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Monthly Archives: March 2018

Exhibition Review : Joan Jonas at Tate Modern – 14th March to 5th August 2018

Tate Modern presents an exhibition by American artist Joan Jonas who is best known for her work in performance art. The exhibition is part of a wider exploration of the artist’s work which will also include a  ten-day live performance programme in the Tanks which will feature live performances by Jonas herself, and a film retrospective in the Starr Cinema.

The exhibition at Tate Modern is spread over two levels and charts Jonas’s artistic career from her early work in the New York’s downtown arts scene to her more recent works.

Jonas was inspired by other culture’s rituals and performances and began to incorporate filmed performance pieces into her work. Jonas started using masks after going to Japan and seeing Noh theatre, animal masks in particular are a constant theme of her work over five decades. The exhibition includes a section of the artist’s masks and props.

The pieces in the Tanks entitled Reanimation illustrate Jonas’s interest in light and reflection.

Mirror Piece which will be performed in live performance was one of the artist’s early performance pieces and plays with idea that mirrors can be mysterious and can create tension from viewers whose reflections become part of the performance.

The Lines in the Sand and Juniper Tree provide evidence of the way the artist often brings disparate media together to create an installation. The Juniper Tree 1976/1994, uses 29 wooden balls, a ladder, a kimono to retell a Brothers Grimm fairytale. Lines in the Sand 2002, reworks the myth of Helen of Troy to reference contemporary political events.

Various video pieces entitled My New Theatres are placed in a large wooden box with a bench at the end which creates a different kind of space to watch the film. This idea of distorting the viewing experience is repeated in a number of installations like Stream or River, Flight or Pattern 2016-2017. 

This unusual and entertaining  exhibition pays tribute to one of the pioneers of performance art. Whilst Jonas follows some of the traditional art of storytelling, in other ways she likes to distort the narrative with music, images and masks. This exhibition and the series of events at Tate Modern will introduce Jonas to a wider audience and will give visitors an opportunity to understand why she is considered a pioneer of performance, video and installation who has influenced generations of younger artists. 

Video Review available here 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Recommended 

For more information or book tickets , visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Book Review – Walk through History: Victorian London by Christopher Winn (Ebury Press)

Anyone who has trampled through the streets of London will know of the endless fascination of the capital. However the sheer scale can often be overwhelming and we often take the remarkable variety of buildings, monuments and open spaces for granted. One particular period, many people ignore because it is so commonplace is the Victorian era.

Fortunately, this book Walk through History : Victorian London seeks to rectify this oversight by taking readers on a series of original walks through different areas of central London whilst focusing on one particular period of history, the Victorian.

The author is Christopher Winn, bestselling author of I Never Knew That About London and a self-confessed trivia collector for over 20 years.  He makes the point that much of London is Victorian and many of the organisations and institutions that we take for granted originated in this period. Over the course of Queen Victoria’s reign form 1837 to 1901, London’s population grew sevenfold and the capital became the centre of a British empire where the sun never set. To befit this new status, architects and engineers transformed London with churches, schools, hospitals, financial institutions, theatres, residential buildings, bridges, sewers, roads and railways.

Many of the iconic buildings and structures from this period are well-known like the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge, St Pancras station , the Royal Albert Hall and the London Underground. However, the author states that “Victorian London is all around us. And yet much of it goes unappreciated, hidden from view by familiarity and everyday life.”

The book provides a guide to appreciating some of London’s Victorian delights with a series of seven walks in different areas of the city. The seven chapters include Walking in Victorian South Kensington, Walking in Victorian Kensington, Walking in the Victorian City, Walking in the Victorian East End, Walking in Victorian Holborn, St Pancras & Bloomsbury, Walking in the Victorian West End and Walking in Victorian Mayfair, St James’s, Victoria, Whitehall & Westminster.

A map at the beginning of each chapter provides a visual look at the route with a series of small sections providing more detail of places of interest. Most of the walks start and finish near an underground station and there are a number of recommended places for refreshments.

In many ways, the format is similar to many books, however it is the book’s design, breadth of knowledge and writing style that sets this book apart from its competitors. The author takes the reader on a walk through Victorian London with a sense of history and wonder, describing the Coalbrookdale Gates, one of the last surviving structures of the Great Exhibition, he suggests that it is “spine tingling to think that they are a product of the workshop that triggered the Industrial Revolution.”

The author is excited by the “fantastical world” of George and Peto’s Collingham Gardens, London’s “finest Victorian lavatories” at the Wesley Chapel, the “rather wonderful, if somewhat forbidding” King’s Cross Police Station, James Smith & Sons is considered “London’s best preserved high-class Victorian shop.”

