious bites and cocktails, with wine and beer available all evening.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

London Statues: Fearless Girl in Paternoster Square

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Fearless Girl by Kristen Visbal was made famous for being sited in 2017 near the Wall Street’s bull in New York. The statue was a hit with tourists and the internet.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A copy of the statue of was installed in March in the City of London’s financial district to highlight the importance of female leaders in business.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Situated near St Paul’s, Fearless Girl seems a little lonely with only Elizabeth Frink’s sheep statue for company.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The statue is expected to remain in Paternoster Square until the end of June.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Natalia Goncharova at Tate Modern from 6 June to 8 September 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Tate Modern presents the UK’s first ever retrospective of the Russian avant-garde artist Natalia Goncharova. It features a survey of an artist who is largely unknown but was considered a pioneering and radical figure and celebrated during her lifetime as a leading modernist artist. The exhibition features over 160 international loans which are rarely outside of Russia , including from Russia’s State Tretyakov Gallery which houses the largest collection of Goncharova works in the world.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Goncharova was born in 1881 and grew up on her family’s country estate  in the Tula Province, this period was important for the artist because despite her being an aristocrat’s daughter,  she was exposed to the traditional customs and cultures of her native Central Russia which provided inspiration throughout  her artistic career.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The second room charts Goncharova’s move from the provinces to Moscow when she was eleven, whilst in Moscow she decided to pursue an artistic career and was greatly influenced by the works of Cezanne, Gauguin and Picasso. At the age of 20 she enrolled at the School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture where she met fellow artist Mikhail Larionov. In the room, Picasso’s Queen Isabeau 1909, is displayed near Goncharova’s Peasants Picking Apples 1911 and Orchard in Autumn 1909.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Goncharova  gradually found herself as a leader of the Moscow avant-garde and was prolific in her output, the third room plays tribute to  Goncharova’s remarkable 1913 retrospective that was held at the Mikhailova Art Salon in Moscow, which originally featured some 800 works. The room includes work from the 1913 exhibition and covers the full range of the artist’s work from folk art, work about the countryside like the monumental seven-part work The Harvest 1911 to more modernist works like her paintings of nudes.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The success of the 1913 show led to Goncharova being in demand in a number of ways,  room four is dedicated to her work in fashion design and her collaborations with Nadezhda Lamanova, couturier of the Imperial court.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Although Goncharova and Larionov arrived in Paris in 1914 at the invitation of Sergei Diaghilev, to work on costume and set designs for the Ballets Russes, the start of the First World War led to the couple returning to Moscow. The exhibition features her series of lithographs entitled Mystical Images of War that illustrate the bravery and futility of the conflict.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

A section devoted to Goncharova’s religious painting include the Evangelists 1911, a four-panel work which had delighted London in 1912 but shocked Russia’s capital of St Petersburg in 1914, Christ the Saviour 1910-11 and Mother of God 1911.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Like many artists at the start of the 20th century, Goncharova was attracted to futurism and produced a number of works that dealt with technology and machines. The exhibition reunites Linen from Tate’s own collection with Loom + Woman (The Weaver) from the National Museum of Wales and The Forest from the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, all created in the same studio in 1913 and on display together for the first time since then.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Goncharova and her partner left Moscow to tour with Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1915 in Europe, the political turmoil leading to October Revolution of 1917 meant it was not advisable to go back to Russia and they set up home in Paris. After her success with Ballets Russes , Goncharova was in demand with commissions for fashion, costume and interior design, she also exhibited her work in Europe and the United States. The exhibition features a decorative screen Spring 1928, commissioned by the Arts Club of Chicago and Bathers 1922, a monumental triptych displayed in the UK for the first time.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The final room in  the exhibition is dedicated to her collaborations with the Ballets Russes, the work for which she was best known from 1914 to the 1950s. It presents the artist’s most groundbreaking work for the theatre, including costume designs for Le Coq d’or (The Golden Cockerel) and Les Noces (The Wedding), both performed on London stages in the 1920s and 30s, as well as examples of actual costumes used in historic ballet productions.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition introduces the work of Natalia Goncharova to a wider audience, the artist like her contemporary Kazimir Malevich tried to combine the traditions of Russian culture with the modern world. Her prolific output in a variety of media is testament to her talent to work in a number of styles to gain commercial success.  Unfortunately Goncharova like many Russian artists suffered after the 1917 Revolution, the images of peasants was not required by the new Russian state and the people outside of Russia began to view the new state as a threat.  It is only after the collapse of the Soviet Bloc that artists like Goncharova are being reassessed and recognised as pioneering and radical figures.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Exhibition Review: Summer Exhibition 2019 at the Royal Academy from 10 June to 12 August 2019

