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Monthly Archives: October 2018

Exhibition Review – Klimt / Schiele: Drawings from the Albertina Museum, Vienna at the Royal Academy from 4th November 2018 to 3rd February 2019


The Royal Academy marks the centenary of the deaths of two of the pioneering figures of early twentieth-century art, Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele both died in 1918. The Klimt / Schiele: Drawings from the Albertina Museum, Vienna exhibition is one of the first in the UK to focus on the importance of drawing for both artists.

The exhibition comprises of around 100 unique works on paper by Klimt and Schiele, including studies for allegorical paintings, portraits and self-portraits, landscapes, erotic nudes and a sketchbook, as well as carefully selected examples of lithographs, photographs and original publications. These rarely loaned works are drawn from the holdings of the Albertina’s world-renowned collection, and, following the exhibition at the Royal Academy and due to their sensitivity to light, they will not be displayed again for many years to come.

Klimt made his name painting the interiors of state buildings in Austria, Germany and Switzerland and the Burgtheater in Vienna. Despite his work being respected by the Viennese art establishment, in 1897 he became the founding president of a radical group of young artists called the Secession, who broke away from the state-sponsored Academy to exhibit art independently.  Klimt was able to develop a more unconventional and modern artistic approach that  raised his profile internationally.

Schiele was twenty-eight years younger than Klimt and had shown prodigious talent in his youth, he was advised by his  teachers  to enter the Akademie der Bildenden Künste (Academy of Fine Arts), where he enrolled aged 16 in 1906. At the turn of the twentieth century, both found themselves at different points in their careers, photographs in the exhibition show Klimt looking every inch the artist, whilst Schiele in his portrait shows his belligerent attitude.

The exhibition is arranged thematically in five sections examining Klimt’s and Schiele’s processes in drawing and how their particular styles were developed over time.

Klimt’s drawings usually relate to his painted work  therefore following traditional preparatory processes, Schiele used drawing as an end to itself and was interested in the expressive and graphic nature of the subject.

Although Klimt had influenced Schiele for many years, the drawings show that Schiele also influenced Klimt that create often very similar styles. In the early years of the twentieth century, it was the temperament of the two artists  that led to divergence in styles. Klimt became Vienna’s most sought after portrait painter with regular commissions from the Viennese fashionable society whereas  Schiele’s bohemian lifestyle was shocking the wider Viennese society.

Schiele began to live with his model, Wally Neuzil and in 1912 was arrested on charges of child abduction. The more serious charges were dropped but Schiele was jailed for a 24 days on the charge of public immorality.  Schiele’s drawings were made to shock the often conservative Viennese society and he succeeded but realised that to make a career as an artist he would need to compromise and he returned to Vienna and gained some new patrons.

Eventually, Schiele was widely acknowledged to be Klimt’s successor and his drawings reflected his new status. However the First World War interrupted this progress, although in 1916, both Klimt and Schiele participated in a exhibition in Berlin.

Schiele was stationed as a military clerk where he produced drawings of Russian captives in a prisoner of war camp and some landscape and nature drawings. At this time, Schiele was featured in a special issue of Die Aktion, a Berlin avant-garde magazine.

At the beginning of 1918, Klimt was the most respected artist in Vienna and Schiele was making a name for himself both in Vienna and internationally. Tragically by the end of 1918, both artists were dead, Klimt died from pneumonia and Schiele succumbed to the flu epidemic.

This fascinating exhibition illustrates the way that the artistic careers of Klimt and Schiele were interwoven especially at the beginning at the 20th century. Both tried to rebel against the conservative elements of Viennese society, however Klimt managed to push the boundaries whilst appealing to the avant-garde  collectors. Klimt’s influence on Schiele is evident in the young artist’s early drawings. From 1910, Schiele began to create his own expressive style which both shocked and fascinated the art world. Unfortunately the death of Schiele prevented the opportunity to see how his work would have developed, leaving a body of work that is often incoherent and disturbing.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended   

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

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Exhibition Review – The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution at the Science Museum from 21 September 2018 to 24 March 2019

This year marks 100 years since the murder of the Romanov family, the last rulers of Russia and the Science Museum presents a free exhibition entitled The Last Tsar: Blood and Revolution. The exhibition investigates the role of science in the lives of Tsar Nicholas II and his family and how advances in forensic science helped to solve one of the greatest mysteries of the 20th century.