These are just a few of the many buildings and structures that attract the author’s attention as the reader is taken around Victorian London. If you are unfamiliar with the architects, engineers and philanthropists of Victorian London, more information is given at the end of the book.

This fascinating and attractive book reminds us that Victorian London is often the foundation of the modern city. The design and structure of the book is delightfully old-fashioned with wonderful illustrations by Mai Osawa. In many ways, this book is similar to the Alfred Wainwright guides to the Lake District, both share an idiosyncratic style that is permeated with their affection for their subject matter.

If you are a London obsessive or a visitor who would like to find out more about Victorian London whilst enjoying walking the urban landscapes of the capital, this book will be an invaluable companion.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information, visit the Penguin website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Bat Out of Hell at the Dominion Theatre – 2 April 2018 to 28 July 2018

Winner of Best Musical at the Evening Standard Theatre Awards 2017 and nominated for 8 WhatsOnStage awards in 2018, Jim Steinman’s smash-hit musical Bat Out of Hell returns to London at the Dominion Theatre after a successful 2017 run in London.

Originally written as a musical, Bat out of Hell featuring Meatloaf went on to become one of the most successful albums of all time.

The story centres around young, rebellious leader Strat who falls in love with Raven, the beautiful daughter of the most powerful man in post-apocalyptic Obsidian.

Important information

Age restriction

 5+

Running time

2hr 45min (including interval)

Performance dates

2 Apr 2018 – 28 Jul 2018

Content

Due to mild swearing and scenes of partial nudity, the show is not recommended for children under the age of 12.

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Booking website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

London Symphony Orchestra 2018/19 season at the Barbican

The London Symphony Orchestra and its Music Director Sir Simon Rattle open their 2018/19 season at the Barbican with a programme affirming a continuing commitment to British music new and old on 16 Sep 2018 in the Barbican Hall. The concert features a world premiere by Sir Harrison Birtwistle, a defining figure in British music since the 1950s, Mark-Anthony Turnage’s 1995 work Dispelling the Fears, Holst’s masterpiece Egdon Heath, and Britten’s Spring Symphony. It is the first concert in an ambitious 51-concert season which runs to the end of Jun 2019 and explores in a broad defining concept the roots, origins and the future of music.

Simon Rattle conducts 16 concerts which explore the impact that different cultural traditions have had on music, from Eastern European folk music, through the British folk traditions in Grainger and Vaughan Williams, and on to the extraordinary impact of jazz. Gianandrea Noseda explores Russian identity in music, whilst continuing his cycle of Shostakovich’s symphonies, and conducts a Strauss programme featuring the soprano Diana Damrau in the final act of his last opera Capriccio.

François-Xavier Roth looks at the extraordinary spread of music traditions from Europe at the turn of the 20th Century, and in one concert, three composers from the central European tradition who were each in the vanguard of modern music in their time, Haydn, Bartók and Ligeti. Roth also heads up the third edition of LSO Futures, the Orchestra’s new music festival which is centred around the young composers taking part in the LSO’s new music development programmes, and also features David Lang’s Public Domain, written for 1000 community voices and performed in the Barbican foyers.

Michael Tilson Thomas, and Sir Mark Elder each explore American identity with music by the maverick Charles Ives, and Sir John Eliot Gardiner continues his Schumann retrospective with his completely fresh take on Romanticism. Verdi and Puccini are brought together with Ponchielli when Sir Antonio Pappano conducts non-operatic works by these three operatic giants and Barbara Hannigan is conductor and soprano in a programme featuring Berg’s Lulu Suite and music from Gershwin’s musical Girl Crazy alongside works by Haydn and Ligeti. Hannigan is also the soloist in Hans Abrahamsen’s Let me tell you, which is conducted by Simon Rattle in Jan 2019.

The 15th Donatella Flick Conducting Competition will take place in Nov 2018 when conductors aged 30 and under compete for a cash prize and the position of Assistant Conductor with the LSO. The Competition’s final round, featuring violinist Vadim Repim, will be live-streamed from the Barbican for the first time on Medici.tv and YouTube. Bernard Haitink celebrates his 90th birthday conducting the LSO in Mahler and Bruckner in Dec 2018 and the LSO’s concerts marking the Leonard Bernstein Centenary come to a close in Dec, when Marin Alsop conducts two performances of Bernstein’s Candide, on the same stage where Bernstein himself conducted the work in 1989 with the LSO. The LSO’s Half Six Fix series which presents short, early-evening concerts will continue with four concerts this season, and there is a wealth of activity at LSO St Luke’s, the Orchestra’s music education and community centre.

