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Monthly Archives: August 2018

Christian Marclay: The Clock at Tate Modern – 14th September 2018 to 20th January 2019

Christian Marclay’s internationally celebrated 24-hour video installation The Clock will go on display at Tate Modern for the first time from 14 September 2018 to 20 January 2019. The public will be invited to experience the work for free during gallery opening hours, as well as at additional 24-hour screenings.

Captivating audiences across the world since its debut in 2010, The Clock is a thrilling and poignant montage of thousands of film and television clips that depict clocks or reference time. Following several years of rigorous and painstaking research and production, Marclay edited these excerpts to create an immersive visual and sonic experience. This landmark work operates as a gripping journey through cinematic history as well as a functioning timepiece. The installation is synchronised to local time wherever it is on display, transforming artificial ‘cinematic time’ into a sensation of real time inside the gallery.

Combining clips spanning 100 years of well-known and obscure films, including thrillers, westerns and science fiction, audiences watching The Clock experience a vast range of narratives, settings and moods within the space of a few minutes, allowing time to unravel in countless directions at once.

Christian Marclay is recognised as one of the foremost contemporary artists working in sound and image. He received the prestigious Golden Lion Award at the Venice Biennale in 2011 when The Clock was shown. Tate jointly acquired this celebrated video work in 2012 together with the Centre Pompidou, Paris and The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. After touring internationally, this will be the first time Tate has shown The Clock since it joined the Tate collection. The work will be displayed in Tate Modern’s Blavatnik Building which since opening in 2016 has created flexible exhibition space to show large immersive video installations.

For more information, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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RA Festival of Ideas at the Royal Academy – 7th to 16th September 2018

In September 2018, The Royal Academy of Arts hosts the inaugural RA Festival of Ideas (7 – 16 September 2018), a 10- day celebration of creativity, culture and critical thinking. The new 250-seat double-height Benjamin West Lecture Theatre, part of the Royal Academy’s transformed campus, will play host to a meeting of great minds from across the spheres of art, architecture, film, theatre, literature, design, dance and music. Building on the RA’s heritage of rigorous debate, the festival will explore creative practice and current cultural, social and political issues through a series of interviews, conversations and panel discussions, as well as offering a range of family workshops inspired by the programme in the new Clore Learning Centre.

Friday 7 September

Artist Gilbert & George RA will discuss how their collaborative partnership defines their creative process, with the Royal Academy’s Artistic Director Tim Marlow. (7pm)

Saturday 8 September

Prize winning authors and illustrators Stephen Collins and Isabel Greenberg discuss The Art of the Graphic Novel, chaired by journalist and founder of the Observer graphic novel prize Rachel Cooke. (1.30pm)

 Artist and drum ‘n’ bass pioneer Goldie will talk about the relationship between his music and visual art, in conversation with broadcaster and journalist Nihal Arthanayake. (3.30pm)

In The Future Of Museums and Galleries in the 20th Century, three leading figures in the art world, Director of the V&A Tristram Hunt, Tate Modern Director Frances Morris and Director of Museums and Cultural Programmes at UCL Tonya Nelson, discuss the state of the gallery and museum industry today, chaired by broadcaster John Wilson. (5.30pm)

 Artist and designer Es Devlin, known for creating kinetic stage sculptures for theatre, opera, music concerts and museums, as well as in collaboration with Beyoncé, U2 and Adele, will discuss her practice and process across multiple, diverse artistic disciplines. In conversation with design critic and author Alice Rawsthorn. (7.30pm)

Sunday 9 September

Playwright James Graham and Artistic Director of the Almeida Theatre Rupert Goold come together to talk about making theatre that is inspired by real and recent events and their shared ambition to make theatre more accessible. Chaired by journalist Sarah Crompton. (1pm)

Class, Culture and Creativity with Asif Kapadia, Dreda Say Mitchell and Bob and Roberta Smith RA invites three artists from the worlds of film, literature and visual art to debate how class has shaped and influenced their creative output; whether it has helped or hindered them and what needs to change. The talk is chaired by the writer and broadcaster Nihal Arthanayake. (3pm)

Renowned British portrait photographer David Bailey joins the Royal Academy’s Artistic Director Tim Marlow to discuss a career that spans over 60 years. (5pm)

Monday 10 September

Cultural historian and lecturer, television producer and author Franny Moyle will discuss the challenges of writing about the lives of well-known artists from Turner to Holbein. (1pm)

Turner Prize nominee Yinka Shonibare RA discusses how race, class and cultural identity have shaped his work, with critic and author Louisa Buck. (7pm)

