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Monthly Archives: December 2016

London Boat Show at ExCeL London – 6th to 15th January 2017

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The London Boat Show returns to the Excel Exhibition Centre, the show provides a showcase of all things marine and is the first place to see the latest marine innovations, design and technology. The 2017 Show will host the latest launches, products and marine brands, as well as offer a wide range of activities that will entertain the whole family .

The show has over 300 exhibitors who feature many exciting new products, seven World launches have already been confirmed from the likes of Princess Yachts, Sunseeker International, Cobra Ribs and Nautilus Yachting with a further four UK and seven Show launches planned.

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Returning to the Show is The London Stage, the place to enjoy live entertainment with exclusive performances throughout the 10-days, The Stage will also play host to fashion events, showcasing the latest in boating trends. Visitors can also expect to see Sky Sports Presenter, Alec Wilkinson, hosting regular features from sailing greats including Dee Caffari MBE and Saskia Clarke to boating favourites Zeb Soanes and Alex Alley. They will be sharing their inspiring stories and expert knowledge through interactive talks and panel shows, including:

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A Question of Sailing

Based on the classic TV programme, this popular quiz show will be full of facts, fun and celebrities going head to head.

Sailing Uncovered

With appearances from well-known pioneers, innovators and adventurers, this interactive show will offer visitors the chance to put their questions to the experts and pick up some top tips.

The Daily Brunch Show

The Daily Brunch Show will welcome in each day of the Show at a leisurely pace. Alec Wilkinson will be accompanied by special guests to take visitors through the breaking headlines from the morning papers as well as updates from the Show floor.

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In addition, the new Dream Lodge Marina & Boating Lake is one of the stunning new feature attractions at this year’s Show. The setting sees beautiful yachts moored in the marina as well as offering fantastic places to eat and drink.  The Marina will also play host to fantastic on the water activities including the ‘blind-boating challenge’ and seabob demonstrations.

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Positioned adjacent to the Dream Lodge Marina, is the Watersports Park powered by Rockley. Providing activity both on the water and land, this interactive area offers visitors the chance to try out some of the latest watersports trends including Stand Up Paddleboarding, kayaking, sailing and water zorbing. Alternatively, visitors can enjoy demonstrations of innovative new equipment and cooking events.

The 63rd London Boat Show offers an impressive display of products and numerous interactive attractions to have fun whilst exploring the world of boating. 

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

London International Mime Festival – 9th January to 4th February 2017

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The London International Mime Festival enters its 40th anniversary season with a host of premieres and artists new to the festival, the festival is bringing back some of visual theatre’s most admired names in this special year including acrobat-genius Mathurin Bolze (Cie MPTA), Charleroi Danses’ Kiss & Cry and Mossoux Bonté, German Mask-theatre experts Familie Flöz, and Gandini Juggling with a hugely expanded version of its glorious Pina Bausch tribute, Smashed.

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Elsewhere there’s surrealist Greek glam live art, manga-inspired drama from Italy, and extraordinary object theatre exploring neuroscience, exile, arson and the Shakespeare authorship debate. And much more!

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London International Mime Festival has a long and distinguished history since it  was created in 1977. It was founded by  Joseph Seelig and mime/clown, Nola Rae to showcase the work of British visual theatre artists, many better known abroad than in their own country.

The Festival programme spans the spectrum of wordless performance including live art, physical theatre, new circus, puppetry and object theatre.

Some of the venues include

Barbican, Jacksons Lane, Lilian Baylis Studio, Platform Theatre, Shoreditch Town Hall, Soho Theatre, Southbank Centre and The Peacock Theatre.

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Event website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Chinese New Year 2017 in Trafalgar Square – 29th January 2017

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Come and welcome the Year of the Rooster as London celebrates Chinese New Year 2017.

Taking in some of London’s most famous areas including Leicester Square, Charing Cross Road, Chinatown and Trafalgar Square, London’s Chinese New Year festivities are the biggest outside Asia.

Chinese New Year is an important traditional Chinese holiday celebrated at the turn of the Chinese calendar. In China, it is also known as the Spring Festival or the “Lunar New Year”.