The season ends in Jun 2019, with the return of the artistic partnership of Simon Rattle and the director Peter Sellars with two staged performances of Janáček’s opera The Cunning Little Vixen.

For more information , visit the Barbican website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
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Southbank Centre 2018/19 Classical Music Season

Southbank Centre have announced their  2018/19 Classical Music Season, The Southbank has four Resident Orchestras, the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, London Sinfonietta and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, and four Associate Orchestras, Aurora Orchestra, BBC Concert Orchestra, Chineke! Orchestra and the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain.

Philip Glass Photo Raymond Meier

The season will be a fascinating mix of contemporary composers, new work, and musical pioneers. The 2018/19 season sees the largest number of new works and premieres seen at the Southbank Centre in a decade, with the newly-reopened Queen Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room, alongside the Royal Festival Hall. 39 new commissions and premieres set the tone for a season that also features initiatives such as the Composers’ Collective, the inaugural new music festival New Music International, the first UK performance of Stockhausen’s Donnerstag aus Licht since its 1985 UK premiere  and the European premiere of a new symphony commissioned from Philip Glass, based on the music of David Bowie.

Andris Nelsons – Photo: Marco Borggreve

World-class artists and ensembles will the three venues the  including the Gewandhausorchester Leipzig under new Kapellmeister Andris Nelsons, Mitsuko Uchida and the Mahler Chamber Orchestra, Leonidas Kavakos, Jordi Savall, Yuja Wang, Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Sarah Connolly, Julia Fischer and Håkan Hardenberger. 

Highlights of the season include:

European premiere of Philip Glass’ 12th symphony for organ and orchestra, based on the music of David Bowie and performed by James McVinnie with London Contemporary Orchestra alongside Glass’ two previous Bowie symphonies

A focus on the music of Karlheinz Stockhausen, including the first UK performance of Donnerstag aus Licht since its UK premiere at the Royal Opera House in 1985, and a weekend of concerts and events curated by Artist in Residence Pierre-Laurent Aimard.

Launch of New Music International in January 2019, a new music festival with a global outlook, featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Du Yun, a portrait of composer Rebecca Saunders, MacArthur Fellow and flautist Claire Chase, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, London Sinfonietta and Aurora Orchestra

The inaugural year of Composers’ Collective, a new initiative giving composers at all stages of their career access to pioneering composers featured throughout Southbank Centre’s season including Esa-Pekka Salonen, Unsuk Chin, Gerald Barry, Charlotte Bray, Bryce Dessner, and more

The centenary of Dame Muriel Spark’s birth is celebrated by the Nash Ensemble and mezzo-soprano Sarah Connolly with the world premiere of a new work by David Matthews

PRS Foundation’s free music festival New Music Biennial returns in July 2019, with 20 new pieces spanning classical, folk, jazz, electronic, opera and sound art.

For more information , visit the Southbank Centre website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

 

Exhibition Review : Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy at the Tate Modern from 8th March to 9th September 2018

Tate Modern presents an exhibition entitled Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy which is a unique opportunity to view some of Picasso’s important works created in just one year. This is the first ever solo Pablo Picasso exhibition at Tate Modern and features more than 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings. The exhibition takes visitors on a month-by-month journey through 1932 to explore some of the reasons why it was so pivotal in Picasso’s life and work.

Picasso had turned fifty in late 1931 and had become one of the most famous living artists in the world. However, many critics believed his best years were behind him and Picasso was increasingly restless with his work and his personal relationships. He bought an 18th century mansion in Normandy where he experimented with sculpture and began to consider a new range of works. In late 1931, Picasso completed a small painting called Woman with Dagger which portrayed a woman killing her sexual rival. The strained marital relationship with his wife and his secret affair with Marie-Thérèse Walter would be one of the themes that dominated his work in 1932. 

In February 1932, one of Picasso’s paintings was sold for 56,000 francs in Paris and the artist had started an ambitious range of portraits which included a female figure reading, sleeping and listening to music. A number of these paintings in the exhibition like Reading 1932, The Dream 1932 and Woman in Red Armchair illustrate that Picasso was experimenting with his style which often veered between surreal and abstract.

The next room shows some of the sculptures that Picasso began to produce at Boisgeloup, his Chateau in Normandy.

The Early March room features three works featuring the artist’s lover Marie-Thérèse Walter which have not been shown together since 1932, Made over the course of only five days Nude, Green Leaves and Bust, Nude in a Black Armchair and The Mirror are part of a burst of creative energy with a new sense of colour and sensuality.