Tuesday 11 September

 In Art and Dementia, Thriller writer Nicci Gerrard talks to academic Dr Hannah Zeilig about the transformative power of art, and how crucial the arts and creativity can be in keeping a person connected to the world around them. (1pm)

 Historian David Cannadine delivers a lecture on ‘the statesman as artist’, taking a closer look at Winston Churchill’s talents as a painter. The lecture will be followed by a Q&A chaired by Secretary and Chief Executive of the Royal Academy, Charles Saumarez Smith. (7pm)

Thursday 13 September

World-renowned architect Amanda Levete will consider some of her most pioneering projects – from the Museum of Art, Architecture & Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon, to the Exhibition Road Quarter at the V&A in London – and the importance of risk in architecture. The talk will be followed by a Q&A with writer and broadcaster Tom Dyckhoff. (7pm)

 Friday 14 September

Twenty-five years after the publication of Birdsong, and in the month when his latest novel Paris Echo is published, best-selling author Sebastian Faulks examines how the shadow of war has shaped his work. In conversation with journalist and broadcaster Suzi Feay. (1pm)

Photographer Don McCullin talks to broadcaster and journalist Alex Clark about how his experiences of war photography have shaped his landscapes and still-lifes. (4pm)

 Musician, filmmaker and author Viv Albertine and artist Sue Webster discuss how not conforming has shaped and influenced their professional and personal lives – both creatively and spiritually. Their conversation will be chaired by broadcaster and journalist Miranda Sawyer. (6pm)

 Tamara Rojo, Artistic Director and Lead Principal dancer of English National Ballet, on her career as one of the most prominent dancers of her generation, and her ambition to reinvigorate traditional ballet through her role at the English National Ballet, in conversation with broadcaster John Wilson. (8pm)

 Saturday 15 September

The Man Booker Prize winning novelist Howard Jacobson and award-winning Sunday Times art critic and broadcaster Waldemar Januszczak will examine Marcel Duchamp’s contested legacy, debating whether conceptual art is A Joke That Went Too Far or the Birth of Modern Art. (1.30pm)

In The Young Adult Novel, three leading authors, Malorie Blackman, Melvin Burgess and Juno Dawson, question how to tackle difficult issues such as drugs, sex and racism, and discuss whether there are any topics that are off limits in the young adult genre. The discussion is chaired by writer, journalist and broadcaster Nicolette Jones. (3.30pm)

Booker Prize-winning novelist and poet Ben Okri speaks to broadcaster and journalist Alex Clark about his artistic collaboration with Rosemarie Clunie on The Magic Lamp: Dreams of Our Age – a collection of 25 paintings and 25 short stories. 5.30pm)

Akram Khan, one of the most respected dance artists working in the UK today, talks to journalist Sarah Crompton about his lifelong passion for dance, the power of storytelling and the joys and challenges of creative collaboration. (7.30pm)

Sunday 16 September

Founder of Heatherwick Studio, Thomas Heatherwick RA will talk about several of the studio’s projects including Coal Drops Yard, a new retail quarter in King’s Cross due to open in October 2018. The lecture will be followed by a conversation with RA Head of Architecture Kate Goodwin. (2.30pm)

War Horse author Michael Morpurgo talks to journalist and critic Claire Armitstead about the importance of creativity, why we must never talk down to children and why it is important for them to read about war. (12.30pm)

Artists Question Time with Sonia Boyce RA, Michael Craig Martin RA, Michael Landy RA, Farshid Moussavi RA and Sean Steadman sees a panel of artists field questions from the audience on issues of art, culture and creativity. The panel will be chaired by the Artistic Director of the Royal Academy, Tim Marlow. (4.30pm)

Family Events

Saturday 8 September

50 years after the publication of The Tiger Who Came to Tea, best-selling author and illustrator Judith Kerr talks to broadcaster and author Francine Stock about her life, work and escape from Nazi Germany. (11.30am)

Interactive Storytelling with Lauren Grierson, celebrates 50 years of The Tiger Who Came to Tea. Families will be invited to help recreate Sophie’s extraordinary tea time with music, props and movement. (11.15am, 12pm, 1.15pm, 2pm)

Sunday 9 September

Children’s author Andy Stanton talks about his multi-award-winning ‘Mr Gum’ series, as well as his new book, Natboff! One Million Years of Stupidity (10.30am)

 Animal Life Drawing with Wild Life Drawing will take an interactive look at the creatures that inspire some of our most beloved children books. Specialist animal handlers will be on hand to provide an introduction to the animals and share fun facts on different species and where to find them. (10am and 1pm)