The source of Chinese New Year is itself centuries old and gains significance because of several myths and traditions. Traditionally, the festival was a time to honour deities as well as ancestors. Chinese New Year is celebrated in countries and territories with significant Chinese populations, including Mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mauritius, Philippines, and also in Chinatowns elsewhere. Chinese New Year is considered a major holiday for the Chinese.

Within China, regional customs and traditions concerning the celebration of the Chinese new year vary widely. Often, the evening preceding Chinese New Year’s Day is an occasion for Chinese families to gather for the annual reunion dinner. It is also traditional for every family to thoroughly cleanse the house, in order to sweep away any ill-fortune and to make way for good incoming luck. Windows and doors will be decorated with red color paper-cuts and couplets with popular themes of “good fortune” or “happiness”, “wealth”, and “longevity.” Other activities include lighting firecrackers and giving money in red paper envelopes.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

All you need to know about the London New Year’s Day Parade – 1st January 2017

The London New Years Day Parade

After the massive New Year Eve celebrations in London, events for New Years Day always seem a little low key. However the London New Year’s Day Parade has grown considerably from its origins in 1987.

The London New Years Day Parade

The Parade offers an eclectic mix of pageantry, marching bands and contributions from some of the London Boroughs. Over 8,500 performers representing 20 countries world-wide will assemble for the 2017 Parade.

The London New Years Day Parade

There is always a number of American marching bands and cheerleaders who add a bit of razzmatazz to the proceedings. Although many people may be suffering hangovers from the night before, the parade regularly attracts crowds of two thirds of a million and has a large worldwide television audience.

The London New Years Day Parade

The Parade starts at 12 midday on Piccadilly at the junction with Berkeley Street near Green Park Tube Station and finishes at 3.30 pm in Parliament Square. The Parade route is – Piccadilly, Piccadilly Circus, Lower Regent Street, Waterloo Place, Pall Mall, Cockspur Street, Trafalgar Square, Whitehall and Parliament Street.

An important part of the parade is raising money for charity and various charities have benefitted over the years. This year there will be series of concerts before and after the event involving a selection of bands and orchestras performing in different venues.

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

Skating on Ice at the Museum of London – 16th December 2016 to 8th February 2017

Skating on the Serpentine: 1838

Skating on the Serpentine by J Baber 1839 (c) Museum of London

One of Londoner’s favourite winter pastimes is skating on the outside rinks dotted around the capital. The Museum of London latest display, Skating on Ice, explores the popular seasonal pastime of ice skating in London and considers its history which dates back to at least the 12th century. The first known account by William FitzStephen describes locals strapping animal bones to their feet to play on a patch of ice at Moorfields in 1173.

If the original skates were rudimentary, over time there were considerable advancements in ice skate designs and the display highlights changing fashions, and demonstrates how skating on London’s frozen lakes and ponds became an annual, if sometimes dangerous, winter tradition.

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Dandies showing off by Thomas Tegg 1818 (c) Museum of London

The most popular lake during the 19th century was the Serpentine in Hyde Park, attracting up to 10,000 skaters each day. A 1839 oil painting from the museum’s collection by J. Baber depicts a typically festive scene from these times, with stalls hiring out skates and selling food and drink.

Skating on frozen lakes and ponds often led to tragedies, one of the worst incidents happened in Regent’s Park on 15 January 1867, when around 500 revellers were enjoying an afternoon of skating on the frozen ornamental pond. The ice suddenly shattered and scores of skaters disappeared into the waters below. Sketches on display from the Illustrated London News in 1867 show the rescue operation to recover the 40 bodies of those who had drowned. 

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Illustrated London News 1867 depicting Regents Park Tragedy (c) Museum of London

From the 1920s until the Second World War, the number of indoor and man-made rinks then rose dramatically, including a temporary ice rink installed on the roof of Selfridge’s in 1924. This led to an increase in fashions related to the pastime. A navy blue gabardine skirt suit on show from the department store Fortnum & Mason demonstrates the height of sophisticated skating fashion in the late 1930s.

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Christina Greenberry’s Ice skates from the late 1930s (c) Museum of London

Other highlights of the display include a pair of flattened and polished post-medieval animal bone skates, a pair of Victorian racing skates known as Fen Runners, a pair of women’s ankle boots from the early 1900s said to be convertible for ice skating, and a pair of ice skates from the late 1930s used almost weekly by Londoner Christina Greenberry at Streatham Ice Arena.