The Late March to May sees Picasso revert back to Surrealism with an Octopus motif influenced by French filmmaker Jean Painleve.

The room entitled Fame reflects some of the work that was on display at his exhibition at the Galeries Georges Petit in June 1932. In contrast to the work, he was producing at that time, the exhibition was mainly a retrospective of his early work where his portraits of his wife and son featured prominently.

The July and August room illustrates that Picasso returned back to the style that he was developing before the retrospective with Reclining Nudes and Nude Woman in a Red Armchair.

After the riot of colour in the exhibition, the Black on White room provides a different appeal with a series of drawings and sketches. The September and October room includes a series of drawings based on the Crucifixion that Picasso completed after he had visited Zurich for his first major museum exhibition.

The work in the final room entitled November and December indicated that the early optimism of the year had changed into something darker with a series of paintings about water, drowning and rescue. These are likely to be in response to the concern for  Marie-Thérèse who became seriously ill after swimming in the river Marne.

This fascinating exhibition provides an opportunity to explore the work of Picasso from just one year, 1932. This was not just an ordinary year for the artist, in many ways it can be seen as a mid-life crisis in both his artistic and personal life. Picasso’s response was to throw himself into his work and he produced a remarkable range of work that is often considered some of his best. In many ways it was a year in which he developed a style that defined his work for many years afterwards.  

Video Review available here 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or book tickets , visit the Tate Modern website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Caught by the River Social Club – March and April 2018

The latest intimate, one-off monthly events created by the Caught by the River website take place in the Horse Hospital in Bloomsbury and Little Portland St.

The Social is a place to enjoy songs, music, poetry and films inspired by the wildlife and landscapes of the British Isles. Caught by the River is the gathering place for those that treasure wildlife, nature, interesting characters and tremendous music.

Tuesday 13 March – Caught by the River at the Horse Hospital

A one-off night of music and film, featuring:

Dead Flows the Don: A magical odyssey up-river by broadcaster, writer, film-maker and songwriter, David Bramwell. Mixing moving image, music and storytelling, David journeys up Yorkshire’s river Don to uncover its occult secrets, battling his own thalassophobia (fear of what lurks beneath), learns about hydromancy from magician Alan Moore, discovers a forest of figs and encounters Jarvis Cocker on his own adventures, sailing down the Don on an inflatable inner tube. David won a Sony Award (with producer Sara-Jane Hall) for BBC Radio 3’s The Haunted Moustache, makes The Canal and River Trust and The Odditorium podcasts, has written books – including The No. 9 Bus to Utopia and The Haunted Moustache – and released six albums with the band Oddfellow’s Casino.

Jim Ghedi: Living in the Moss Valley – the abandoned and forgotten area on the edgelands of South Yorkshire and North East Derbyshire – it makes perfect sense that Jim Ghedi’s music feels both fluidly transient yet deeply rooted. Jim’s just-released second LP, A Hymn for Ancient Land (Basin Rock) is described as “landscape music, a close relative of landscape art” and combines 6 and 12-string finger-style guitar, orchestral arrangements and traditional folk song.

DJ on the night will be Stephen Cracknell (the Memory Band); MC will be John Andrews.

Built in 1797 and tucked away in an unspoilt mews in the heart of Bloomsbury, the Horse Hospital is London’s only existing unspoilt two-floor, purpose-built stable open to the public.

EVENT INFORMATION

Full details: caughtbytheriver.net

Date: Tuesday 13 March 2018, 7pm.

Venue: The Horse Hospital, Colonnade, Bloomsbury, London WC1N 1JD

Tickets: £8 in advance 

Monday 9 April – Caught by the River presents…The Glass Aisle & Lomond Campbell

Singer-songwriter, Brian Briggs, (former frontman of Stornoway) and award-winning Welsh poet, Paul Henry, perform tracks from their new album ‘The Glass Aisle’, a mesmerising collaboration of songs and poetry set on the Monmouthshire-Brecon canal. Paul’s lyrics transport the listener deep into the frozen landscape on the cusp of spring, via Brian’s pure tenor, and into the company of poacher-fisherman John Moonlight and Marconi, who conducted his experiments for radio on the canal. ‘The Glass Aisle’ is also the title of Paul’s new poetry collection, published by Seren.

Paul and Brian will be supported by Lomond Campbell. A long-time resident of Edinburgh, eager to flee the clamour and turbulence of the city, Campbell upped sticks a couple of years ago, setting up home and studio in a decrepit, asbestos-ridden school house in the shadow of Ben Nevis. His debut record ‘Black River Promise’ was recorded there deep in the Scottish Highlands and released on Heavenly Recordings in November.