Saturday 15 September

Lauren Child, Charlie and Lola author, illustrator and Waterstones Children’s Laureate, will look at the inspirations behind her work, the magic of reading and writing for children and how ideas can come from anywhere. In conversation with writer, journalist and author Nicolette Jones. (11am)

Gemma Burditt leads a Lauren Child Inspired Animation Workshop taking inspiration from much loved characters from Charlie and Lola or Ruby Redfort, helping guests design and create their own moving picture. (10am and 1.30pm)

Sunday 16 September

Interactive Storytelling with Wendy Shearer invites guests to weave a story around the character of Anansi the Spider, one of the most important characters of West African and Caribbean folklore, whose stories have been handed down for generations. (10am, 11.15am, 2pm)  Cressida Cowell, best-selling author of children’s book series, How to Train Your Dragon and The Wizards of Once, gives tips on becoming an author or illustrator and does some live drawing. (10.30am)

For more information and tickets, visit the Royal Academy website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Eat17 opens a new store in Hammersmith as part of its plans to expand in the capital

With all the doom and gloom about the death of the high street, it may be time for the high street to reinvent itself and multi-award winning fine food store and restaurant chain Eat17 may be a model that will attract a lot of interest.

Eat17 combines elements of a convenience store with a dining scene and has recently opened its new store in Hammersmith as part of its plans to expand in the capital.

The new store is situated on Smiths Square Market on Fulham Palace Road and it is the fifth addition to the Eat17 chain, which has stores already in Walthamstow, Hackney, Whitstable and Bishop’s Stortford.

The Hammersmith store offers a unique interactive shopping experience that reinvents the market hall – offering the finest food and drink, 100 refillable food lines, an indoor street food market and yoga classes in store.

Eat17’s own brand ranges such as Bacon Jam and fresh bakery items share aisles with everyday SPAR essentials and local concession ranges. There is also self-serve coffee, wine and beer growlers as well as signature coffee in the bar area and soft serve ice cream.

 The dining area consists of three street food booths serving up fresh dishes from local food concessions including The Pizza Project, Knowing Meat knowing You and Bun Kabab of Empress Market Pakistani Kitchen.

 The booths are surrounded by beautiful plants and feature lighting and there is a seating area opposite. There is also a 2,000-square foot mezzanine room where yoga classes will take place.

All Eat17 stores are different but fall under the general ethos of the brand which is to provide quality local and convenience food alongside a dining option for a unique consumer  experience. It provides this by stocking the best food staples from Spar alongside Eat17 own brand ranges, offerings from in-house butchers and bakers and products from local concessions who trade in store.

These stores tend to appeal to the modern consumer who are happy to be faced with an eclectic mix of products and services under one roof.  With its reputation for innovation, Eat17 may be a name to watch in London in the next few years.

For more information, visit the Eat17 website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Magic Realism: Art in Weimar Germany 1919-33 at Tate Modern – 30th July 2018 to 14th July 2019

This summer, Tate Modern is exploring the art of the Weimar Republic (1919-33) in a year-long, free display, drawing upon the rich holdings of The George Economou Collection. This presentation of around seventy paintings and works on paper addresses the complex paradoxes of the Weimar era, in which liberalisation and anti-militarism flourished in tandem with political and economic uncertainty. These loans offer a rare opportunity to view a range of artworks not ordinarily on public display – some of which have never been seen in the United Kingdom before – and to see a selection of key Tate works returned to the context in which they were originally created and exhibited nearly one hundred years ago.

Although the term ‘magic realism’ is today commonly associated with the literature of Latin America, it was inherited from the artist and critic Franz Roh who invented it in 1925 to describe a shift from the anxious and emotional art of the expressionist era, towards the cold veracity and unsettling imagery of this inter-war period. In the context of growing political extremism, this new realism reflected a more liberal society as well as inner worlds of emotion and magic.

The profound social and political disarray after the First World War and the collapse of the Empire largely brought about this stylistic shift. Berlin in particular attracted a reputation for moral depravity and decadence in the context of the economic collapse. The reconfiguration of urban life was an important aspect of the Weimar moment. Alongside exploring how artists responded to social spaces and the studio, entertainment sites like the cabaret and the circus are highlighted, including a display of Otto Dix’s enigmatic Zirkus (‘Circus’) print portfolio. Artists recognised the power in representing these realms of public fantasy and places where outsiders were welcomed.