The first part of the exhibition explores the lives of the imperial family through a number of rare artefacts, including the family’s personal diaries, private possessions and two Imperial Fabergé Easter Eggs presented by the Tsar to his wife just a year before the fall of the imperial house.

An insight into the personal lives of Nicholas II and his family to life is gained by looking through the photographic albums created by an English tutor to the Tsar’s nephews which is displayed for the first time. They offer a unique glimpse into the daily lives and routines of the Romanov family.

The exhibition explores the treatment of Tsar Nicholas II only son and heir, Alexei’s life-threatening haemophilia B, a rare blood condition and infamous ‘royal disease’ was passed down from Queen Victoria.

One of the highlights of the exhibition is the medicine chest that traveled with the family which contained hundreds of different treatments.

The Romanov family’s decision to keep Alexei’s illness a secret had serious consequences because although the imperial family showed some reliance on the latest medical discoveries, it was the use of traditional and spiritual healers especially Rasputin that contributed to the fall of the 300-year-old dynasty.

The second part of the exhibition examines the investigation into the disappearance of Tsar Nicholas II, his family and entourage following the revolutions of 1917 and the events of 1918.

Visitors will be able to examine evidence from the scene of the execution – from the dentures of the imperial physician, a single diamond earring belonging to the Tsarina, to a chandelier from the house where the family were executed and look at the evidence about the events that led to the deaths of the family.

The exhibition shows how for the first time, forensic DNA analysis was used to solve a historic case using blood samples from relatives (including HRH Prince Phillip) and how advances in DNA profiling and 3D reconstruction were used to positively identify the remains of the imperial family and enabled the family to be finally laid to rest in a ceremony in St Petersburg. Dr Peter Gill from the Forensic Science Service in the UK played a leading part identifying the remains of the last Tsar, Tsarina, and three of their five children.

This fascinating exhibition provides some real insights into one of the greatest mysteries of the 20th century. For decades it was thought that the remains of the murdered Romanov family had been cremated, however a number of often unofficial investigations came up with a number of alternative theories. It was the advance of forensic DNA analysis and British expertise that was able to prove that certain remains found were indeed those of members of the family.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Science Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review – The Sun: Living With Our Star at the Science Museum from 6 October 2018 to 6 May 2019

The Science Museum presents an exhibition entitled The Sun: Living With Our Star which explores our relationship with our closest star.This will be one of the first exhibitions that explores the Sun’s profound influence on the way we have lived in the past, live in the present and how we may live the future.

The exhibition begins by looking at how many ancient civilizations worshipped and studied the movements of the sun creating stories and myths about how the Sun was transported across the sky. Some early Nordic Bronze Age artefacts in the exhibition illustrate how people made sense of our most important natural phenomenon.

Next we have a series of clocks and sundials used to measure time, one highlight is the original orrery, a mechanical model of the Solar System, made for the Earl of Orrery in 1712 to demonstrate the motions of the Earth and Moon around the Sun. Another highlight is the astronomical spectroscope made for Norman Lockyer who used it to identify the element helium in the Sun’s atmosphere in 1868.

Since the invention of the telescope in the early 1600s, people have undertaken research to unlock some of the secrets of the Sun. The exhibition includes detailed sketches, prints, paintings and photographs of the Sun which reveal the important observations recorded by artists and astronomers between the mid-1800s and mid-1900s.

These include the sunspot paintings of James Nasmyth and photographs by Elizabeth Beckley.

Since the 20th century, there has been a realisation of the heath benefits of the sun with a section of the exhibition given over to a small beach and posters relating the healthy seaside air, however there is also a film that charts the rise of skin cancer in some parts of the world caused by too much exposure to the Sun.

There has also been a movement to harness the power of the sun to provide a safe and sustainable energy source. Solar panels are shown with films showing their widespread use in all parts of the world.