EVENT INFORMATION

Full details: caughtbytheriver.net

Date: Monday 9 April 2018, 7pm.

Venue: The Social, 5 Little Portland St, London W1W 7JD

Tickets: £7 in advance 

For more information or to book tickets, visit the Caught by the River Thames website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide.com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

World’s earliest figural tattoos revealed by the British Museum

If you think tattoos are a modern phenomenon, you may be surprised by recent fascinating research from the British Museum.

The world’s earliest figural tattoos have been revealed on two natural mummies in the British Museum’s collection. Dating to between 3351 to 3017 BC, figural tattoos of a wild bull and a Barbary sheep were identified on the upper arm of a male mummy and linear and S-shaped motifs have been identified on the upper arm and shoulder of a female mummy; the oldest tattoos ever found on a female body. The findings are due to be published in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Daniel Antoine, one of the lead authors of the research paper and the British Museum’s Curator of Physical Anthropology said ‘The use of the latest scientific methods, including CT scanning, radiocarbon dating and infrared imaging, has transformed our understanding of the Gebelein mummies. Only now are we gaining new insights into the lives of these remarkably preserved individuals. Incredibly, at over five thousand years of age, they push back the evidence for tattooing in Africa by a millennium’.

The mummies individuals are from Egypt’s Predynastic period, the era preceding the country’s unification by the first pharaoh at around 3100 BCE.

The male mummy, known as Gebelein Man A has been on display almost continuously since his discovery around 100 years ago. Previous CT scans showed that Gebelein Man A was a young man when he died (18 – 21 years of age) from a stab wound to the back. Dark smudges on his arm, appearing as faint markings under natural light had remained unexamined. Infrared photography recently revealed that these smudges were in fact tattoos of two slightly overlapping horned animals. 

The horned animals have been tentatively identified as a wild bull (long tail, elaborate horns) and a Barbary sheep (curving horns, humped shoulder). Both animals are well known in Predynastic Egyptian art. The designs are not superficial and have been applied to the dermis layer of the skin, the pigment was carbon-based, possibly some kind of soot.

The female mummy, known as Gebelein woman, has several tattoos, a series of four small ‘S’ shaped motifs can be seen running vertically over her right shoulder.

Below them on the right arm is a linear motif which is similar to objects held by figures participating in ceremonial activities on the painted ceramics of the period. It may represent a crooked stave, a symbol of power and status, or a throw-stick or batons and/or clappers used in ritual dance. The S–motif also appears as an element of Predynastic pottery decoration, always in multiples.

Both sets of tattoos would have been highly visible and may have denoted status, bravery, cult/magical knowledge or protection.

Previously archaeologists had thought that tattooing was gender restricted and only applied to women. This was due to ‘tattoos’ being depicted only on female figurines of the period. But the discovery of tattoos on the male mummy now shows body modification concerned both sexes.Seven mummies from the same site were examined as part of the research, though tattoos were only found on two.

The application of tattoos to the human body has enjoyed a long and diverse history in many ancient cultures. The Gebelein tattoos can be considered amongst the earliest surviving tattoos in the world.

For more information , visit the British Museum website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in January 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website
here

Lloyd’s Choir Spring Concert at St Giles, Cripplegate Church – 22nd March 2018

One of the delights of the City of London is the series of concerts that take place in many of the historic churches dotted around the Square Mile.

One of the oldest choirs in the City not connected directly to the churches is the Lloyd’s Choir which was first formed in 1922. The choir first performed in 1922, within the Underwriting Room at the Royal Exchange and concerts were then given regularly, mainly in the Public Hall of the same building.

After the Second World War, the choir was re-established and performed with considerable success.  In the 1980s, the choir moved to St. Katharine Cree in Leadenhall Street which is still home to the choir today.

Jacques Cohen – Musical Director

Since then, a series of professional conductors have greatly enhanced the reputation of the choir. The choir regularly perform concerts in various locations around the city and has featured on television several times.

One of the highlights of the choir’s year is the Spring Concert to be held in the St Giles, Cripplegate Church, Fore Street, London EC2Y 8DA (in London’s Barbican) on Thursday 22nd March  2018 at  7pm.

The programme will have a nautical theme with Parry’s Crossing the Bar, Elgar’s Sea Pictures and Vaughan Williams A Sea Symphony  with Jacques Cohen conducting the choir with the Cohen Ensemble and soloists.

Tickets £ 20 ( £12 Students).

For more information about the Lloyd’s Choir, visit their website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and the latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here