Skating on Ice is a free display at the Museum of London from 16 December 2016 – 8 February 2017.

If you would like further information or book tickets, visit the Museum of London website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in 2014, we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Sculpture in the City to 1st May 2017

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Now in its sixth year, the critically acclaimed Sculpture in the City returned to the Square Mile in June with contemporary works from internationally renowned artists.

With winter just around the corner, the seventeen artworks in 20 locations are mixing with other attractions in the city to offer plenty of interest for visitors. The artworks are often placed near iconic architectural landmarks such as the Gherkin and the Cheesegrater.

Find a full list of artworks below.

1. ‘Ajar’ | Gavin Turk | 2011

As a direct reference to the painting ‘La Victoire’ by Rene Magritte, ‘Ajar’ is a surreal gateway: a spiritual journey through the imagination, an interactive sculpture that children will enjoy as much as adults.

2. ‘Fire Walker’ | William Kentridge and Gerhard Marx | 2009

The original ‘Fire Walker’ is a fragmented, eleven-metre high ‘anti-monument’ created by William Kentridge and Gerhard Marx in response to a commission by the City of Johannesburg in 2010.

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3. ‘Cadenetas’ | Lizi Sánchez | 2016

Lizi Sánchez’s practice reflects on the emergence of modernist abstraction, combining this with references to confectionary brands, party paper chains, and articles of mass consumption.

4. ‘SUNRISE. east. July’ / ‘SUNRISE. east. October’ | Ugo Rondinone | 2005

Ugo Rondinone’s series of twelve giant masks – each named for a month of the year – are at once monolithic and ghostlike, their massive bronze forms offset by a shimmering silver patina. Set on top of concrete plinths, the globular, elongated heads express distinct moods – variously smiling, menacing and doleful – and pick up on Rondinone’s recurring motif, the mask.

5. ‘Cadenetas’ | Lizi Sánchez | 2016

See above (#3)

6. ‘Falling into virtual reality’ | Recycle Group | 2016

Recycle Group reflects on what our time will leave behind for future generations, what artefacts archaeologists will find after we are gone, and whether these artefacts will find their place in the cultural layer.

7. ‘Axis Mundi’ | Jürgen Partenheimer | 1997/2014

The colour of the bronze cubes of ‘Axis Mundi’ is predominantly ultramarine blue, divided into three translucent chromatic shades, which create an ascending, changing rhythm on all sides of the sculpture.

8. ‘The Orientalist’ | Huma Bhabha | 2007

Huma Bhabha’s ‘The Orientalist’ is cast in bronze, reminiscent in its authority of a king or deity. Traditional and futuristic, Bhabha’s regal figure is an impressive vision from a fictional history. The title of the work conveys ideas of exoticism, which contributes to this imagined narrative.

9. ‘Aurora’ | Anthony Caro | 2000/2003

‘Aurora’ was made using a tank which was originally a floating buoy used as an anchoring point for ships in the ocean – it came from a naval salvage dealer In Portsmouth. 

10. ‘Cadenetas’ | Lizi Sánchez | 2016

See above (#3)

11.  ‘Centaurus’/’Camelopardalis’ | Michael Lyons | 2015

The sculptures exhibited are part of an ongoing series based on the stars and constellations called ‘The Star Series’. Found and fabricated parts are transformed into new configurations. They are not ‘illustrations’ but draw on mythology, astronomy and astrology across many ages and traditions.

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12. ‘Of Saints and Sailors’ | Benedetto Pietromarchi | 2016

‘Of Saints and Sailors’ originated from a transatlantic journey on a cargo ship carrying wood pulp from Uruguay to the Netherlands, where the artist joined a fraternity of 19 Filipino men who lived at sea. Through intimate daily sittings, Pietromarchi modelled busts of the sailors in clay.

13. ‘Untitled’ | Enrico David | 2015 (no longer on display)

Enrico David’s “Untitled” is an unsettling example the artist’s unique anthropomorphic surrealism. Cast in bronze, the work depicts a smooth, expressive skull atop an unrefined stalk of a body.