Visitors to the exhibition can look at the ways that scientists have used to recreate the nuclear reactions that power the Sun here on Earth. In the exhibition is the Tokamak ST25-HTS, a prototype nuclear fusion reactor which successfully created plasma for a record-breaking 29 hours in 2015.

This fascinating exhibition charts how humankind has gained understanding about our nearest star from Bronze Age artefacts to the latest details of upcoming NASA and ESA solar missions. To tell the story, the exhibition brings together animations, archive recordings and film with a unique collection of scientific instruments, technological innovations and historic artefacts. There are a number of interactive experiences designed for visitors to understand and explore the power of the Sun.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information and tickets, visit the Science Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Champions Tennis at the Royal Albert Hall – 6th to 9th December 2018

The ever popular Champions Tennis returns to The Royal Albert Hall on the 6th – 9th December, with legends of the game including John McEnroe, Tim Henman, Jamie Murray and Tommy Haas set to take centre court in the iconic setting.

Champions Tennis is a four-day tournament which includes world-class tennis from the legends of the game, although competitive the tournment is also a lots of fun for all the family.

This year, the tournament includes John McEnroe, Mark Philippoussis, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Carlos Moya, Mansour Bahrami, Tim Henman, Tommy Haas, Xavier Malisse, Henri Leconte, Mikael Pernfors, Thomas Enqvist, Goran Ivanisevic and Jamie Murray.

The tournament, now in its 22nd year, is comprised of an afternoon and an evening session per day –
with two scheduled matches per session; one competitive singles match and one doubles match.

For more information and tickets, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 : A Space Odyssey IMAX screenings at the Science Museum – November 2018

Photo – Warner Bros

To celebrate its 50th Anniversary, The Science Museum will be presenting a series of IMAX 15/70mm screenings of Stanley Kubrick’s science fiction masterpiece “2001: A Space Odyssey,”.  This will be the first time that the 70mm IMAX print of Kubrick’s groundbreaking 1968 epic is being screened in the UK.

Photo – Warner Bros

Widely considered to be one of the greatest films of the 20th century, “2001: A Space Odyssey” redefined the Science Fiction genre with its revolutionary special effects and intelligent screenplay which Kubrick co-wrote with legendary science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke.

Photo – Warner Bros

The film was originally released in the 70mm Cinerama roadshow format in 1968 and starred Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood. In keeping with the original 1968 release, all IMAX screenings will feature a brief interval. Visitors are also welcome and indeed encouraged to come to any screening in 1960s dress.

Photo – Warner Bros

The Science Museum engagement comes on the heels of the widely successful “unrestored” 70mm film release of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” which was overseen by acclaimed filmmaker Christopher Nolan, a lifelong admirer of Kubrick and who’s Dunkirk was recently screened at the Science Museum.

To get filmgoers in the mood for the film, they can visit the Science Museum’s Exploring Space Gallery which is home to a large and rich collection of space objects and memorabilia including rockets, satellites, probes and landers.

“2001: A Space Odyssey” runs at the Science Museum IMAX at varying dates and times from Thursday 1 November 2018.

Dates:

Thursday 1 Nov – 19.00
Saturday 3 Nov – 14.30 and 19.00
Wednesday 7th Nov 19.00
Saturday 10 Nov – 14.30 and 19.00
Wednesday 21 Nov – 19.00
Saturday 24 Nov – 14.30 and 19.00

Rating: The film is rated U but please note all under 12s must be accompanied by an adult

Running Time: The film is 2h 29 mins long plus interval

Costs: £14-£7, concs available

For more information and tickets, visit the Science Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Exhibition Review : Edward Burne-Jones at Tate Britain from 24 October 2018 to 24 February 2019

Tate Britain presents the largest Edward Burne-Jones retrospective to be held in the UK for a generation. Edward Burne-Jones is best known for his ties to the Pre-Raphaelites and his symbolist works of myths and legends. The exhibition brings together over 150 works in different media including painting, stained glass and tapestry and includes work created working for William Morris. Burne-Jones was born in Birmingham and whilst at Oxford became friends with William Morris who were both influenced by Gabriel Rossetti. Burne-Jones had intended to enter the church but was persuaded by Rossetti to become an artist.