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Royal Academy Summer Exhibition is one of the great English Art traditions, it is the world’s oldest open-submission exhibition being established in 1768 whose long line of exhibitors reads like a Who’s Who of British Art. Some of the earliest exhibitors included the likes of Reynolds, Constable and Turner, however the exhibition prides itself that it offers a snapshot of contemporary art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This year, the Royal Academy celebrates its 251st Summer Exhibition and acclaimed British painter, Jock McFadyen has been awarded the role of co-ordinator. McFadyen with the Summer Exhibition Committee have tried to create a show that builds a unique platform for artists at all stages of their career to present recent work.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The artwork begins before you enter the building  with artist Thomas Houseago  showing  a group of large-scale sculptural works in the Royal Academy’s Annenberg Courtyard next to Academy’s statue of Joshua Reynolds, which has stood in the courtyard since 1931.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Visitors enter the exhibition through the Central Hall which features a ‘menagerie’ of animals of all shapes and sizes including Polar Bear by Shira Zelwer, D.F.W.T.W 2 by Ron Arad and Easy Tiger – Mach Brothers by David Mach.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Against the wall is Keep Ou by Banksy, this features a custom arch salvaged from Heathrow airport with a small painting at the bottom.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Spencer de Grey RA curates the Architecture Gallery, which explores the theme of sustainability. Many notable architects have summitted models and prints including Lord Foster, Arup, Lord Rogers and Sir Nicholas Grimshaw.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Part of the fun is walking around the exhibition and spotting work by established artists, work that particularly caught my eye were Lily and Quaye by Ishbel Myerscough, We are all Immigrant Scum by Jeremy Deller and A Kind of Blue by Allen Jones.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Other artists exhibiting in this year’s Summer Exhibition include Tracey Emin , Gary Hume , David Nash , Wolfgang Tillmans and Anselm Kiefer. The celebrated German filmmaker and photographer Wim Wenders has taken over the free McAulay Gallery, with a series of panoramic photographs.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

Each room offers a kaleidoscope of colour and images in a range of media, from painting, printmaking, film and photography to sculpture, architectural works and performance art.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Summer Exhibition offers a platform for emerging and established artists and architects to showcase their work in front of a large international audience. The Summer Exhibition also plays a practical role in training young artists, it raises funds to finance the current students of the RA Schools. The RA Schools is the longest established art school in the UK and offers the only free three-year postgraduate programme in Europe.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

The Summer Exhibition is the world’s largest open submission contemporary art show which has taken place every year without interruption since 1769. Works from all over the world are judged on merit and the final selection is made during the eight-day hang in the galleries. This year the Royal Academy received over 16,000 entries with around 1200 works going on display.

© 2019 Visiting London Guide.com – Photograph by Alan Kean

This fascinating exhibition has a large number of wonderfully eclectic works on display, there is really something for everyone regardless of your particular artistic taste. The Summer Exhibition is one of the highlights of the art world’s summer and attracts a wide range of visitors. It also offers a rare opportunity to buy works from well-known and not so well-known artists with prices ranging from a few hundred to over a hundred thousand pounds.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

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