14. ‘Magic Lantern Small’ | Mat Collishaw | 2010

During the Winter of 2010 the cupola of the Victoria and Albert Museum hosted a specially commissioned light installation by British artist, Mat Collishaw. A grand scale zoetrope visible from the street below, created the effect of moths fluttering within the dome around an oversized lantern

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15. ‘Laura’ | Jaume Plensa | 2013

‘Laura’ is part of Jaume Plensa’s on-going series of portraits. Each sculpture is drawn from a particular model of a young girl, whose image is then elaborated into a more universal symbol for dreaming and aspiring. Part of the technical process involves photography. The essence of the photograph – a moment caught in time – belies the architectural volume of the final form. 

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16. ‘Idee di pietra – 1373 Kg di luce’ | Giuseppe Penone | 2010

Over nine metres tall, Giuseppe Penone’s sculpture presents a bronze deciduous tree bearing the fruit of five river stones, nestled within its branches. The bronze encapsulates the memory of the tree, memorialising and extending its life as it appears to rise out of the ground, undeterred by the weight of the boulders. Both the tree on which the sculpture is based and the river stones are local to the artist’s studio in Northern Italy.

17. ‘Solar|Relay’ | Petroc Sesti | 2016 (second screening will take place 17 and 18 September)

The piece displays Petroc Sesti’s ongoing research into creating contained environments for the chaotic expression of raw energy. The Sun initially featured in his work in a previous collaboration with NASA in 2001 using footage from their ‘SOHO’ space probe for the creation of Suspended Animation.

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18. ‘Florian’ / ‘Kevin’ | Sarah Lucas | 2013

Sarah Lucas’s bronze sculptures Florian and Kevin depict giant marrows, and are among the largest in a long line of bronze casts by the artist. The marrow functions as a symbol of growth, fecundity and the English pastoral tradition – evoking Harvest Festival cornucopias and country fair competitions.

19. ‘Cadenetas’ | Lizi Sánchez | 2016

See above (#3)

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20. ‘Broken Pillar #12’ | Shan Hur | 2015

Site-specific installation Broken Pillar #12, is part of a body of work developed over the last five years, by Shan Hur. As part of the artist’s practice, Hur incorporates found objects, usually relevant to its location within these structures, encouraging the viewer to question the world around them and the objects hidden within it.

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information , visit the Sculpture in the city website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

The New Face of Classical Music in London? Classical Club Nights

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Over the last few years, a new music scene has become emerging in London. ‘Classical club-nights’ have become increasingly popular way for a new generation of classical performers and composers to showcase their music outside of the traditional concert hall. Part of the success of the ‘classical club nights’ is they are held in pubs and other venues and replicate many other kinds of music nights with DJs playing throughout the night and food and drink freely available.

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The promoters of these ‘club nights’ are keen to illustrate that Classical music can be part of everyone’s lives. One of the main promoters of this new movement is Nonclassical. Founded by composer Gabriel Prokofiev in 2004, Nonclassical is a club-night and record label based in East London. They have promoted shows at venues such as Hoxton Bar & Kitchen, The Shacklewell Arms, The Macbeth, and The Horse and Groom, as well as hosting one-off performances in locations such as Kings Place, Cargo, XOYO and The Roundhouse. 

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These performances introduce contemporary classical, experimental and electronic music to an audience that are searching for some of the latest exciting developments in classical music played by highly talented classical musicians.

The Nonclassical record label has released 14 albums to date, with an ever-growing spectrum of music represented (such as Tansy Davies, Juice Vocal Ensemble, Aisha Orazbayeva, GeNIA, and Joby Burgess).

If you would like to experience one of the latest London music scenes, here are the next couple of events promoted by Nonclassical.

Signs, Games & Messages // curated by Laurence Osborn

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

8:00pm – 11:30pm

The Victoria Pub , 451 Queensbridge Road, London E8 3AS

Performers

The Explore Ensemble featuring  members of the Manon Quartet and classical accordionist Bartosz Glowacki plus Nonclassical DJs.

Programme

Arne Gieshoff (*1988) — MUD II for tape

Györgi Kurtág (*1926) — Signs, Games & Messages for String Trio

Franz Schubert (1797–1828) — String Trio B-flat major D581

Laurence Osborn (*1989) — Breaths for accordion

Tickets £5 (students – on the door) / £8 (advance) / £10 (on the door)

Battle of the Bands 2017

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

8:00pm – 11:30pm

The Victoria Pub , 451 Queensbridge Road, London E8 3AS

The famous annual Battle of the Bands is back!