The exhibition begins by looking at Burne-Jones relationship with Rossetti, its was the artist-poet who encouraged him and found him support from fellow artists and patrons. Works here include two stain glass windows related to Chaucer’s ‘Goode Wimmin’, The Wine of Circe and The Lament.

Rossetti was very impressed by Burne-Jones draughtsmanship and the second room entitled ‘Burne-Jones as a Draughtsman’ includes many of his drawings including Desiderium.

From 1877, Burne-Jones began to exhibit his paintings at the new Grosvenor Gallery that was seen as an alternative to the Royal Academy, some of his most popular pictures were Love among the Ruins, The Wheel of Fortune and The Golden Stairs.

Room four features a number of portraits, a number of familiar faces appear in these portraits including his wife Georgina and his daughter Margaret. Other portraits include paintings of Amy Gaskell and Lady Windsor.

From 1875, Burne-Jones worked on a number of paintings as part of a narrative cycle concerning myths and legends, the exhibition includes the Perseus Series and the Briar Rose series.

The Briar Rose series based on the Sleeping Beauty fairy tale were especially popular with critics and general public.

The final room looks at ‘Burne-Jones as Designer’ and his influence on decorative arts at the end of the 19th century. Burne-Jones worked in a number of different media including painting, stained glass, tapestry, embroidery, furniture and book illustration. His work for Morris and Co was highly valued especially his many designs for stained glass windows. In this room is the remarkable Graham Piano 1879-80, embroideries, illustrated books and spectacular large-scale tapestries like The Arming and Departure of the Knights of the Round Table on the Quest for the Holy Grail 1890-1894 and Adoration of the Magi 1894.

This fascinating exhibition explores the work and legacy of an artist who is often associated with the Pre-Raphaelites and Symbolist movements. The exhibition suggests that Burne-Jones is one of the most influential British artists of the 19th century and walking around the exhibition it would be difficult to suggest that this is not the case. However his pursuit of ‘beauty’ in art was often at odds with the social realism movements at the turn of the twentieth century. Without doubt, his draughtsmanship was widely admired by many and unlike many of his contemporaries, he did achieve world-wide fame and recognition in his life-time. Edward Burne-Jones works did touch a chord with sections of Victorian society who loved the escapism of his enchanted worlds inhabited by beautiful and melancholy beings. For much of the 20th century, his work has been overlooked, this exhibition is a reminder of the range and scope of his work and highlights his distinct and original approach to painting and decorative arts.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Britain website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
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Exhibition Review – New Acquisitions: Gozzoli to Kara Walker at the British Museum from 4 October 2018 to 27 January 2019

The British Museum presents a new exhibition which displays some of the most important prints and drawings the Museum has acquired over the past 5 years.

These include rare artworks from its collection by some of the world’s most famous artists, including David Hockney, Bridget Riley, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Jeremy Deller, Raphael, Edgar Degas and Phyllida Barlow.

In the exhibition is around 150 artworks which are a selection from the 3000 graphic works that the British Museum has added into its prints and drawings collection since 2013. These works highlights spans six centuries with the oldest work on show is by the Renaissance master Benozzo Gozzoli from around 1460, and the newest is Kara Walker’s 2017 monumental print Resurrection Story with Patrons, which depicts a giant statue of a black woman being erected.

Highlights of the exhibition are the British Museum’s first ever drawing by Andy Warhol, which depicts a study of a theatre set he designed in New York in 1959.

The exhibition will also show the Museum’s first ever work by Phyllida Barlow, which is a study for one of the sculptures in her British pavilion installation at the 2017 Venice Biennale.

Visitors will also be able to see five prints from one of Pablo Picasso’s greatest-ever graphic works. Suite 347 is a series of 347 etchings made in 1968 which show the remakable invention and ingenuity of the octogenarian artist.

The British Museum is the only UK museum to have a complete set, they are seen alongside a Picasso linocut and aquatint.

Many of the works, including those by Bridget Riley and Georg Baselitz, have been donated by the artists themselves or their families and estates,

This fascinating free exhibition provides an eclectic mixture of old and new classics which will delight visitors before the works are stored away or used for later exhibitions.

Visiting London Guide Rating –  Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here