Works by Otto Dix, George Grosz and Max Beckmann perhaps best known today for their unsettling depictions of Weimar life, are presented alongside the works of under recognised artists such as Albert Birkle, Jeanne Mammen and Rudolf Schlichter, and many others whose careers were curtailed by the end of the Weimar period due to the rise of Nationalist Socialism and its agenda to promote art that celebrated its political ideologies.

The full list of artists in the display includes: Max Beckmann, Richard Biringer, Albert Birkle, Heinrich Campendonk, Marc Chagall, Lovis Corinth, Heinrich Maria Davringhausen, Harry Heinrich Deierling, Rudolf Dischinger, Otto Dix, Josef Eberz, Conrad Felixmüller, Otto Griebel, Carl Grossberg, George Grosz, Hans Grundig, Lea Grundig, Herbert Gurschner, August Heimüller, Karl Otto Hy, Alexander Kanoldt, Paul Klee, Jeanne Mammen, Josef Mangold, Carlo Mense, Richard Müller, Sergius Pauser, Christian Schad, Otto Rudolf Schatz, Rudolf Schlichter, Werner Schramm, Prosper de Troyer, Marie-Louise von Motesiczky and Nicolai Wassilieff.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic exhibition at the Florence Nightingale Museum – 21st September 2018 until 16th June 2019

1918 flu in Oakland – credit Wikimedia Creative Commons

This September, the Florence Nightingale Museum will present a special exhibition that explores the devastating impact of the Spanish flu pandemic 100 years ago, and the role of both professional nurses in military field hospitals and ordinary women at home, in caring for victims.

Influenza – credit Wikimedia Creative Commons

Although overshadowed by the events of the First World War, the Spanish flu outbreak was a deadly influenza pandemic which struck in the autumn of 1918, just as World War I was drawing to a close. It is estimated that Spanish flu infected half a billion people worldwide and killed 50-100 million, significantly more than the war itself.

The pandemic was unusual because healthy young adults seemed to be particularly at risk and it created gruesome symptoms, including explosive nosebleeds and distinctive blue tinged skin caused by a lack of oxygen as their lungs filled with fluid and pus.

Demonstration at Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station in Washington DC – credit Wikimedia Creative Commons

With resources stretched already by the war, the scale of the pandemic was so vast, that essential public services broke down across the globe, hospitals were overwhelmed with patients, and a shortage of both coffins and gravediggers meant that the bodies of victims could remain unburied for weeks.

Influenza – credit Wikimedia Creative Commons

Against this background, the exhibition explores the often neglected role of the professional nurses and ordinary women who cared for the victims.

It was Florence Nightingale’s pioneering nursing work during the Crimean War that revolutionised the way nurses were viewed within society. With the outbreak of World War I, thousands of women were inspired to follow in her footsteps and volunteer as nurses. It was these women that would be vital in the treatment of casualties in the war and the victims of the Spanish flu in 1918.

 Berkeley, California. Open air Barber Shop during influenza epidemic – credit Wikimedia Creative Commons

The ‘Spanish Flu’ exhibition has been developed to six key themes through a variety of interpretation, interactives, films and object displays. These themes are:

The global impact and spread of the pandemic

What it was like to have Spanish flu and the unusual treatments and remedies used in a desperate attempt to combat the virus  

The impact of Spanish flu on everyday life

The experiences of both volunteer and professional nurses during the pandemic 

Spanish flu in popular culture and famous victims

The contemporary relevance of the 1918 pandemic

The exhibition will be supported by a diverse events programme, a free downloadable resource pack for schools, and a ‘pop up’ touring exhibition which will enable audiences beyond London to see core and digital content.

Spanish Flu: Nursing during history’s deadliest pandemic exhibition at the Florence Nightingale Museum – 21st September 2018 until 16th June 2019

Florence Nightingale Museum, 2 Lambeth Palace Road, Lambeth, London SE1 7EW

For more information, visit the Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

The Royal Opera House Opening Up Events – September and October 2018

Ahead of the completion of the Royal Opera House’s three year ‘Open Up’ renovation project, the famous venue has announced a new events programme. The new additions Ballet Dots, Opera Dots, Books at Brunch and Crafternoons will lift the lid on the artistry of the Royal Opera House and enable everyone – young and old – to find something new.

These newly designed programmes will run alongside free Live at Lunch drop in performances, Recitals at Lunch, Dance with The Royal Ballet and Come and Sing at The Royal Opera House.

For the first time, Ballet Dots and Opera Dots (£10 for one child and £5 for a subsequent child) will help children under five discover ballet and opera through sensory dance, singing, music and stories.