Some of the most original voices on the contemporary classical scene, from avant-garde classics to electronics and improvisation, plus Nonclassical DJs

Tickets £5 (students – on the door) / £8 (advance) / £10 (on the door)

For more information or to buy a ticket, visit the Nonclassical website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here

 

Book Review : Australia’s Impressionists – edited by Christopher Riopelle (National Gallery)

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Impressionism is considered a European art movement, however this book and the National Gallery’s new exhibition Australian Impressionists due to open in December 2016 provide evidence that the movement had a wider global influence and inspired a group of Australian artists who became known as the ‘Australian Impressionists’.

The first chapter in the book entitled Australia’s Impressionists in a World Context by Christopher Riopelle considers how the rise of national self-consciousness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries led to artists in Scandinavia, America, Japan and other countries to explore new ways of self-expression. The rise of the Impressionist movement encouraged artists to move outside their studios and paint the world around them. The practice of painting en plein air (in the open air) was often linked to ideas of national identity in many countries.

The complex interaction of these forces is illustrated by looking at the paintings of Tom Roberts (1856–1931), Arthur Streeton (1867–1943), Charles Conder (1868–1909) and John Russell (1858–1930). All of these artists were key players in creating a distinct Australian art movement which although influenced by the European tradition of plein-air painting developed a new Australian landscape style. Three of the artists worked mainly in Australia, however John Russell lived in France for most of his life, and was friends with Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet.  

The second chapter, The Sunny South by Tim Bonyhady charts how Roberts, Condor and Streeton embraced ‘plein-air’ painting to illustrate some of unique qualities of  Australian landscapes. Many of these landscapes portrayed the vastness of the land and oceans and the power of the sun that created a dazzling glare.

The chapter about the 9 by 5 Impression Exhibition looks in detail at the exhibition of 1889 which promoted the works of Roberts, Streeton, and Conder. It was staged in Melbourne and provided Australians with their first look at a local variant of the Impressionist movement. The exhibition was the subject of considerable press interest, however the critical reception was mixed with many critics influenced by John Ruskin’s unflattering views on the Impressionist movement. Despite the criticism, Australian Impressionist painters were in the vanguard of asserting a distinctive Australian identity. The chapter Creating a National Identity by Sarah Thomas discusses this process and how a shared new national identity was developed that paid homage to the hard working pioneers such as stockmen, drovers, gold miners and shearers.

Away from the nation building in Australia, John Russell was discovering the landscape of Brittany. Russell’s relationship with Tom Roberts in particular provided a bridge between the latest developments in Europe and the Australian movement. Russell tried to communicate to Roberts some of the techniques of French Impressionism especially in the use of colour. What effect these views had on Roberts and the other Australian impressionists is difficult to know but they did provide a direct link between artists thousands of miles apart.

This fascinating book explores the little known works of Australia’s Impressionists within the wider context of Impressionism as an international phenomenon.  The late 19th and 20th centuries were times of great political and social movements that sought to challenge the ‘old order’, art often played a part in these movements by creating images that portrayed favourable aspects of a particular identity. Looking through the stunning illustrations in the book, it is possible to identify how the ‘modern image of Australia’ was being gradually created by the artists which was vastly different from concepts of the British empire. Tom Roberts’ A Break Away and Arthur Streeton’s Fire On are reminiscent of images of the American Wild West, evoking ideas of pioneers creating a new land. It was these types of images that gained in popularity in Australia in the early  20th century. 

Visiting London Guide Rating – Highly Recommended

For more information or to buy a copy, visit the National Gallery website here

London Visitors is the official blog for the Visiting London Guide .com website. The website was developed to bring practical advice and latest up to date news and reviews of events in London.
Since our launch in  2014 , we have attracted thousands of readers each month, the site is constantly updated.
We have sections on Museums and Art Galleries, Transport, Food and Drink, Places to Stay, Security, Music, Sport, Books and many more.
There are also hundreds of links to interesting articles on our blog.
To find out more visit the website here