Books at Brunch (£12 pp) will feature talks from authors, broadcasters, publishers and artists from across the worlds of opera and ballet to encourage literary discussions within the intimate confines of the Linbury Theatre Foyer. Crafternoons (£12 pp) will allow audiences to try their hand at some of the techniques used to bring the ballet and opera performances to life, working with talented craftspeople from the Royal Opera House.  Crafternoons will be ticketed drop-in sessions from 2 – 5pm and Books at Brunch will run for one hour, from 10.30 – 11.30am, both on selected dates. Fifty per cent of tickets for these programmes are available to students, with the rest on sale to general public.

Budding singers of all ages and ability will be able to join in and sing with an opera chorus during the Come and Sing at The Royal Opera House (£10 pp) sessions. Keen dancers can learn dance steps inspired by the ballets performed at the Royal Opera House, led by a member of The Royal Ballet Company during the Dance with the Royal Ballet (£10 pp) workshops.

The Live at Lunch events are free, drop-in performances featuring artists from The Royal Opera and The Royal Ballet as well as guest artists in the relaxed environment of the newly opened-up foyer. These will be inspired by the heritage and repertoire of The Royal Opera and The Royal Ballet, featuring new and commissioned works.

Recitals at Lunch (£10 or £12 pp) will feature a ticketed programme of music in the Royal Opera House Crush Room, featuring artists from The Royal Opera, Orchestra of The Royal Opera House, Jette Parker Young Artists and a range of guest artists. 

 All programmes will take place at the Royal Opera House, which will be open to everyone, every day from 10am. The new bars, cafés, restaurants and displays will make the Royal Opera House an attractive daytime destination.

For more information , visit the Royal Opera House website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

CRW Nevinson: Prints of War and Peace at the British Museum – 24th July to 13th September 2018

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) Column on the March© the Trustees of the British Museum.

The British Museum presents CRW Nevinson: Prints of War and Peace, a new display celebrating a selection of works documenting Nevinson’s experiences during the First World War. This free show commemorates the centenary of Nevinson’s substantial gift of 25 of his prints to the British Museum in 1918, with a number of works on display for the first time.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) Self portrait © the Trustees of the British Museum

Christopher Richard Wayne Nevinson  attended the Slade School of Art from 1909 – 1912. It was a golden generation of artists that were studying there at the time – among his fellow students were: Stanley Spencer, Mark Gertler, Paul Nash and Dora Carrington. On display is a remarkable self-portrait Nevinson executed while a student at the Slade. This striking work echoes the Old Masters drawings that the school’s formidable tutor, Henry Tonks, encouraged his students to examine at the British Museum. This will be presented alongside a visitor book from the British Museum’s Print Room with both Nevinson and Gertler’s signatures in, and both artists were often found working there during these years.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946)
The Road from Arras to Bapaume, 1918 © the Trustees of the British Museum

It was the new and exciting style of the Futurists that captured Nevinson’s imagination. Once Nevinson experienced for himself the ugly reality of war when he volunteered as an ambulance driver (November 1914 – January 1915) he saw the slaughter that the first mechanised war could deliver.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) A Dawn, 1914, 1916 © the Trustees of the British Museum

On display are works such as A Dawn, 1914 and Column on the March, which both show massed ranks of French soldiers, devoid of any individuality, tightly packed together marching to their doom as future cannon fodder.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) The Doctor, 1916 © the Trustees of the British Museum

Shocked and disgusted by the conditions that the wounded soldiers had to endure, Nevinson vividly conveyed the desolation and horror he encountered in prints such as The Doctor and Twilight.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) Looking down into Wall Street © the Trustees of the British Museum.

This focussed display also includes dynamic urban cityscapes that Nevinson created after the war. From the skyscrapers in Looking down into Wall Street and Looking through Brooklyn Bridge, New York. The atmosphere of the crowd is superbly rendered in the large lithograph Wet Evening, Oxford Street and Nevinson’s favourite city, Paris, is affectionately captured in From a Paris Window, 1922 and Place Blanche, 1922.

Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (1889-1946) Looking through Brooklyn Bridge, New York© the Trustees of the British Museum.

As critical acclaim for Nevinson’s prints reached its height in the late 1920s, he had to give up printmaking for health reasons and died in 1946. As his painting became more conventional, Nevinson’s reputation suffered and today he is an almost forgotten artist. The stark black and white images of the First World War presented in powerful display showcase Nevinson as a one of the finest modernist printmakers of his generation.

For more information, visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here